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The MWM Health Club

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  • The MWM Health Club

    Chaos Cafe--

    Kommando: Bagels and cream cheese for Arioch!

    Arioch: Do you know how many carbohydrates are in those bagels? And the cholesterol in the cream cheese...

    Enter Elric. He scans the crowd.

    Elric [sardonically]: Feast, Stormbringer! You want souls, here they are!

    Stormbringer: Just a moment, "Master". I'm reconsidering my diet. Turning over a new leaf-blade as it were. What's the fat content of these individuals? And what about sugar? Okay, Cymoril was a little more bitter than I thought, but some of these folks look pretty sweet to me. I've been putting on a bit of weight recently and frankly I'm getting rather tired of Mournblade's "heavy metal" jokes.

    Broody albino sighs and orders the squid.

    ************

    Welcome to the MWM Health Club thread.

    The inspiration for this comes from the thread "Reported Death of Valued Contributor to MWM" from which here are a few excerpts:

    Mr M:
    I'm taking a brisk walk every morning.
    Feel like joining me in a virtual walk ?
    I find it's best to cut out sweeteners along with sugar. It doesn't take long before you stop expecting sugar, but it's also easy to slip back into the habit, especially when feeling tired. Sugar fix feels like quick energy but it's an illusion in the end.
    Anyone else feel like making some sort of pledge, to honour Jerico's memory ?

    Berry:
    I'm in. I started taking a 1/2 hour walk around 2:30 pm on the soccer field across from my office. 5 mins warmup, 20 mins brisk walking and concentrating on breathing, and 5 mins warm down. See you on the field!

    Marie-Bernadette:
    Yes, I'd be glad to join you, virtually...So, yes, let's walk more, and remember Jerico when we do.

    Mr M:
    . . .I'm doing this largely because Linda's been looking after me for three years and I feel it's time she had a break! Well, I'm also doing it for myself. And I'm doing it out of respect for Jerico, who took good care of himself and was just plain unlucky. I love walking in cities or in wild country but hate walking here. I'm making myself do it. It's also very painful, because of my blocked artery, but the more I do it, the healthier I'm likely to become. It tickles me, too, to think of us all doing it more or less together! The MWM Health Club! They said it would never happen.
    So I thought it might be helpful to have a thread to discuss diet and exercise and encourage each other. We have other off-topic threads on subjects like politics, so how about one for health?
    WWED -- What Would Elric Do?

  • #2
    Well, a lot fits under "Miscellany", doesn't it?

    So for starters, from the hip:
    Green teas instead of black teas, supposedly good against developing cancer.
    An apple instead of cake or cookies when "little stealth-hunger" sneaks in. A glass of red wine a day against heart attacks, and taking out the dog(s) for a walk against inertia. (I don't know if it is the same taking out cats on a leash, but MM will be able to give advice in this ).
    Google ergo sum

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm all for taking care of yourself, but to some extent illness is hereditary. For example there is a history of cancer on my father's side - it killed my grandfather, while my father survived a bout of the same cancer several years ago and it's something I know could happen to me too.

      It's definitely good to cut out sugar - years ago I used to have two spoons in tea, but then I stopped and don't miss it at all. I still have one spoon in coffee but am trying to cut that out too. We are also trying to cut out bread and potato, which tends to make you feel very heavy. I am a bit overweight for my height and am trying to shed a few pounds too as I am hitting middle age :roll:

      It's amazing how much added sugar and other things there is in all kinds of packaged foods, even savoury ones, so the more you can cut out the better. We always have lots of garlic in meals and I think this definitely boosts your immune system, plus fruit and veg, although I've never been much out a fruit eater I'm trying to change. We had a meal with vegetables the other night without gravy and I actually enjoyed it a lot more - you could taste the veg!

      Despite all the good intentions though, we find it impossible to do without our weekly curry fix from the local takeaway
      'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

      Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

      Comment


      • #4
        I've started drinking some red wine every day. I was getting very bored of mineral water, so I'm also introducing orange juice (organic) and milk (semi-skimmed) in to the mix. Not sure how healthy all of that is, but it's staving off liquid-tedium so I'm all for it. Although I am technically vegetarian, I've recently re-introduced fish into my diet. Partly because it seems to give me more energy and partly because there are only so many cheese rolls a man can take. I've tried to cut down on wheat by having some porridge (oat-based goodness!) for breakfast, with dried fruit, instead of cereals. Um... I don't tend to eat chocolate as such, but maybe every now and then... once a week?

