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Freebooter Amongst the Salvage (or, What i Did On My Hols)

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  • Freebooter Amongst the Salvage (or, What i Did On My Hols)

    10 days of cycling around the Clyde estuary and out to the Inner Hebrides, with my trusty, Taiwanese, folding bike.

    Great stuff.

    I raided the charity, secondhand and recycle shops on the return stretch. Starting with charity shops in my hometown. So, what did I come up with?

    Thin pickings to start off with. My first book purchase was merely a Penguin edition of Love in Amsterdam, by Nicolas Freeling. The first van der Valk novel.

    Then, I had a bit of luck, Grafton editions of The Sailor on the Seas of Fate and The King of Swords, By Mike. :)

    I thought that would be about it, but I was just passing a charity shop, that I'd already checked out, when I glanced in the window and spotted a pristine, Simon and Schuster, hard back, 1st edition of Silverheart, by Michael Moorcock and Storm Constantine. :D

    Anyway, that was that, until I stopped off in Glasgow, to spend a night in the Glasgow youth hostel, before catching an early flight home, the following morning. I spotted a secondhand bookshop, specializing in SF, close by and popped in. I came away with a Granada edition of, Elric at the End of Time. :)

    I got home and that would be that, apart from picking up half a dozen early Jackie Chan movies, on DVD, for a Euro each (which like the van der Valk, doesn't really count), except that I dropped some books off at the local recycle shop and checked out their English book section. I came up with a nice, if brittle, Compact SF edition of, one hundred and two H BOMBS, by Thomas M. Disch. Not by Mike, but a fascinating collection of Disch's early short stories and a cracking find, none the less.

    The most I spent for a book was آ£3.00 and the least was, €0.20. So, keep looking kids... and get your eye in!

  • #2
    I love book bargains. 102 H Bombs is a great book to have. I bought a copy a few months ago - although I used to have this and Disch's Panther/Granada books I can't find any of them and can't recall selling them either :?

    If memory serves, from older threads, Mike was instrumental in getting 102 H Bombs into print in the first place.
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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    • #3
      I went to pick up my nephew from Schiphol airport today. On the return journey, we popped into the Slegte Boekenwinkel in Leiden where we valiantly liberated copies of a hard back edition of The Revenge of the Rose (Grafton Books, 1991), somebody's ripped out the blank frontpages (probably to disguise its origin in a library) and a paperback ed. of Legends From the End of Time The Tale of The Eternal Champion. Vol. 11. All under the €15 and v. happy about it. The lovely Robert Gould cover of The Revenge of the Rose is preserved in library quality plastic. :D

      The nephew picked up a nice copy of The Essential Calvin and Hobbes so he's also quite well pleased.

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      • #4
        Well, I've had similar luck after a weekend in the Yorkshire Dales. To escape from the rain (it was Yorkshire after all) we found a book sale & I got a copy of Gloriana, one I'd missed from donkey's years ago. A graphic novel version of The Weird of the White Wolf, part 1 & a large format version of Elric at the End of Time. Not bad & there was a good pub over the road as well! :)
        Arioch, aid me! Blood and souls for Arioch!

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        • #5
          A month, or two, back, I picked up the first two series of Star Trek (complete, on VHS), from the local Recycle shop, for about €20.

          Talk about nostalgic!

          I popped back in today and picked up some books, chiefly: 'Helliconia Spring & Winter' (no sign of 'Helliconia Summer'), by Brian Aldiss; 'We the Living', by Ayn Rand (haud me back!); 'The Second Sex', by Simone de Beauvoir (finally!); and 'Poem of the CID' (that's nice, I thought, that can go alongside my copy of the 'Z Cars' novelization), which turned out to be 'Poema Del Cid', original text and also translated by W.S. Merwin (one doesn't come across mediæval epic literature everyday). There were also a couple of SF pulps, including a Murray Leinster, all for for €1.40.



          This was all in the Netherlands, so remember, there's pop.cultural treasure out there, just waiting to be discovered! Keep searching the garbage skows, keep hunting in the remaindered bins!
          Last edited by Pietro_Mercurios; 06-30-2006, 03:23 PM.

