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Hate my Job Blues

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  • Hate my Job Blues

    Ok. So im gonna post my gripe here and maybe get some advice or comments on my situation. Im a Photocopier technician. Ive been doing it for going on 5 years now. I have numerous certifications and an extensive amount of training. I hate my job. I make crappy money, i have to deal with cranky customers all day who dont seem to understand that every once in a while i may not have a part the machine needs on me, or that sometimes we can be stumped by a problem and may need to do more research. Im 22 years old, Married, never went to college due to my parents divorce and lack of money right around the time of my graduation. I went straight from High School to the workforce. I want to get out of this field and into something else. I dont want more money. I just want a job where i wont have to take my stress home with me everynight, and ruin my family life. I know all jobs carry a certain amount of stress, but when you have customers who have been down for less than 1 day calling your manager and bitching or leaving you voicemails 24/7 wanting to know why they arent up and running yet it gets to be a little excessive. I want a job where i have a specific task to do everyday, i clock out at the end of the day with my work finished and get to start fresh the next day with a new task. Not having 20 calls accumulate in your box because you receive them quicker than you can close them out. Mainly i just needed to vent and this is really the only place i can do it. However,Any advice would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Two words: Computers.
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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    • #3
      First off, McT, I hope this forum isn't really the only place you can let off steam. Tapping keys doesn't work off enough tension - go see a concert and get drunk!

      I don't want to come over negative but over the last 20 years I've been in catering, teaching, retail and industry and I never found the perfect job. For that you'll have to read the ads in the Tanelorn Daily Trumpet but it's hard to find a copy in this continuum.
      Teaching was the one that gave me the most satisfaction. It only takes 2 or 3 good students out of 50 to make the whole scolastic year worthwhile. By "good" I don't mean they get top marks, I mean they listen and learn and ask intelligent questions. That's the reward from teaching. Plus long Summer holidays!
      But I think Berry and theAlderian have the answer - go study something in the computer field. Anything from programming to web design or network management (although the latter will probably lead to a job where you need at least 2 pagers and 3 cell-phones).

      PS: Just for your info, today is a local holiday so I'm in the office with the cleaners and no-one else. Don't get into Quality Management.
      PS2: They say life begins at 40 but I was 42 on Sunday and I'm still waiting...

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      • #4
        I acn only advise you to find out what your real strengths are and gradually strengthen them, improve them even. Something to be proud of, even little things. Don't tell anybody before you're ready, so you don't jhave to put up with more expectations, and loss of face /faith if you don't succeed as soon as projected. With more selfconfidence you can probably find a way out. You're still very young, don't give up!
        Google ergo sum

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advice everyone. I guess its just a matter of getting out of the rut im in and making some changes.

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          • #6
            How about working in a public library? As long as you avoid having too much managerial responsibility, that would be rewarding, but not necessarily the kind of job that you take home with you. It's got computers, but some human interaction too. Perhaps it's the perfect job for anyone? Or maybe that's just wishful thinking on my part, since I'm studying at a library school right now...
            You can't spell "politically correct" without "correct".

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            • #7
              Could I tempt you into some form of social work? I work with adults with learning disabilities, which can be very rewarding. You can check out if you like this sort of thing by doing a bit of voluntary work - then a job in day services or a residential home if you like it and eventually get qualified. Then have a nervous breakdown and become a service-user (only kidding!) Just a thought. :)
              \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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              • #8
                I just read a study by social psychologists Robert Sinclair and Carrie Levis, from the University of Alberta (Edmonton). Maybe would fit better in Theocrat's Kaizening thread but it seems that one died out :roll:
                This long - term study of the behavior, productivity, tendency to errors etc of the workers at an electronic parts company concludes that, despite the common belief (propaganda?), the most productive workers are the unhappy, stressed, over-pressured ones. The happy people seem to care less....
                Of course this may only apply to subordinate jobs, and I bet the happy workers' happiness has very few to do with their jobs at all in that case...
                But basically here's the conclusion: harassing your employees, overloading them with work, and making them feel insecure about their capacity to keep their job DOES have positive effects on productivity...any thoughts?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rymdolov
                  How about working in a public library? As long as you avoid having too much managerial responsibility, that would be rewarding, but not necessarily the kind of job that you take home with you. It's got computers, but some human interaction too. Perhaps it's the perfect job for anyone? Or maybe that's just wishful thinking on my part, since I'm studying at a library school right now...
                  I would absolutely LOVE to work in the Library. I keep looking for an opening but there never seems to be one. Plus i dont know that they make very good money. I need at least what im making now to get by.

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                  • #10
                    How about following both Berry's and Rymodolov's suggestions, e.g. work on computerized archives/catalogues for big libraries?
                    You may get more money than the average librarian, too.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mordenkainen
                      How about following both Berry's and Rymodolov's suggestions, e.g. work on computerized archives/catalogues for big libraries?
                      You may get more money than the average librarian, too.
                      This is true this is true...Im going to look into this further.

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                      • #12
                        And she sure hates her job, too.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mordenkainen
                          I just read a study by social psychologists Robert Sinclair and Carrie Levis, from the University of Alberta (Edmonton). Maybe would fit better in Theocrat's Kaizening thread but it seems that one died out :roll:
                          This long - term study of the behavior, productivity, tendency to errors etc of the workers at an electronic parts company concludes that, despite the common belief (propaganda?), the most productive workers are the unhappy, stressed, over-pressured ones. The happy people seem to care less....
                          Of course this may only apply to subordinate jobs, and I bet the happy workers' happiness has very few to do with their jobs at all in that case...
                          But basically here's the conclusion: harassing your employees, overloading them with work, and making them feel insecure about their capacity to keep their job DOES have positive effects on productivity...any thoughts?
                          God help us! (the bastard, he doesn't exist...) Do you have a link to this?

