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Jerico'sFreakOutThread

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  • Jerico'sFreakOutThread

    (InspiredBytheCKdoTheBreakDownBoogie!)

    I created this thread so that I can can post
    stuff that I want to write about that are not
    questions to MM and so he need not look
    at them (save him a little time)!

    here's an eMail I got recently (I added a bunch of my own [editorial] additional text....

    [No Title. Author: some old-school Middle America Schmuck who doesn't have a post-highschool education (my guess only)]

    Maybe you'd like to hear about something other than idiot Reservists and
    > naked Iraqis.
    >
    > Maybe you'd like to hear about a real American, somebody who honored the uniform he wears.
    > Meet Brian Chontosh. Churchville-Chili Central School class of 1991.
    Proud graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology. Husband and
    about-to-be father. First lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. And a genuine hero.
    > The secretary of the Navy said so yesterday. At 29 Palms in California
    > Brian Chontosh was presented with the Navy Cross, the second highest
    award for combat bravery the United States can bestow. That's a big deal. But you won't see it on the network news tonight, and all you read in Brian's hometown newspaper was two paragraphs of nothing. Instead, it was more blather about some mental defective MPs who acted like animals. The odd fact about the American media in this war is that it's not covering the American military. The most plugged-in nation in the world is receiving virtually no true information [really?] about what its warriors are doing.
    [Do we need to know what they normally do? If you know or knew anyone in the military, they can tell you. I'm an ex-Marine and I can tell you that they sit around a lot, until they get another task they are ordered to fulfill, and execute 'til completed.]
    Oh, sure, there's a body count. We know how many Americans have fallen. And we see those same casket pictures day in and day out. And we're almost on a first-name basis with the pukes who abused the Iraqi prisoners. And we know all about improvised explosive devices and how we lost Fallujah and what Arab public-opinion polls say about us and how the world hates us. We get
    > a non-stop feed of gloom and doom. But we don't hear about the heroes. The incredibly brave GIs who honorably do their duty. The ones our grandparents would have carried on their shoulders down Fifth Avenue. [The world that your grandparents struggled in is quite different than what we have today, so you ought not always agree with their point-of-view. Perhaps you ought to just think about things more.]
    The ones we completely ignore. [Are we really ignoring them? Who are they again? Sorry, there are millions of people in the world. Sorry if I don't know all of them.] Like Brian Chontosh.
    > It was a year ago on the march into Baghdad. Brian Chontosh was a platoon leader rolling up Highway 1 in a humvee. When all hell broke loose. Ambush city. The young Marines were being cut to ribbons. [Really? Sounds like a significant part of that 700+ killed; all in one battle!] Mortars, machine guns, rocket propelled grenades. And the kid out of Churchville was in charge. It s
    do or die and it was up to him. [All on his shoulders, eh? Wow. What a burden!] So he moved to the side of his column, looking for a way to lead his men to safety. As he tried to poke a hole through the Iraqi line his humvee came under direct enemy machine gun fire. [Not descriptive enough. Not sure what's going on here. Obviously, this guy wasn't there.] It was fish in a barrel and the Marines were the fish. And
    Brian Chontosh gave the order to attack. [Surprising! Considering he was under enemy fire!] He told his driver to floor the
    humvee directly at the machine gun emplacement that was firing at them. And he had the guy on top with the .50 cal unload on them. [Shame that the gunner had to wait for the order!] Within moments
    there were Iraqis slumped across the machine gun and Chontosh was still advancing, ordering his driver now to take the humvee directly into the Iraqi trench that was attacking his Marines. [They dig trenches over there? Is he mixing up Operation Iraqui freedom with WWII Normandy?] Over into the battlement the humvee went and out the door Brian Chontosh bailed, carrying an M16 and a Beretta and 228 years of Marine Corps pride. And he ran down the trench.
    With its mortars and riflemen, machineguns and grenadiers. And he
    killed them all. [I didn't know the "insurgents" had that much artillery and munitions!] He fought with the M16 until it was out of ammo. Then he
    fought with the Beretta until it was out of ammo. Then he picked up a dead man's AK47 [famous Commie weapon] and fought with that until it was out of ammo. Then he picked up another dead man's AK47 and fought with that until it was out of ammo. At one point
    he even fired a discarded Iraqi RPG into an enemy cluster, sending attackers flying with its grenade explosion. [Wow incredible trench warfare going on in the same single trench!] When he was done Brian Chontosh had cleared
    200yards of entrenched Iraqis from his platoon's flank. He had
    killed more than 20 and wounded at least as many more. But that's
    probably not how he would tell it. He would probably merely say that his Marines were in trouble, and he got them out of trouble. Hoo-ah, and drive on. [The Hummer survived? Wow! Oh by the way, it's "OO-RAH!"]

