Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Nature of the Catastrophe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nature of the Catastrophe

    The only one of those I have yet to read is The Nature of the Catastrophe.
    But it will be mine at some point not far in the future. Or is it the past.
    I get confused sometimes.

  • #2
    If you're a completist Harvester, I think it only fair to warn you that not all of the JC stories by other authors in 'The Nature of the Catastrophe' were reprinted in 'The New Nature of the Catastrophe.'
    I only have the more recent one. :(
    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

    Comment


    • #3
      I've seen neither, I'm afraid. Am I right in thinking that there were comic strips (or more comic strips) in the first version? I always feel silly asking these sorts of questions, considering how long I've been here... :oops:
      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

      Comment


      • #4
        I can only vouch for the more recent version, Dee, and I think they have the complete version by Mal Dean et al. Very nice they are, too.
        Just occurred to me I should mention that I have the Millenium h/c edition, I don't know if any of the other editions are different.
        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

        -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

        Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

        :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
          I've seen neither, I'm afraid. Am I right in thinking that there were comic strips (or more comic strips) in the first version? I always feel silly asking these sorts of questions, considering how long I've been here... :oops:
          Of course, John Davey is a far better source for this information, but...

          The first edition has "The Adventures of Jerry Cornelius The English Assassin" as a complete story told in a comic strip. Mike and M. John Harrison did the scripts and Mal Dean and Glyn Jones drew it. The revised edition splits it into smaller stories (with individual credits, which are different) peppered throughout the volume. If I was inspired and not in the middle of something else, I would check them against one another to tell you if and where they are different. I like you a lot, Dee, but not that much :lol:

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Doc
            Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
            I've seen neither, I'm afraid. Am I right in thinking that there were comic strips (or more comic strips) in the first version? I always feel silly asking these sorts of questions, considering how long I've been here... :oops:
            Of course, John Davey is a far better source for this information, but...

            The first edition has "The Adventures of Jerry Cornelius The English Assassin" as a complete story told in a comic strip. Mike and M. John Harrison did the scripts and Mal Dean and Glyn Jones drew it. The revised edition splits it into smaller stories (with individual credits, which are different) peppered throughout the volume. If I was inspired and not in the middle of something else, I would check them against one another to tell you if and where they are different. I like you a lot, Dee, but not that much :lol:
            Apparently, I like you more than I thought, Dee. I checked. It appears that the revised edition has additional material. And I would still trust John D. more than I would trust me flipping through both editions.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Doc
              Apparently, I like you more than I thought, Dee. I checked. It appears that the revised edition has additional material. And I would still trust John D. more than I would trust me flipping through both editions.
              Bless you, Doc. as I say, I hadn't seen either edition, so just knowing that there are some comics to be had is enough to whet my appetite. Very good of you to check. :)

              Sorry, I've gone off-topic again, haven't I? :oops:
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

              Comment


              • #8
                The Nature of the Catastrophe is the ONE book of Mike's that I've never EVER seen in any shape or form. It's conspicous by its absence in the Image Gallery, and it doesn't seem to crop up on eBay either.

                I'm half-inclined to think that it doesn't actually exist in the same continuum that I inhabit.

                The mass-market edition of The New Nature of the Catastrophe omits the comic strip but includes an extra text story iirc.
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Demos99...A gift for you to view~

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...471195-3374318

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There are a couple of copies of Nature... listed at AbeBooks too (y'all be sure to follow the link from the front page, to add to the multiversal coffers! :))

                    Personally, I was tempted at one point to try writing some JC related "fan fiction", but I knew I'd only disappoint myself. At least when I write my own characters, there's nothing to compare them to! And no one can tell me "so-and-so wouldn't do that", because I made them and I'm the only one who knows what they're about. [Cue maniacal laughter, and weird shadows, as Dee paces over to the cupboard where he stores his characters, hanging like empty puppets from a rail] Mine! All mine!!!

                    :oops:
                    "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Harvester
                      Thanks Harvester, but that's the New Nature of the Catastrophe (of which I have two copies - the trade pbk and the mmp). What I'm referring to is the 1971 original edition, which thanks to Dee I've ordered as a last-minute special Christmas present to myself from Abebooks. :)
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by demos99
                        The Nature of the Catastrophe is the ONE book of Mike's that I've never EVER seen in any shape or form. It's conspicous by its absence in the Image Gallery, and it doesn't seem to crop up on eBay either.

                        I'm half-inclined to think that it doesn't actually exist in the same continuum that I inhabit.