                          Some features of 'lean production' (should be called 'mean production'?) have been dubbed 'management by stress'. Sounds like a 'low road' strategy to me - it might work for third world sweatshops, but can we seriously hope to compete on this basis?

                          Of course, in a sane society 'productivity' shouldn't be the god we've made of it. I certainly believe we should 'work to live', not 'live to work'. It would be interesting to know, incidentally, what these academics think is the cause of their own productivity! There's a classic book called 'Servants of Power' by Loren Baritz which looks at the contribution made by social scientists to super-exploiting the proles, From Frederick Winslow Taylor (father of 'scientific management') to this mob - it looks like nothing has changed!
                          \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mordenkainen
                            I just read a study by social psychologists Robert Sinclair and Carrie Levis, from the University of Alberta (Edmonton). Maybe would fit better in Theocrat's Kaizening thread but it seems that one died out :roll:
                            This long - term study of the behavior, productivity, tendency to errors etc of the workers at an electronic parts company concludes that, despite the common belief (propaganda?), the most productive workers are the unhappy, stressed, over-pressured ones. The happy people seem to care less....
                            Of course this may only apply to subordinate jobs, and I bet the happy workers' happiness has very few to do with their jobs at all in that case...
                            But basically here's the conclusion: harassing your employees, overloading them with work, and making them feel insecure about their capacity to keep their job DOES have positive effects on productivity...any thoughts?
                            Well i'm sorry that the Kaizenning post got vanquished. But i wrote something while drunk that i wasn't proud of (sounded like an agitator).
                            i tried to remove that message but ended up deleting the whole post.

                            I'll post the Pro's & Con's of kaizening and stress.

                            Kaizening may have positive effects on "worker productivity". But it's a killer on 'quality', 'absenteeism' and 'lost-time accidents'.
                            It all depends on how 'far' you go with the process.
                            Ever noticed how some "fair priced" electronics equipment stop working after only a few months/years? Or that the company, due to it's overzealous introspection, is not coming up with new inventions or innovative products? Just refinements that don't amount to much?

                            The international company i work at is using a leaning procedure called "Six Sigma". Which many industrialists think is too slow and not that effective as a "Kaizen Blitz", as they call it (http://www.advancedmanufacturing.com...04/parting.htm).

                            My company has raised profits form 6% to 10% in barely a year, which the company saw as good signs of progress. The ones who didn't agree where the 'stock brokers'. Many people are pissed at having their efforts be reduced to "short comings".
                            Miniscule sabotages on production have been known to proliferate amongst the workers. I see it sometimes and i really don't care if
                            they do it either. Many are also arguing that they don't care if they are out of a job or if the company fails and ships production to india.
                            But there are workers who fail to see that they are turning into B.S. entrepreneurs, and start viewing themselves as self-important people
                            ala Ayn Rand. Without percieving the real intentions the company has for them, and their 'real' views of the workforce.

                            It's not really about the 'leaning process', but it's due to the inept handling of it from management and leaders. Who are not psychologically equipt or resourcefull enough to be of any use to the process.

                            People need some distance from 'The Boss'. But they also need to communicate their requirements/specifications to do the job properly.

                            There is 'positive-stress' and then there is 'negative-stress'. Workers need a 'bar' to work towards to see a benefit for themselves so that it reduces the effects of negative-stress related diseases and mental complications. Raise the 'bar' too high and the workers will fall down.

                            Another major industrial swedish company saw benefits in letting the workforce rotate workplaces by themselves. And they could have a say when hiring new people had to be done. And they could also better plan their workschedule to fit their lives 'outside' of work. Which i think is a better approach than having the uncertainty of 'if i can get out of work that weekend so i can see my family or go to a consert with my friends'.

                            The other thing is the psycho-social enviroment that gets a boost.
                            Workers have to socialize and respect each other.
                            I've worked with 'lazy and insecure' people before.
                            And i wouldn't mind seeing them gone from the workplace.
                            That 'grumpy old man or women' doesn't have any place in this new production environment. Where the 'grumpy old man or women' scold new trainees for doing wrong. Give them something else to do.
                            Like an early retirement plan!

                            It's an interesting subject, and if you want to talk more about it please let me know!...

                            We wouldn't want our society turn into this:
                            http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3919775.stm
                            http://www.espacoacademico.com.br/044/44eueno_ing.htm
                            http://www.cannonadvantage.com/news0903.htm

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Theocrat
                              i wrote something while drunk that i wasn't proud of (sounded like an agitator).
                              What's wrong with that - have another one on me!

                              The whole issue of 'lean production' is a somewhat contradictory one. On the one hand it promised an empowered workforce, more involved in the process and engaged in satisfying tasks - at its worst extreme it entails an intensified form of Taylorism with intensified demands mediated through peer pressure. I think a good many western managers took trips to Japan, boggled at the increased commitment and productivity and tried to achieve the same thing at home without wanting to realise that what they had seen was part of a whole package involving such 'inflexible' concepts as lifetime employment (the high Japanese suicide rate being the downside of this).

                              You're right about 'negative stress'. Under-stimulation can be as bad as the opposite. I'm dealing with a case of it at present - a young woman in a department of middle-aged male timeservers who is suffering from stress-related depression partly because she has finished her work half way through the year (and partly because she is being discriminated against and bullied for upsetting the apple cart). Conventional economic theory assumes that humans are naturally lazy. It simply isn't true.
                              \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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