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          • #6
            That Elric at the End of Time was the first edition, illustrated by Rodney Matthews. In fact I wrote it for Rodney to illustrate. Fairly hard to come by now, I'd say.
            Yes, I published 102 H-Bombs, which I think was Tom's first short story collection and a bit of a rarity. Compact, of course.
            You're doing well out there, pards!
            Some of the best Disch titles were done in Vintage recently in the USA.
            He's great.

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

            Comment


            • #7
              Yesterday we went down to St. Pete to drop off a camera for repair, and popped into Haslam's where I found Best SF Stories from New Worlds 3, 1970, edited by MM, of course. My first NW find of any kind browsing a bookstore
              Included:
              In Passage of the Sun George Collyn
              Multi-Value Motorway Brian W Aldiss
              The Great Clock Langdon Jones
              The Post-Mortem People Peter Tate
              The Disaster Story Charles Platt
              The Heat Death of the Universe Pamela Zoline
              Coranda Keith Roberts
              The Soft World Sequence George MacBeth
              Kazoo James Sallis
              Integrity PF Woods
              last, but not least-
              The Mountain James Colvin

              By the looks of the intro, it should be a great read
              Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
              -Yousuf Karsh

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              • #8
                Rose, it may interest you to learn that the 'Coranda' story by Keith Roberts happens to be set in the world of Mike's 'The Ice Schooner'. So while it's not a straight piece of Moorcockiana, it is an interesting adjunct. :)
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by David Mosley
                  Rose, it may interest you to learn that the 'Coranda' story by Keith Roberts happens to be set in the world of Mike's 'The Ice Schooner'. So while it's not a straight piece of Moorcockiana, it is an interesting adjunct. :)
                  David, these tidbits always interest me
                  Thank you!
                  Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
                  -Yousuf Karsh

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I worked with Keith closely when I was doing The Ice Schooner, as he was then the editor of Science Fantasy which originally serialised the story. Keith so liked the world that he wrote at least one story (I had an idea it was two) set in same locations. Later, I returned the favour with Keith and helped edit him. It was actually a very good professional friendship which went on for a couple of years or more. That's why the novel The Ice Schooner is dedicated to 'Keith Roberts, Master Steersman'. He was an excellent editor of Science Fantasy though never officially editor, though he did all the work during both Kyril Bonfiglioli's regime and Harry Harrison's. He never felt he should take the No. 1 job because of moral quibbles, though I was always trying to get him to make official what he'd been doing through almost the entire run of SF/Impulse. Keith was a depressive and when he got diabetis he eventually lost both legs and basically just sat there until he died, though originally supported by some tremendous fans. But he was also paranoid and, as with almost everyone, eventually turned against the people who were helping him most. It became very difficult to be his friend in those final years. Am I wrong but was 'The Wreck of the Kissing Bitch' set in that same world, too ? Anyone read it ?

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just a reminder, Keith Roberts also wrote what must be one of the greatest pieces of 'What If?', 'Alternative History', speculative fiction.

                      Pavane (1968-ish)

                      See also:
                      http://www.rbd26.dial.pipex.com/pavane.htm
                      http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...643181-1438840
                      http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/pavane.htm
                      & etc.

                      Good book.

                      A World where in Britain, Elizabeth I was assasinated, the Spanish Armada was victorious and the Protestant Reformation was headed off by the Church of Rome. Feudalism rules the Inquisition is to be expected and Scientific Progress has been slowed down to a crawl.

                      Originally serialised in New Worlds.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                        Am I wrong but was 'The Wreck of the Kissing Bitch' set in that same world, too ? Anyone read it ?
                        No, you're not wrong, Mike. :) 'Kissing Bitch' appears in "Warlocks and Warriors" (ed. Douglas Hill, 1971), alongside the original novella version of 'The Sleeping Sorceress'.

                        Keith also painted the first cover for 'The Ice Schooner' for it's serialisation in SF impulse.

                        Last edited by David Mosley; 07-01-2006, 02:36 PM.
                        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                        Comment

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