                        The mass-market edition of The New Nature of the Catastrophe omits the comic strip but includes an extra text story iirc.
                        :)
                        There is a copy on my shelf, but it may have originated on another plane of the multiverse, as you imply. It was a gift from that dodgy character Michael Moorcock, who is well known for fraternising with time travellers and moonbeam hoppers.

                        This is the contents page of the original Nature of the Catastrophe:

                        CONTENTS

                        INTRODUCTION James Colvin vii
                        THE NATURE OF THE CATASTROPHE
                        Michael Moorcock 1
                        THE FIRMAMENT THEOREM Brian W. Aldiss 9
                        THE NASH CIRCUIT M. John Harrison 24
                        JEREMIAD James Sallis 43
                        SEA WOLVES Michael Moorcock 59
                        THE END OF THE CYCLE Langdon Jones 75
                        THE ASH CIRCUS M. John Harrison 79
                        THE TANK TRAPEZE Michael Moorcock 92
                        THE LAST HURRAH OF THE GOLDEN HORDE
                        Norman Spinrad 106
                        THE ADVENTURES OF JERRY CORNELIUS
                        Script by Michael Moorcock and M. John Harrison,
                        drawings by Mal Dean and R. Glyn Jones 123
                        THE DELHI DIVISION Michael Moorcock 138
                        MARROW James Sallis 146
                        THE FLESH CIRCLE M. John Harrison 149
                        A PRAYER TO MEN Alex Krislov 165
                        LINES OF WHITE ON A SULLEN SEA
                        Maxim Jakubowski 173
                        THE SUNSET PERSPECTIVE Michael Moorcock 180
                        CHRONOLOGY 198

                        The contents list is included in full in John Davey's Reader's Guide at the back of The New Nature of the Catastrophe.

                        Now that you've pointed out its absence, I'm putting a scan of the cover of the original edition in the Image gallery.

                        [link expired]

                        It appears that 2 James Sallis stories were omitted from the New edition; Jeremiad and Marrow. It does contain several additional stories however.

                        And yes, for some reason, the comic strip was split into several pieces for The New NotC.

                        There are 8 copies on ABE at the moment, all priced fairly high.

                        I don't have a copy of the mass market p/b of The New NotC. Can anyone confirm whether it has an extra story?[/b]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          :lol: :lol:

                          While I was typing that post above, the number of copies on ABE went from 8 to 7.

                          I guessed correctly who the purchaser was!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for the scans, Guy. I've ordered (what is hopefully) a nice ex-library edition of NotC, VG with fine D/W for آ£25, which is about all I could justify spending on a copy at this time of year. :)

                            New NotC MM Edition Contents:

                            Introduction to this Edition - MM
                            Introduction to Original Edition - James Colvin
                            The Peking Junction - MM
                            The Delhi Division - MM
                            The Tank Trapeze - MM
                            The Ash Circus - MJH
                            The Firmament Theorem - Brian Aldiss
                            The Last Hurrah of the Golden Horde - Norman Spinrad
                            The Dodgem Decision - MM
                            The Nash Circuit - MJH
                            Lines of White on a Sullen Sea - James Sallis
                            The Anxiety in the Eyes of the Cricket -
                            The End of the Cycle - LJ
                            The Nature of the Catastrophe - MM
                            The Sunset Perspective - MM
                            Sea Wolves - MM
                            Voortrekker - MM
                            The Flesh Circle - MJH
                            A Prayer to Men - Alex Krislov
                            Dead Singers - MM
                            The Swastika Set-Up - MM
                            The Longford Cup - MM
                            The Entropy Circuit - MM
                            Interlude: Miss Brunner and Jerry - Giles Gordon
                            The Repossession of Jerry Cornelius - John Clute
                            Niki Hoeky - Charles Partington
                            Everything Blowing Up - Hilary Bailey
                            The Entropy Tango (fragment) - lyrics MM; music Pete Pavli & MM
                            The Murderer's Song - MM
                            The Gangrene Collection - MM
                            The Roumanian Question - MM
                            Bruised Time - Simon Ings
                            Jerry and Miss Brunner at the Beginning - LJ
                            All the Way Round Again - MM <= This story isn't in the Trade paperback
                            Jerry Cornelius: A Reader's Guide - John Clute
                            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for checking that, Guy!

                              For what it's worth, I found my copy on ebay, when a typo had me searching for "morcock." Since the seller didn't pay attention to spelling in their listing, no one else saw it. I think it went for about $20. A similar thing happened when I found my hardcover of Warlord of the Air, except that was on ABE.

                              Demos, now you can rest easy knowing that at least one person will enjoy their holiday gift from you. :lol:

                              And thanks for the scans, Guy. You've lessened my guilt about not (finally) wiring up my scanner. :oops:

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X