        I've started doing a few crunches, and half push-ups every morning, along with a few other exercises I don't know the names of. I've never done anything of the sort before, and for the first time in my life I have almost visible muscles!!! And I swear I'd have a six-pack if I could just get rid of the inch of fat which is cruelly concealing it. :) Now that the days are getting "longer", I will hopefully start walking off across the fields again... although I'll be casting a stink eye at all the dog-walkers who ruin the serenity of the beach with their yapping mutts. No offence! ;)

        Oh, and I try to eat kidney beans fairly often, because they're supposed to be good for the thickness of your hair. That's not really a health thing, but I thought I'd mention it anyway.

        Meditation is good for "exercising" your will-power muscles, and deep nasal breathing seems to give a giddy headrush akin to spinning round on the spot too many times (which is also fun, if you like that sort of thing).

        Um... do we have a sauna here?
        "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

        Comment


        • #5
          Clearly, it's time for PWV and I to start up the MWM martial arts classes again for fun and fitness! And Dee was supposed to be our prize recruit! :lol:

          LSN

          Comment


          • #6
            Transferred from Jerico's thread --

            It's hard to find decent chocolate in America but we get ours at Wholefoods 75% cocoa. Anything at 70% and over is supposed to be good for you, as you said, in the same way red wine is good for you.
            Actually a modest diet of red wine and good chocolate doesn't seem a bad diet! Some unsweetened oatmeal, made with non-fat milk, might be a good idea, too.
            Has anyone come up with a Gourmet Diet Guide ? Would seem to me to be a perfect title to add to all those thousands of others out there.
            I've noticed in the US that what is advertised as being full of flavour is often merely the addition of tons of sugar or salt. The very things which actually kill the palate. I agree that small amounts of very concentrated flavours is the best way to go. I used to advise people with a sweet tooth that if they needed sugar that badly not to order desert (this is in the US and UK) but to take a tiny amount of sugar on their tongue, which satisfies the desire without giving you fifty million extra calories. But we're talking here about trying to get rid of sugar in most things, so that when you DO feel like something sweet only a tiny
            amount will seem very sweet indeed. It doesn't take long to get rid of the addiction. It doesn't take long to re-acquire it, either!

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

            Comment


            • #7
              Chocolate from WholeFoods. Yum!

              With food and drink, I'm an anything in moderation kind of guy (as long as it's meatless). I also run 5k about three times a week and do a little strength training a few times a week, as well. When I run, the last 3/4 of a mile are always hardest for me, so I often try to find inspiration somehow. It is often my friend who survived breast cancer, and now it is often Jer.

              Comment


              • #8
                Apart from fell-walking, I used to walk everywhere, especially when I lived in London (most of my life). As a result when I was found to have a blocked artery in my right leg (which meant blood couldn't get down to the wound and let it heal normally) I at least had very good collaterals and my veins kicked in to work for my artery better than it might for others. However, I find walking around the grid of a town (all the land in these parts is privately owned and there is no conception of common land or rights of way in Texas!) to be miserably boring. I have to walk, to keep those veins working and keep blood flowing to the wound, so that's what I do, but there is no fun in it. Generally I take something to read or some work to do. I have to stop frequently, because walking is painful, and that's another advantage of the city or the fell -- where you can stop to window shop (or appear to) or to admire the view. Here, when I stop, all the bloody dogs start barking and people think I'm some sort of loony. They could be right, of course... :)

                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                Comment


                • #9
                  A few years ago Linda got addicted to weight training and actually tore the cartilege in her chest. She does yoga, these days, and has become very good at it. It keeps her fit, combined with a bit of rapid walking.

