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Deep purple perfect stragers etc MM related?

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  • Deep purple perfect stragers etc MM related?

    Is the deep purple song Perfect strangers MM related. Is the stormbringer album as MM related as it sounds?

  • #2
    Didn't think Perfect Strangers was Moorcock related....

    The Stormbringer album is not worth having in my opinion unless you're a Whitesnake fan or something.

    The song "Stormbringer" is the only Moorcock related track on it and is available on most best of Deep Purple Albums ("Deepest Purple" is good).

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    • #3
      It just sounds so erekose( 8) reading it at the time)

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      • #4
        The song "Stormbringer" is the only Moorcock related track on it
        Yeah, and one would be hard-pressed to prove it actually is about Elric's sword at all. The only lines that even speak to this are "He's got nothing you need. He's gonna make you bleed."

        I personally think the song sounds more like it's about some totally unrelated hero who happens to go by the name Stormbringer. Has Deep Purple (or MM for that matter) ever actually claimed it was about Elric?
        "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
        --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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        • #5
          I think DP just poached the name from Moorcock (they are fans I hear), in this way it is very loosely Moorcock-related...

          The lyrics are cheesey as anything but the music rocks and it's definately the best song on that album.

          I personally don't think of Elric when I hear the song, though I did hear the song a long time before I read any Moorcock.

          The song has inspired people to pick up the book and read it, just as the book is causing people to seek out the song.

          For this reason and the fact that the song is a good one to dance too, the song is good.

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          • #6
            Oh yes! Great music! How can anyone not like Deep Purple?

            And you're right, Etive, it turns people on to Moorcock who might not have read him otherwise (and that's a very good thing).

            But hey, yolanda, if you want a song that IS about Stormbringer, listen to Blue Öyster Cult's "Black Blade."

            Rock on!
            "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
            --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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            • #7
              FYI, the band's use of the name was an unconcsious lift. There was an interview when it came out in NME in which the interviewer said 'Why did you use a title of Michael Moorcock's book ?' A: We didn't. It's a mythological name. NME: No it isn't. A: Yes it is... It was on that level.
              I'm not a great Deep Purple fan myself. I do like BOC's version of Black Blade, however. I've performed my own version of that song, which has my own tune, but I really like what Eric Bloom did with it.
              And Hawkwind, of course, had my blessing and did a lot of Elric related
              material, naturally, in The Chronicles of the Black Sword. I think John Martyn's 'Stormbringer' album (which preceded DP's) was another
              unconscious lift. Mark Boland, on the other hand, did a lot of Elric derived lyrics, certainly when he and Steve Took were still together.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the clarification, Mike.

                Anyway, it brings me to a question about my favorite Bأ–C song which is, I'm sure you've guessed, Veteran of the Psychic Wars. Are the final lyrics to that song all your own, or did Eric Bloom alter them somewhat? You're both credited with writing the song and I'm hoping his contributuion was just the cool music (and that he left your writing alone).

                {edit: stupidity removed from post} :roll:
                "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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                • #9
                  I'd been meaning to get some more Mark Boland stuff, can anyone recommend anything in particular?

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                  • #10
                    The period that Michael is referring to is the really early Tyranosaurus Rex days before the name got shortened to T Rex. I never noticed Moorcock references, but I believe the man himself if he says they're in there. That material is really folky with Steve "Peregrin" Took playing bongos to Mark Bolan's guitar and vocals. I believe the Castle Communications (or was it Receiver Records) label has reissued at least one set of two l.p.s from that phase on cd.

                    Later, I think Bolan heard Zeppelin and liked what he heard, because he went electric and quite a bit heavier. The best known, and perhaps best album from that phase is Electric Warrior (which sounds a bit like a Hawkwind title, eh?) which contains "Get it On (Bang a Gong)", but also several lesser known songs that I like a bit more. "Planet Queen" and "Life's a Gas" are just absolute classics.

                    Another great oddball album is Dandy in the Underworld which may have been his last. It's kind of Bolan's answer to his buddy David Bowie's Lets Dance album, with a decidedly synthy new wave take on things, not unlike Gary Numan's best work. I like the album a lot more than Bowie's effort in that direction, but maybe like "Get it On" that has something to do with which one was played to death in pop culture and on the radio.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dead-Air
                      The period that Michael is referring to is the really early Tyranosaurus Rex days before the name got shortened to T Rex.
                      Bolan [real name Feld] published a book of poetry back in the early 70's called 'Warlock of Love'.

                      It's so long since I read it though - love to know what Michael Moorcock thinks of it, if anything.


                      Tyrannosaurus Rex - before their extinction and the rise of Glitter.

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                      • #12
                        Dead Air wrote:
                        Another great oddball album is Dandy in the Underworld which may have been his last. It's kind of Bolan's answer to his buddy David Bowie's Lets Dance album
                        Sorry, man, Bolan was totalled round about the time DB released Heroes, which was three albums and probably 5-6 years before Let's Dance.
                        \"Killing me won\'t bring back your apples!\"

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