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SF by Moorcock

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  • SF by Moorcock

    What books by Moorcock would you categorize as science fiction?

  • #2
    There's no great definition of what is SF. But there are loads of books with a strong 'scientific' element, even though the science is never the point.
    The Black Corridor; The Time Dweller; The Shores of Death; The Fireclown; The Dancers (all); The Blood Red Game; Behold the Man; The Second Ether (all); Bastable (all); The Distant Suns; Jerry C (all); Coming of the Terraphiles; Kane (all) and likely more. One could make an argument for Hawkmoon after all.

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    • #3
      So if I am not mistaken, with these 7 (8?) volumes one would have an almost complete set of his SF writings, barring Coming of the Terraphiles and The Black Corridor (and Hawkmoon)?

      Kane of Old Mars (all 1965):
      including Warriors of Mars, Blades of Mars, Barbarians of Mars

      Moorcock's Multiverse (1965-66):
      including The Sundered Worlds, The Winds of Limbo, The Shores of Death

      The Cornelius Quartet (1968-77):
      including The Final Programme, A Cure for Cancer, The English Assassin, The Condition of Muzak

      The Dancers at the End of Time (1972-76):
      including An Alien Heat, The Hollow Lands, The End of all Songs

      The Nomad of Time (1971-81):
      including The Warlord of the Air, The Land Leviathan, The Steel Tsar

      The War Amongst the Angels (1994-96):
      including Blood: A Southern Fantasy, Fabulous Harbours, The War Amongst the Angels

      Breakfast in the Ruins and other Stories (1964-?):
      including "The Time Dweller" and "Behold the Man"

      EDIT:
      The Cornelius Calendar (1976-08) ?
      including "The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius in the Twentieth Century", "The Entropy Tango", "The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle", "The Alchemist's Question", "Firing the Cathedral" and "Modem Times 2.0"
      Last edited by Sir Sorcerer; 01-03-2021, 09:18 AM.

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      • #4
        Sounds about right. There may be a few others but that's quite a lot to be getting on with!

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        • #5
          Thanks. I think I'll start with Jerry Cornelius + Dancers and see where it gets me. I have recently become very interested in the new wave SF movement, and have been revisiting works by Disch, Tiptree and Joana Russ. But I am also planning to read more classic and contemporary science fiction. My goal for 2021 is to get a better sense of the history and present state of SF. Strangely this will also be a return to my childhood, as the first books I read on my own were novels such as The Tripods series, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Dune!

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          • #6
            I forgot about the later Jerry Cornelius stories such as The Alchemist's Question and probably a few more (Firing the Cathedral perhaps?...). I suppose that these are also a kind of science fiction?

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            • #7
              I'd put JC at the very lower end of SF. You've got Jerry's Black Box, needle gun, Ms Brunner's experiments and so on, but it doesn't feel very SF.

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              • #8
                Hmm ok. Maybe Breakfast in the Ruins is actually a better place to start then. It has Behold the Man which was also published in the Gollancz SF Masterworks series. Behold... is often ranked as among MM's best works it seems.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sir Sorcerer View Post
                  Hmm ok. Maybe Breakfast in the Ruins is actually a better place to start then. It has Behold the Man which was also published in the Gollancz SF Masterworks series. Behold... is often ranked as among MM's best works it seems.
                  The trappings are very sci-fi; a lot of writers might have had that idea. A guy from the twentieth century goes back in time to find Jesus and Jesus is not who he expected. It could have been about changing history, or creating history. But the idea that this guy fulfils Jesus role is not seen as an interesting time paradox, it is seen as a way of exploring religious belief and the way people fill a needed historical role. A crass writer might have used the idea to 'explain' Jesus by, for example having miracles done by future technology. This is more an exploration of the social psychology of belief.

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