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    hmm, weight lifting is not that healthy. should at least be combined with a great deal of stretching. I recommend Pilates training method, at any age or level. It has deep and relatively quick effects on physical fitness and overall health.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mike, I remember from years ago that your good friend and New Worlds associate Mike (M. J.) Harrison was very much into climbing (and indeed write a novel Climbers about it). Was that something you were into as well?
                      'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                      Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've been avoiding this thread, cos it's a bit close to home...I'm something of an endorphin/ adrenaline junkie. The hazard of a previous life as a 'professional' fitness instructor, a former cycle-courier, and a regular multisport competitor. A good antidote to the tedious bits of being a Vet/ Researcher! I used to teach circuit training, aerobics, personal weight-training/ body conditioning in Covent Garden and at Bristol and Leeds Universities, and at a number of health clubs. I was a ninety-mile-a-day London Cycle Courier for a bit (it would have been sixty miles, but I got lost a lot....). At Uni, I was quite heavily into Martial Arts, and boxed in Manchester later on. My competitive sports are Running, fell and road, Cycling (mainly road TT's, but also ATB), Rowing, on-water and Concept-2, and Adventure Races. I'm OK at these, but rank highest nationally/ internationaly in Indoor Rowing (painful!); not that I particularly go for medals and that. I also climb (high mountains and Scottish/Welsh/ Alpine Winter, and some rock of course) and SCUBA dive. I train at least two hours a day - sometimes up to six: I used to do seven hours of pretty good quality work six days a week in my twenties (when I was a full-time student)! I 'watch' my food a bit - but I drink, eat bacon if I fancy it, in fact there isn't anything I 'don't eat': bouncing up mountains and to places like Mongolia makes you pretty Catholic in your tastes!
                        Pro's: I find the act of exercise almost spiritual: It's not about how I look (I'm no muscle-head and the closest I ever get to modelling is Airfix) or about awards and medals. It's about being alone - literally, no-one can help you - with your own resources and efforts, against not so much other competitors, as against the conditions: the terrain, the weather, Nature herself: She doesn't care if you finish your run or drop two hundred feet down a frozen crag. If you 'bonk' and run out of energy halfway up a fell, it's down to you: if you're up the Dufourspitze and your water freezes, your hands are too cold to work and you're still six miles from the Hut: you've got to go on; if you're on the Rower and the wall kicks in at 5,000m and you've got another 10k to do....it's your call. I don't want to sound like a bloody Reebok ad, cos I hate all that 'motivational' shite, but just to push yourself every day is an affirmation of Life. And it's when I get my best creative visions too!
                        Con's: It can get in the way of other stuff! Like work, life, people, writing...I finally got the balance right, but only after it nearly drove me mad trying to 'do it all'!
                        Moral: Do it - if you like it - but take care. It can be addictive. And if it ain't your bag - stuff it!!! Only do it if it turns you on...it probably will/ does!
                        Sorry to bore you all. It's one of my 'mainsprings' you see... :D

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          After that, Perdix, I feel like I'd like to lie down for a bit. I've just come back from a tough walk round the block. Of course, I used to do more, but I got my kicks from getting to the top of a mountain by the easiest route (unlike Harrison, who is a very good technical rock climber and a great teacher -- he taught Linda to climb) or by the difficult route if the maps or map-reader aren't good. What little technical climbing I've done has been to get from one bit of a walk-up to another. I love walking and the reason I wound up with a house in Yorkshire originally was because of my enjoyment of walking (sometimes running) uphill.
                          I would rather walk from one place to another, especially in a city or in
                          underpopulated country, because I enjoy the solitude or anonymity.
                          I believe I started to get ill about ten years ago because that was largely denied to me in Texas (don't listen to that 'don't fence me in' rubbish -- it's the most fenced in place I've ever lived) -- as well as Texas being the most polluted state in the union (and I don't mean just by politicians and '
                          'grandfathered' industry). One of the reasons I'm making plans to leave, in fact, is because it's unhealthy. I do much better in a big city, where I have a well-developed immune system designed to deal with city toxines.
                          I used to cycle in London, too. Cycled a bit in Oxfordshire. It was easier to walk and run in Yorkshire. Never had any taste for caving, but I love
                          getting to a peak taller than all other peaks in a range and standing above the clouds with the other peaks like islands. But Harrison was a serious climber and the book you mention (Climbers) actually won an award given by the climbing fraternity. These days, with a dodgy foot and arteries, it's much harder to enjoy getting out, but I still miss it and
                          plan to get back into some sort of trim when we're back in Europe.
                          I can still manage a substantial number of blocks in NY, however, and have actually had the experience Ray Bradbury writes about when in LA, where cops treat you with suspicion because you're a pedestrian. They start off by asking you if your car's broken down...

                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yoga.
                            Walking.
                            Garlic and good olive oil.
                            Honey rather than sugar.
                            Not letting the mind go soggy, or the emotions calcify, or the libido dessicate.
                            If meat (which I love): wild seasonal game, properly-hung organic beef, seasonal lamb, etc. With beef, taste before you buy (as you would cheese, ask the butcher for a thin little shaving.)
                            Fish should be wild-caught or at the mimimum organically-farmed. The environmental damage the mass-production salmon industry is doing is unspeakable, and the fish themselves are treated wretchedly.
                            Good aromatic herbs.
                            Not too much caffeine but don't be afraid of stimulus.
                            The same applies to red wine, fine malt whiskies, and any of one's personal pleasures.
                            Seasonal vegetables.
                            Don't be greedy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                              What little technical climbing I've done has been to get from one bit of a walk-up to another.
                              I just came across an old interview where you relate your experience in Lapland (presumably when you were quite young), 'climbing without any sort of equipment and hanging by my fingernails over glaciers while the mist came in all around me.' 8O

                              It's a good interview actually, that appeared in Science Fiction Review in the late 70s, and has a great deal of interesting biographical stuff.
                              'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                              Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

                              Comment

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