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Elric Movie

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  • Ian
    replied
    Well,I had dropped many names at the old Multiverse site,
    so here goes:

    I like Depp or Guy Pearce (Count of Monte Cristo and Time Machine)
    in the role of Elric. Rufus Sewell is not a bad choice either.

    Yyrkoon - Vincent Cassel (Brotherhood of the Wolf)

    Smiorgan Baldhead - unfortunately he's too old now, but Brian Blessed!

    Cymoril - Monica Belucci - especially after the Matrix role - very dark, sultry
    and mysterious (BTW, I never got that Cymoril was that much younger
    than Elric?)

    That's all I have for now. And, as far as actors being too short - LoTR shows
    how that can be overcome :)

    Ian

    Leave a comment:


  • dlackey
    replied
    Well I went back to that same bookstore to take a gander at the price and it was gone...

    Good idea. From now on if I see something in a store or on the net that someone might like, I will post on the Community board. If we all do the same, it should work out okay for everyone.

    I'm going to put a link up there for Dreamhaven books, because they still have same Omnibus volumes at the normal retail price. I just got The Dancers at the End of Time and Earl Aubec in the mail today.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tony_Hough
    replied
    Casting Elric

    Lately I have favoured Eastenders star Nigel Harmen (Dennis) as a potential Elric. He does have the wiry build, rather elfin (Bowie-like even) features and he can do the desperate/dangerous thing really well.
    Bill Bailey needs to be in it somewhere as well. Anyone suggest what as?

    Leave a comment:


  • EverKing
    replied
    That's a great idea! Honestly though, I think we have that tool already...it's right here on the forum. All we'd really have to do is let people know to start a post (in Community Exchange, maybe?) when they see something that others may be interested in. I think if we start seeing alot of them, we can then see about having a seperate section for it.

    I know I'd really like to know when people come across some of your older works or older editions. It's hard to find in the area I live...in fact, I've had to special order nearly every book of yours I own. The only exceptions have been Dreamthief's Daughter (I bought while I was living in Las Vegas) and Skrayling Tree (x-mas present from my brother who lives in the Twin Cities).

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    This brings up another topic I've been mulling over. Some sort of
    way in which one reader can tell others of material that they might be interested in ? Especially 'rarities' and especially when they're available at a reasonable price.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlackey
    replied
    Re: 1972?

    Originally posted by Jeriko
    The oldest publication with an Elric story I have, which I bought recently, is Fantastic: Sicience Fiction and Fantasy Stories, published in February 1972 by Ultimate Publishing Co., Flushing, N.Y. It was titled "The Sleeping Sorceress." (From my experience, it is the first book within The Vanishing Tower, book four of The Elric Saga.) The cover was done by a sophomoric Mike Kaluta depicting the albino holding out the black sword, standing at the peak of a hill or mountain. Perhaps 1972 came from that publication? (Although The Sleeping Sorceress has an intro that states the fact that the first stories were printed in British Science Fantasy in the early 1960's.)

    --Jer
    Hey, I just saw that same book at my local used bookstore the other day! I didn't buy it on grounds that I have a copy of "The Vanishing Tower" in paperback, as well as the omnibus edition. And the sci-fi book club version...

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I came across that the other day. I don't have much of my old stuff.
    I think the first Elric stories started appearing in Science Fantasy in 1961
    (The Stealer of Souls, While the Gods Laugh etc.). John Davey's bibliographical material in the back of the omnibus volumes should clear it all up, but I can't lay hands on that at the moment, either. I tend to
    keep my own books out of sight on the principle that if I saw all the material I'd published already I probably wouldn't ever write another word!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1972?

    The oldest publication with an Elric story I have, which I bought recently, is Fantastic: Sicience Fiction and Fantasy Stories, published in February 1972 by Ultimate Publishing Co., Flushing, N.Y. It was titled "The Sleeping Sorceress." (From my experience, it is the first book within The Vanishing Tower, book four of The Elric Saga.) The cover was done by a sophomoric Mike Kaluta depicting the albino holding out the black sword, standing at the peak of a hill or mountain. Perhaps 1972 came from that publication? (Although The Sleeping Sorceress has an intro that states the fact that the first stories were printed in British Science Fantasy in the early 1960's.)

    --Jer

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Good point. Most people probably don't realise I wrote the short stories and Stormbringer first.

