Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Corum books and the name "Mabden"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Corum books and the name "Mabden"

    Hello there, I'm reading the 2nd Corum books and since the first one i stiil ask myself if Mabden isn't just anagram for Bad Men. Moorcock is famous for his use of anagrams.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Nephesh Phantasos View Post
    Hello there, I'm reading the 2nd Corum books and since the first one i stiil ask myself if Mabden isn't just anagram for Bad Men. Moorcock is famous for his use of anagrams.
    I'd never thought of that before. So, I guessed it was either that or a Cornish word, since Corum was written after Mike read a Cornish dictionary. Googles mabden Cornish and it turns out it's Cornish for mankind.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by postodave View Post

      I'd never thought of that before. So, I guessed it was either that or a Cornish word, since Corum was written after Mike read a Cornish dictionary. Googles mabden Cornish and it turns out it's Cornish for mankind.
      Ah well, didn't know that. You are right. Do you have some articles or the such regarding Corum and Cornish influence? thanks for the reply

      edit: I'm reading Corum's wikipedia page and it's stated that there's a quite deep connection with Celtic mythos (in this case Cornish).
      Last edited by Nephesh Phantasos; 03-12-2021, 01:15 PM. Reason: additional info

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Nephesh Phantasos View Post

        Ah well, didn't know that. You are right. Do you have some articles or the such regarding Corum and Cornish influence? thanks for the reply

        edit: I'm reading Corum's wikipedia page and it's stated that there's a quite deep connection with Celtic mythos (in this case Cornish).
        I think I might have read it in the intro to the first Corum omnibus published in the nineties. Mike mentions it here https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-a...rns#post210973

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by postodave View Post

          I think I might have read it in the intro to the first Corum omnibus published in the nineties. Mike mentions it here https://www.multiverse.org/forum/q-a...rns#post210973
          thanks pal, i admit my google search game was weak ahah
          Last edited by Nephesh Phantasos; 03-15-2021, 03:29 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well, the mabden were badmen. So, I thank you both for illuminating two facets to the story previously obscured because mabden just sounded appropriately celtic and mood setting.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post
              Well, the mabden were badmen. So, I thank yoru both for illuminating two facets to the story previously obscured because mabden just sounded appropriately celtic and mood setting.
              incidentally i'm reading in tandem corum and the revenge of the rose and in the latter it is said by
              , talking about coincidences

              Comment


              • #8
                If your reading The Revenge of the Rose this gives me a second chance to share my Esbern Snare Discovery: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/the...7-esbern-snare

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by postodave View Post
                  If your reading The Revenge of the Rose this gives me a second chance to share my Esbern Snare Discovery: https://www.multiverse.org/forum/the...7-esbern-snare
                  I didn't read any End of TIme books but what i knew is that Wheldrake, at least the name, is derived from an alias of writer Swinburne

                  http://wiki.multiverse.org/index.php...nest_Wheldrake. What's stated in the aformentioned acknowledgement?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It says "Apart from Alfred Austin's, all verses quoted in the text are the work of Ernest Wheldrake. The majority are from Posthumous Poems, published in 1881 and never reprinted."
                    Austin is a real poet, Wheldrake as you note was Moorcock's parody of Swinburne. Some of the verses attributed to Wheldrake are Moorcock's own creations, some, at least one, are the work of other writers. The titles of the trilogy is taken from a poem by Wheldrake, i.e. written by Moorock, while the titles of the individual volumes are from existing writers. Moorcock plays a similar trick in The Condition of Muzak where he includes quotes from Enid Welsford's The Fool but changes the text to include references to Cornelius.

                    Whittier's ballad is worth a read. here .

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X