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Is North Americas Goose Cooked?

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  • Is North Americas Goose Cooked?

    I was afraid that I would be reading this article one day.Considering the migratory patterns of our lovely geese and the vast expanses of their travels, Im afraid that this article falls short of envisioning the true impact of these findings.
    Stem Bird Flu on Island
    June 19 (Bloomberg) -- Canada widened quarantine measures to contain bird flu on Prince Edward Island, where an infected gosling was found on a farm last week.
    Tests are under way to check if the virus is the H5N1 strain that has killed more than 140 million poultry and at least 129 people, mainly in Asia. A neighboring property was quarantined to prevent a spread of the virus, identified as an H5 subtype of avian influenza, Marc Richard, a spokesman for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, said yesterday.
    ``The neighbor also has chickens, and since it's a contagious disease, we've gone in, ordered them not to move, have taken samples from the chickens and sent those off to the lab to be analyzed,'' Richard said in a phone interview from Ottawa. ``There is zero indication of disease'' on the second farm.
    Animal health officials worldwide are monitoring for H5N1, described by some scientists as the most lethal avian flu strain yet recorded, which has spread to almost 40 countries in Asia, Europe and Africa this year. Diseased fowl increase the risk for humans and create more opportunity for the virus to mutate into a pandemic form capable of killing millions of people.
    The H5N1 virus has infected at least 227 people in 10 countries since late 2003, the Geneva-based World Health Organization said on June 16.
    Almost all human cases have been linked to close contact with sick or dead birds, such as children playing with them or adults butchering them or plucking feathers, according to the WHO. Thorough cooking of meat and eggs kills the virus.
    Hungarian Cull
    Hungarian officials slaughtered 3,000 more domestic poultry over the weekend on concern they were exposed to the virus, the Magyar Nemzet newspaper reported today, citing Miklos Suth, Hungary's chief veterinarian.
    A farmer in the southern town of Szank raised the alarm after noticing one of his geese behaved strangely, according to the report. Veterinary officials culled all 700 birds at the farm and 2,300 others in a one-kilometer (0.62 mile) radius, the newspaper said.
    In Indonesia, which reported its 50th human case last week, authorities must cull more poultry to arrest bird flu. The disease has spread across two-thirds of the country's provinces and killed more than one person a week this year.
    ``We have to do more preemptive culling, there's no alternative,'' said Tri Satya Putri Naipospos, vice chairwoman of a government-appointed committee on avian and pandemic influenza. Laws are needed to force farmers to slaughter infected flocks and poultry at risk of infection, she told reporters today in the capital, Jakarta.
    Human Risk
    The government's strategy of using vaccines, disinfecting coops and incinerating dead birds hasn't prevented the H5N1 avian influenza strain from becoming endemic in the country of 1.3 billion poultry.
    This week, Indonesian officials will meet representatives from United Nations agencies, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Epicentre France and Japan's National Institute for Infectious Diseases to assess the country's avian flu situation. Health experts will be asked to provide recommendations to the government and develop strategies for the rapid response and containment of outbreaks, the WHO said last week.
    The H5N1 virus is one of 16 H5 subtypes. Only viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes are known to cause the highly pathogenic form of the disease. Not all viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes are highly pathogenic and not all will cause severe disease in poultry, according to the WHO.
    The United Nations health agency said H5 and H7 viruses are probably introduced to poultry flocks in their low pathogenic form. When allowed to circulate in poultry populations, the viruses can mutate, usually within a few months, into the highly pathogenic form.
    Last edited by voilodian ghagnasdiak; 06-19-2006, 07:21 AM.

  • #2
    My personal opinion- news of this disease is another case of scaremongering, as far as any real threat to humans. At this point, it is not passed from human to human. The few people who died from it in China were in direct contact with infected chicken blood, AFAIK. I would think healthy fowl in the wild would be less susceptible than the cooped up, mistreated, unhealthy birds of the food industry.
    Even our general flu could mutate into something deadly.

    Again, just my humble, uneducated opinion
    I just refuse to be manipulated by the media, etc., about something like this.
    Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
    -Yousuf Karsh

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Madrigal Rose
      My personal opinion- news of this disease is another case of scaremongering, as far as any real threat to humans. At this point, it is not passed from human to human. The few people who died from it in China were in direct contact with infected chicken blood, AFAIK. I would think healthy fowl in the wild would be less susceptible than the cooped up, mistreated, unhealthy birds of the food industry.
      Even our general flu could mutate into something deadly.

      Again, just my humble, uneducated opinion
      I just refuse to be manipulated by the media, etc., about something like this.
      I don't see the point of fear... look at China. There's like one billion people there, as opposed to america's mere 300 million.
      So if only 126 people died in a region totalling over a billion, it might be safe to discern that a lot less damage could be caused in America or European countries. America's food handling practices might be better than in Asia, but then, if an infected sample gets past the preliminary check-ups... you can't always be sure with infectious diseases

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      • #4
        Madgrigal Rose:
        Even our general flu could mutate into something deadly.
        The flu epidemic of 1919 or 1920 killed more people than the First World War , so, yes.