    Leave a comment:


  • kard
    replied
    wasnآ´t Elric of Melnibonأ© credited 1972?

    maybe thatآ´s where the information is from.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I'm trying to go to bed so keep closing before I've finished...
    What I can never work out is how they come up with 1972
    for the Elric stories. The first ones started appearing in 1961,
    I thought.
    Ho hum.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Crash -- I agree. Personally I don't like any of the screen versions of Ballard compared with the books.
    Cawthorn -- Jim and I have been friends since I was 16, as I recall, and he started drawing Elric even as I conceived him, so his Elric is always going to be my personal favourite.
    That said I like a lot of the versions out there and the earliest Elric comics by Craig Russell, from Pacific Comics and then from First Comics are absolutely superb. There are also albums of all Craig's early Elric material (three I think). The Mignola Corum's, however, remain my favourites of that period. He really captured the Corum books wonderfully. I'm sorry that those have never been collected and still hope they will be one day.
    I've been very lucky with artists. But Jim's Elric (as on your logo) remains my personal favourite as being most like the albino as I conceived him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    That's the one. Thanks, pard.
    :D

    Leave a comment:


  • VonBek
    replied
    Here's the link Michael's talking about (USA Today's article....):

    :arrow: http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/...lms-main_x.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • krunky
    replied
    Sorry Mr. M...

    I Overgeneralized a little there in the previous posting. I suppose I was thinking of the way one normally sees books brought to the screen, often without the author's specific involvement.

    Consider Ballard's "Crash." What book could be more visual in its appeal? Now I understand how and why Cronenberg made a slightly different sort of film from what would seem to have been mandated by the material in the book itself -- and even though I like the movie, I don't think it did much in terms of bringing Ballard's story to film. The film is more like a thematic twin than a straight telling from the book. What might have been Ballard's motives there? I think dollars may have played a role there, of course I could be wrong. It wouldn't matter. It doesn't change the intrinsic value of his groundbreaking book -- in a way, it has nothing to do with it. When the movie of a book fails us, we readers just leave it to the side.

    Interestingly, I think you have a little of the same problems with bringing Elric to the screen. Just as Crash is not a film for the LOTR crowd, Elric is not really going to be either -- it's ideas are far too complicated and adult in nature. Elric is not exactly Frodo or Samwise -- those tricksy hobbitsis don't bargain with chaos blades, slay their own kin, destroy their own homeland (intentionally), etc. When one reads Elric one doesn't want to be Elric, one just sort of stands back and observes as the tragic story unfolds...

    Still, I think we are still on the same page in some ways -- if money is not your sole motive then surely things like respect for the existing text, pleasure and conscience are part of the working process. And again, your focus would still seem to be your story, told your way. If a movie can result from that as a guiding ethic, then fine -- if not, you don't want to do it. And in all seriousness, how many book to film adaptations have had that level of respect for authorial intent? I am guessing not many, it certainly doesn't show from the end results we often see.

    BTW, I'd like to see you improve on the Elric texts -- if you can!

    I think I am not being unkind if I suggest that you have set yourself a nigh impossible task there. Even if all these many years later you perhaps cringe at certain passages, narrative complexities, or particular word choices -- there's something very primal in the Elric texts that moved a lot of readers. I don't have quite the same enthusiasm for it now that I did when I was a younger person, but I have very fond memories of reading the books as a teenager.

    On the subject of the Cawthorn helmet...

    I admit to not having seen much of the Cawthorn Elric except what is available at the Savoy books website. I keep meaning to order something from there but haven't gotten around to it yet. But yeah, his Elric images seem quite good -- if a little primitive. The helmet and face are prefection.

    Speaking of artists and collaboration, I'm not going to knock Craig Russell's stuff (which I admire greatly), but the best you have had in comics yet (in my opinion and that I have actually seen) was Two Man Horse's "Prisoner of Pan Tang" story. I think what I'm getting at is the fact that the story was original (you provided a story sketch maybe?) and yet managed to keep the essential tenor of your own stories. But boy, was Gould's artwork rough! It's amazing how quickly his work improved from that story, to the portfolio (the same stuff as was featured in the Blue Star Elric edition), to various print works, to being the current artist on your american hardcover editions. Maybe Russell and Gould could or should do storyboarding, costume, and set design work.

    Some of LOTR's success is attributable to the input of artist Alan Lee. Not at all a small point there.

    Now, I'm just babbling...

    Leave a comment:

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