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The best Cornelius book?

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  • The best Cornelius book?

    As a Moorcock reader of thirty years standing, and a fan of the Cornelius books in general.....well perhaps "fan" isn't really a strong enough word....."utterly obsessed" is probably nearer the mark....where was I? Oh yes, as a long standing reader who has had to go through life apparently alone with my obsession, it was with some exitement that I came across this forum.

    A whole forum dedicated to chatting about MM!!! At last i've found some soul-mates. :lol: And as you can imagine, i've got about a million questions....but i'm going to try not to babble and just start off with one.

    What is your favourite Jerry Cornelius book? And why?

  • #2
    Gotta be the Condition of Muzak, for bringing all the themes and the previous 3 books together. I usually read all 4 together, starting at the Condition of Muzak, then breaking off to goto Final Programme, back into CoM, etc (almost as obsessed (and old ) as you, Shaky Mo).
    \"Killing me won\'t bring back your apples!\"

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    • #3
      Hi Shaky!

      I'd have to say Gold Diggers, if only because I was born on the Silver Jubilee so I've always had a slightly narcissistic interest in the celebrations that occurred on my b-day, and the punks' reactions to it. I think a lot of the discussions in the book are still very relevant today (perhaps more so) since we seem to have a lot of faux-punks running around, and a lot of people who like to draw anarchy symbols but can't be bothered looking the word up in an encyclopaedia! It also contains all of the conspiracy and counter-conspiracy we've come to expect from the Cornelius books... ooh, and as an added bonus, Mitzi actually gets a few decent lines here and there, rather than just being left to hold the dildo. Good girl.

      Also, you could argue your namesake was the "star" of the book! :)

      D...
      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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      • #4
        DeeCrowSeer wrote:
        I'd have to say Gold Diggers, if only because I was born on the Silver Jubilee so I've always had a slightly narcissistic interest in the celebrations that occurred on my b-day, and the punks' reactions to it.
        Aaawww! Now that makes me feel old, especially since I bought the Virgin paperbacks "Great Rock'n'Roll Swindle" (as it was then) when fresh off the press :oops: .

        More interesting, DCS, was the wedding of the millennium which took place when you probably had white socks and shorts on - given all the hagiography that's gone on since 1997, it's instructive to think back to reactions to the wedding of big ears and the walking tapeworm :D .

        This does not get you any further, though, Shakey Mo. Read the lot (in order of publication), that's the answer!
        \"Killing me won\'t bring back your apples!\"

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        • #5
          I feel old too, I have the newspaper edition of Great Rock and Roll Swindle... I bought it from Virgin Records in Birmingham in the early 80s. They had a whole stack of them, should have bought em all.

          My favourite Cornelius depends on my mood - Final Programme is like straight(ish) sf adventure, Cure For Cancer is quite weird and I like it a lot, English Assassin I sometimes take a while to get into. Overall I'd say probably Condition of Muzak for the reasons mentioned by zakt.
          'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

          Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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