Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Best at adding funny moments/elements of comedy.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best at adding funny moments/elements of comedy.

    Moorcock Vs. Tolkien:

    Best at adding funny moments/elements of comedy.

    Whose novels/books made you laugh the most?
    7
    Michael Moorcock
    100.00%
    7
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    0%
    0

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

  • #2
    Without a doubt, Michael Moorcock! The Jerry Cornelius novels are filled with comedic moments and although I haven't got around to reading it yet, The Chinese Agent looks like it will be hilarious fun.
    "He found a coin in his pocket, flipped it. She called: 'Incubus!'
    'Succubus,' he said. 'Lucky old me.'" - Michael Moorcock The Final Programme

    Comment


    • #3
      An easy one. Mike wins hands down. Of course, Tolkien probably has the advantage when it comes to a working knowledge of the correct use of riddles in the Early Middle Ages.

      Comment


      • #4
        Kroofudi! Ferkit!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          On the one hand, Mike wrote The Chinese Agent; on the other, Tolkien wrote... er... hmm... wait... hang on... I'm sure something will come to me in just a moment...
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          Bugger.
          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

          Comment


          • #6
            I wish the Chinese Agent and the Russian Intelligence had a third book in the series.
            Having a Multiverse where there is humorous version is unique.
            A meeting of Jerry Cornell and Elric MUST HAPPEN!
            "What do you think you're doing? This is a closed set!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Mike's Doctor Who novel follows somewhat in that form: not quite as blatantly in-it-for-the-laughs but that is clearly what it is about.

              Comment


              • #8
                The Between the Wars Sequence, for all the grotesque horror and historical tragedies unfolding around young Pyat : the least sympathetic anti -hero ever; contains moments of surreal levity when the unreliable -to-put-it mildly narrator recombines in memory entirely different people and then criticizes these fantasy fusion characters for their shortcomings !😆
                Last edited by Kymba334; 05-29-2020, 01:05 AM.
                Mwana wa simba ni simba

                The child of a lion is also a lion - Swahili Wisdom

                Comment

                Working...
                X