    "By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in
    the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, 1st Lt. Chontosh reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval
    Service."
    >
    That's what the citation says. And that's what nobody will hear.
    That's what doesn't seem to be making the evening news. Accounts of American valor are dismissed by the press as propaganda, yet accounts of American ifficulties are heralded as objectivity. It makes you wonder if the role of the media is to inform, or to depress ? to report or to deride.
    > To tell the truth, or to feed us lies. [Please be more specific when you make this kind of accusation.]
    I guess it doesn't matter.
    > We're going to turn out all right
    THE END

    I dunno. I kind of don't buy the story. Maybe he should have got someone who can write well to type up his message.

    The more I learn, the more I dislike the word "hero." The way it's used most frequently makes it sound inherently disingenuous. I'm more inclined to use the word hero if someone rescues a drowning child.
    To call someone a "hero" who kills a bunch of Iraquis in a preemptive invasion in the service of corrupt USA interests, is more like a "Pawn of the Neo-cons" to me.
    If you want to know a definition of "hero" that makes sense to me, read
    comics. Specifically read my favorite: "Martial Law: Fear and Loathing" by Pat Mills and Kevin O'Neill...

    http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/marshlaw.htm
    \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
    Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

  • #2
    Well, Jerico, let's assume for the sake of argument that the story is basically true. In that case, Chontosh is a hero in my opinion because he carried out his duties with courage and honor. It doesn't matter why he was sent there; the fact is he was sent and he did his duty to the best of his ability, despite overwhelming odds.

    That said, I must agree with you that the word "hero" has become rather trite. A professional athlete is not a hero; a volunteer surgeon in a third-world country is a hero. John Wayne was not a hero; Alexander Fleming was a hero.

    I am reminded of a Rush song:

    Hero--
    Saves a drowning child
    Cures a wasting disease
    Hero --
    Lands the crippled airplane
    Solves great mysteries
    Hero --
    Not the handsome actor who plays a hero's role
    Hero --
    Not the glamour girl who'd love to sell her soul
    If anybody's buying,
    Nobody's hero

    Hero --
    Is the voice of reason against the howling mob
    Hero --
    Is the pride of purpose in the unrewarding job
    Hero --
    Not the champion player who plays the perfect game
    Hero -- not the glamour boy who loves to sell his name
    Everybody's buying,
    Nobody's hero


    --Excerpted from Nobody's Hero from the Rush LP, Counterparts
    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

    Comment


    • #3
      cool! thanks for the reply, Kman!
      \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
      Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with most of your editorial (especially as an ex-soldier).

        I think the tone of the original email projects the narrow view of the world that it's writer holds. I surely believe that the Lt. was a hero, but is that supposed to supercede the importance of the bigger issues? I can put it in personal terms. If the university where I work was shutting down because of a budget crisis, I wouldn't expect our school paper to cover me winning a teaching award.

        What the author fails to consider is that most of what is happening in Iraq is bad. The media are simply reporting the situation. I wonder if he/ she complained when our jingoistic "embedded reporters" were waving the flag beside the troops, or when Pat Tilman was the lead story for three news days.

        I didn't realize the media was required to be blindly patriotic, or avoid big picture stories because it might be bad for morale, or focus on happy news because it might pick the troops up. Give the people on the front lines some credit. Distorting what is happening on the ground in Iraq is good for no one, least of all the troops. Some people need to remember that the media didn't create this situation, or the bad news coming from it; our President did. Don't get angry with the people who report the bad news. Get angry with the people who created the mess.

        Comment


        • #5
          You bet, Jer.

          I should mention that Fleming, when presented with the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1945 for his discovery of penicillin, said humbly, "Nature makes penicillin; I just found it."

          Perhaps humility may be part and parcel with heroism?
          "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
          --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

          Comment


          • #6
            Doc, thanks!

            PWV, Yeah I'd agree with that.

            I like to think there really is such
            a thing called altruism.
            In that way, I am an optimist.
            \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
            Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

            Comment


            • #7
              Origin of the Break Down Boogie?

              "What is the the CK Breakdown Boogie?" you ask.

              I know Von Weiner knows!

              It originated on pg. 11 of the infamous
              Current Affairs Q&A thread...

              [broken link]]

              So c'mon, y'all! Come and breakitdown with me!

              Do the Howard Dean battle cry:

              "Yiiiiiiaaaaaaaaw!"

