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Favourite Moorcock 'Non-genre' Novel

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  • Favourite Moorcock 'Non-genre' Novel

    Please vote for your favourite 'non-genre' novel by Michael Moorcock.
    42
    Caribbean Crisis
    0.00%
    0
    The LSD Dossier
    0.00%
    0
    The Final Programme
    7.14%
    3
    The Chinese Agent (Somewhere in the Night)
    0.00%
    0
    A Cure for Cancer
    7.14%
    3
    Breakfast in the Ruins
    4.76%
    2
    The English Assassin
    4.76%
    2
    The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius
    7.14%
    3
    The Condition of Muzak
    0.00%
    0
    Gloriana
    11.90%
    5
    The Russian Intelligence (Printer's Devil)
    0.00%
    0
    Byzantium Endures
    9.52%
    4
    The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle (Gold Diggers of 1977)
    0.00%
    0
    The Entropy Tango
    0.00%
    0
    The Brothel in Rosenstrasse
    9.52%
    4
    The Laughter of Carthage
    0.00%
    0
    Mother London
    21.43%
    9
    Jerusalem Commands
    4.76%
    2
    King of the City
    7.14%
    3
    The Vengeance of Rome
    4.76%
    2
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

  • #2
    This one was my hardest vote. I chose Mother London, but could have chosen King of the City, Brothel in Rosenstrasse, Byzantium Endures, A Cure for Cancer, Breakfast in the Ruins, or Gloriana. Eek!

    Comment


    • #3
      Some many great books, but Una and Catherine sticks out in my mind.
      Yuki says, "Krimson used to be known as Kommando, but he rarely uses that name anymore. Sometimes he appears as Krimson Gray as well. Do not be confused, he still loves cats and bagels."

      Comment


      • #4
        I wanted to vote for Una and Catherine as a personal favorite, ended up with King of the City which I think is better - but If Una and Catherine had been in the SF poll it would have been an easy choice there.

        Comment


        • #5
          Jerusalem Commands for me as I think it is by far the best Pyatt novel. Gloriana runs it a close second but


          As the best Cornelius book, I would have voted for The Condition of Muzak, but I really think that the JC novels are a superior and groundbreaking form of science fiction rather than non-genre.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by johneffay View Post
            Jerusalem Commands for me as I think it is by far the best Pyatt novel. Gloriana runs it a close second but


            As the best Cornelius book, I would have voted for The Condition of Muzak, but I really think that the JC novels are a superior and groundbreaking form of science fiction rather than non-genre.

            Ha! I agree with your spoiler. I laughed out loud.

            I also agree with you about the JC novels. Categorizing them as non-genre may more about the genre than the JC novels. I think of them relative to much of the other SF work of the time, and I cannot really compare them, as JC is so very human. Most of the other work of the time featured aliens and spacecraft ( in my book, for the most part), trying to show readers what makes humans different than these strange creatures and places. JC held up a mirror to show us humanity, which is far scarier, and in some ways far more disturbing to me than any comparison can be.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with you both. I went with Mother London, but the JC novels gave me pause. I resolved it in much the same way - by deciding they were science fiction on, er well, that is....
              Kevin McCabe
              The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

              Comment


              • #8
                I'll accept that the title for this poll - 'non-genre fiction' - isn't entirely appropriate. Caribbean Crisis and The LSD Dossier are both thrillers, The Chinese Agent is a comedy caper, Gloriana has elements of fantasy in it (apparently - it's on my 'to read' list), even Byzantium Endures has some sf-ness to it (cf. Pyat's one-man flying machine). So really it's a 'holding pen' for non-sf/fantasy novels rather than non-genre.

                And I suppose had I thought about it, both The Final Programme and A Cure For Cancer originally appeared in New Worlds SF.

                But when I when I read them I don't really think I'm reading a sf book. It's kind of like I don't really think of Watchmen or V For Vendetta as sf comics although they are I suppose. Perhaps its the absence of spaceships, aliens, strange unknown planets and five year missions that causes this? Or maybe it's that I no longer consider the new Battlestar Galactica to be sf. It just happens to take place in space.

                In my mind, the JC novels are beginning to 'transcend' genre even if that's how they started out. Certainly, having read the first three parts of the JC Quartet recently I didn't find myself thinking 'Oh this is science fiction' - any more than I do when I watch Dr. No, say - and by The English Assassin I would say that Moorcock is leaving the world of sf far behind him. I remember Mike saying around the time that The White Wolf's Son came out that he almost couldn't call it a fantasy novel any more because he'd taken it about as far as you could take a fantasy novel before it stopped being fantasy.

                Anyway, that about the long and the short of why I placed them where I did. I apologise (again) for any confusion.
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by David Mosley View Post

                  Anyway, that about the long and the short of why I placed them where I did. I apologise (again) for any confusion.
                  Ha ha! Keep apologizing for your hard work. It creates an interesting set of questions. Now that I think about it, I will start a thread in the Multiversal Manuscripts forum to pursue it. After my morning class, though...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Now this is difficult!

                    No being able to choose a favourite Pyat novel, I went for 'Mother London'. I didn't get a lot out of it first time I read it, but the second time is still echoing around in my head. It left a very deep impression in my memory, and I can still feel the joy of the high points and despair of the low points. If one can engage with this book it is a highly rewarding read.
                    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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                    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Byzantium Endures. (so far,but I imagine that I will like all four of the Pyat books equally.) -but I have a feeling Vengeance of Rome,when I finally read it, is going to be in my top five best things ever put to print.

                      I also like the JC stuff,but I guess if I have to choose....

                      "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                      - Michael Moorcock

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island View Post
                        Now this is difficult!

                        No being able to choose a favourite Pyat novel, I went for 'Mother London'. I didn't get a lot out of it first time I read it, but the second time is still echoing around in my head. It left a very deep impression in my memory, and I can still feel the joy of the high points and despair of the low points. If one can engage with this book it is a highly rewarding read.
                        Right on the nose, Guv! ML has very high highs, and very low lows, but some people have to work to engage with it.

                        I also have to mention that Josef Kiss might be my favorite of all of Mike's characters.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are many books on this list that I haven't read yet! I need to order some books at work I guess... (I hope they're still in print!)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Pyat books are worthy of a poll on their own. If I could have voted for them as a single novel, it probably would have gotten the guernsey.

                            And I voted for the Cornelius books already

                            "Mother London" and "King of the City" are probably superior works but I HAD to vote for Gloriana. I remember when I first bought it - it was the 1978 Fontana edition and it was a thing of beauty. I subsequently named my long running ADD character Montfalcon....
                            Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
                            Bakunin

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Newbie that I am, I've only read one book in that list and thus feel compelled to select it. *Cooks eggs on the still steaming ruins*
                              Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

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