        Comment


        • #5
          This topic isn't Q&A focused so it's been moved to Messages of the Day.
          Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Berry

            Comment


            • #7
              No problem. I hope you guys don't see it as a smack down or insult. I try to keep the Q&A Moorcock-centric. Also, I am inconsistent on what get's pitched out, so please forgive me.
              Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

              Comment


              • #8
                Absolutely no offence taken whatsoever. You are in charge of this website and we must respect your decisions.
                Is This More Scaremongering?
                Work begins on Arctic seed vault
                The Arctic seed vault will be built into mountain rock
                Norway is starting construction on a "doomsday vault" in the Arctic which is designed to house all known varieties of the world's crops.
                Dug into a frozen mountainside on the island of Svalbard, it is hoped the project will safeguard crop diversity in the event of a global catastrophe.
                More than 100 countries have backed the vault, which will store seeds, packaged in foil, at sub-zero temperatures.
                Prime Ministers from five nations helped lay the cornerstone on Monday.
                Premiers from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland attended the ceremony near the town of Longyearbyen, in Norway's remote Svalbard Islands, roughly 1,000 km (620 miles) from the North Pole.
                Secure facility
                Norway's Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg told the Norwegian news agency NTB: "The vault is of international importance. It will be the only one of its kind; all the other gene banks are of a commercial nature."
                Fenced in and guarded, with steel airlock doors, motion detectors and polar bears roaming outside - the concrete facility will, its backers say, be the most secure building of its type in the world.
                Norway's Agriculture Minister Terje Riis-Johansen has called the vault a "Noah's Ark on Svalbard."
                The vault's purpose is to ensure survival of crop diversity in the event of plant epidemics, nuclear war, natural disasters or climate change; and to offer the world a chance to restart growth of food crops that may have been wiped out.
                At temperatures of minus 18C (minus 0.4F), the seeds could last hundreds, even thousands, of years. Even if all cooling systems failed, explained Mr Riis-Johansen, the temperature in the frozen mountain would never rise above freezing due to the permafrost on the mountainside.
                Ultimate back-up
                The Global Crop Diversity Trust, founded in 2004, will help run the vault, which is planned to open and start accepting seeds from around the world in September 2007. The bank is eventually expected to house some three million seeds.
                This is polar bear country
                "This facility will provide a practical means to re-establish crops obliterated by major disasters," Cary Fowler, executive secretary of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, said in a statement.
                Fowler, who led a feasibility study on the project, said crop diversity was also threatened by "accidents, mismanagement, and short-sighted budget cuts".
                Already, some 1,400 seed banks around the world, most of them national, hold samples of a country's crops. But these banks "can be affected by shutdowns, natural disasters, war or simply a lack of money," said Mr Riis-Johansen.
                While Norway will own the vault itself, countries sending seeds will own the material they deposit - much as with a bank safe-deposit box. The Global Crop Diversity Trust will help developing countries pay the cost of preparing and sending seeds.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by voilodian ghagnasdiak
                  Absolutely no offence taken whatsoever. You are in charge of this website and we must respect your decisions.
                  Is This More Scaremongering?
                  Actually, short of some miracle, I believe this will come in handy some day. Weird thing is, when I saw your post about it, I had just come home, and had been listening to this in my car.
                  Last edited by Madrigal Rose; 06-20-2006, 06:49 AM.
                  Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
                  -Yousuf Karsh

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    originally posted by voilodian ghagnasdiak;
                    Absolutely no offence taken whatsoever. You are in charge of this website and we must respect your decisions.
                    Is This More Scaremongering?
                    Am I the only one who read this story and immediately thought of Bolvangar in Phillip Pullman's Northern Lights? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norther...ts_%28novel%29

                    Although the reality has an infinitely less sinister purpose to Pullman's facility. I think that it's a good idea, but what would it actually be used for? In the event of ecological collapse, do you think anyone would be able to make it all the way up to the Arctic and back? Surely we'd just forget the thing even existed?

                    By the way, how do you incorporate links into the text, like;

                    originally posted by Madrigal Rose;
                    Weird thing is, when I saw your post about it, I had just come home, and had been listening to this in my car.
                    I was able to do it on the other fora, but I can't figure it out here for some reason

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hawksun
                      By the way, how do you incorporate links into the text, like;

                      I was able to do it on the other fora, but I can't figure it out here for some reason
                      It's worlds easier here: click on the little globe/chain link (under the smiley). Peice of cake.
                      Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
                      -Yousuf Karsh

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hawksun
                        Am I the only one who read this story and immediately thought of Bolvangar in Phillip Pullman's Northern Lights? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norther...ts_%28novel%29

                        Although the reality has an infinitely less sinister purpose to Pullman's facility. I think that it's a good idea, but what would it actually be used for? In the event of ecological collapse, do you think anyone would be able to make it all the way up to the Arctic and back? Surely we'd just forget the thing even existed?
                        I don't know this book, but the idea did trigger a Sci-Fi feeling for me.
                        Reminded that I still have to read Ballard's The Drowned World.
                        Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
                        -Yousuf Karsh

                        Comment

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