              (Being highly educated has it's downsides :roll: )
              Last edited by Rothgo; 04-09-2010, 12:23 PM.
              \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
              Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

              Comment


              • #8
                I liked the bit about 'He ran down the trench, with it's mortars and machine guns'. Now you'd have to be a pretty stupid Iraqi to attack a guy in the same trench as you with a mortar.

                BTW - yes, trenches are still used in war - if you're infantry you don't just stand there on the horizon like a target. Especially if you don't have kevlar flak jackets and hi-tec helmets.

                Another reason you won't hear a story like that on the news is that we like to pretend our wars our fought with precision guided laser weaponry that destroys tanks without turning 17 year old conscripts into jam.

                The truth is that while there are many people in the UK or UK who supported the war because they felt it was necessary, most don't really want to know the details of the actual combat. Maybe stories like this should be published, as it would really bring it home. It wasn't just about toppling statues and finding Saddam hidden in a hole in the ground, but about killing thousands of human beings to do so.

                Comment


                • #9
                  sure. As long as someone who can write does the stories!

                  Kind of makes me wish I saw combat. I can always re-enlist...

                  Naw! HELL NO!!! :lol:
                  \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                  Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Personally, this sounds like one of those emails that occassionally floats around as "true", but is really something drafted as a kneejerk response to news that seems overwhelmingly focused on one aspect of a big issue.

                    "I think the tone of the original email projects the narrow view of the world that it's writer holds. I surely believe that the Lt. was a hero, but is that supposed to supercede the importance of the bigger issues?"

                    No it isn't, but the writer's narrow view isn't any less valid than the narrow view of those whose sole focus is to have an impeachment hearing at all costs. Neither is wrong, although neither is likely part of the best course of action for the nation or the best way to change the current situation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Psychic, do you watch the Sopranos?

                      This last week Christopher arrives late for a meeting with Tony and Silvio (played by Little Steven Van Zandt) and Tony goes "Christopher, where the f*** were you?". Christopher sits down and says "T, the highway was jammed with broken heroes on a last chance power drive."

                      For some reason I thought that hilarious.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Naw, don't have cable currently...

                        That is a great line. Nice to know Christopher (or at least one writer for The Sopranos) likes Springsteen. I wonder how many of the younger Sopranos-watchers even caught the reference.
                        "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                        --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm not really a Sopranos fan.

                          But they killed the hot-chick last episode!

                          poo-poo! :x :( :!:

                          Anything short of Tony
                          dying or getting his balls chopped off
                          ultimately sends out the wrong message
                          to the world.
                          \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                          Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Do you watch? He isn't dead yet and although I have no direct knowledge, I believe he still has his balls, but the message is pretty clear to anyone with half a brain. His is not a charmed life.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Don't mean to interrpupt the Sopranos, but...

                              Originally posted by Bill
                              The looks of a candidate are the symptom of everything we have been talking about here for the last couple weeks. Remember? Carter was supposed to be a "peanut farmer from south Georgia", conveniently forgetting his Naval career and gubernatorial achievements, among others. Reagan was dismissed as an "actor", again despite his gubernatorial achievements.

                              Pronouncing "nuc-u-lar" or falling off a bike are no more indicative of presidential capability (or lack thereof) than the color of his shoes. Or Dean's yell. Or Kerry's achingly reverential "My fellow Americans, if I am elected to be your leader" nonsense in every speech he gives.

                              Look at it this way. Would you like Bush any more if he started saying "nuc-le-ar"?
                              I had to jump in to say that I mostly agree with you. I think we've (as a society?) reduced politicians--even Presidents--to convenient bumper stickers.

                              My problem is when we're hypocrictical about judging the images we create. That was my point when I mentioned Bush's phonetical challenges. He's not Presidential in a conventional sense, and that seems to be OK by conventional wisdom, but others don't get the same benefit of the doubt. A better way to say what I'm thinking: We've become too content with image and care nothing about depth. That makes things too messy, because we're faced with contradictions. The shallow image doesn't really tell the story, but we've substituted it for the whole story. That's why Kerry (who really does look like he could be on the $20 bill-good call PWV) is "a flip-flopper", and Bush is a "man of conviction." This can easily turn into Kerry is a man of thoughtful consideration and Bush is a hard-headed single-minded fool. Neither of these are really accurate, but that's what we've allowed politics to become (which I think was Bill's original point).

                              Once again I've decided to rant on Jer's freak-out territory :oops: :D

                              By the way, one of the only redeeming qualities I find in Bush is that he seems much more like a real person than any President since Jimmy Carter, nuc-u-lar, or not.

                              Comment

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