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The Olympics Thread

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  • #16
    I'm not big on pro sports, but a friend of mine who is made this point I thought was interesting.

    He said the reason our US basketball 'dream team' is getting its ass kicked is that it's a bunch of guys who are used to being the go-to guy. Plus, they don't play on the same team enough to have a good chemistry.

    The other teams at the games, such as Puerto Rico, play together constantly and simply work better as a team.
    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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    • #17
      Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
      He said the reason our US basketball 'dream team' is getting its ass kicked is that it's a bunch of guys who are used to being the go-to guy. Plus, they don't play on the same team enough to have a good chemistry.
      Makes sense!

      Too many egos spoil the team!
      Madness is always the best armor against Reality

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
        Meanwhile "we" appear to be winning more medals, which is good for me from the point of view that the more events we win, the less chance there is of a single event being hailed as the new Rugby (the sport that the papers all went crazy for when "we" actually won something, but the hype has since wound down).
        Something similar happened in Sweden during the last Winter Olympics, when everybody suddenly had to pretend that they were interested in curling. National pride sometimes does ugly things to people...
        You can't spell "politically correct" without "correct".

        Comment


        • #19
          Personally I think that Iran should be banned from the games for that policy... It is clearly against the spirit of the games. We're supposed to be putting politics behind us. I heard an interview with a palistinian who disagreed with this behavior, she said that the games were in the sprit of peace and she would gladly compete against Isrealie opponents...
          Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
          Speaking of Olympic martial arts, was anybody surprised by the unsportsmanlike refusal by the Iranian judo champion to compete against a Jew? Does anyone but me wonder why Iran's "policy" to "refrain from competing against athletes of the Zionist regime" didn't automatically exclude them from being allowed to compete at all? I mean, this kind of attitude flies in the face of everything the Olympics stand for, right?

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          • #20
            I don't think banning people from the Olympics is a good idea at all. While we can shake our heads about some participants' strange - or bad behaviour, I think behind the scenes, in the Olympic village during breaks etc, these people at least get a chance for a closer look at eachother. They get to see that those depicted as "enemies", "monsters" or "villans" are just young sportsmen and sportswomen like themselves - and humans. And that's something the various regimes aren't very happy about, but can hardly prevent.
            Google ergo sum

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Kitsune
              Personally I think that Iran should be banned from the games for that policy... It is clearly against the spirit of the games. We're supposed to be putting politics behind us. I heard an interview with a palistinian who disagreed with this behavior, she said that the games were in the sprit of peace and she would gladly compete against Isrealie opponents...
              Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
              Speaking of Olympic martial arts, was anybody surprised by the unsportsmanlike refusal by the Iranian judo champion to compete against a Jew? Does anyone but me wonder why Iran's "policy" to "refrain from competing against athletes of the Zionist regime" didn't automatically exclude them from being allowed to compete at all? I mean, this kind of attitude flies in the face of everything the Olympics stand for, right?
              Glad you agree with me, Kitsune. By the way, that was my ramble you quoted, not Dee's...

              Originally posted by LEtranger
              I don't think banning people from the Olympics is a good idea at all. While we can shake our heads about some participants' strange - or bad behaviour, I think behind the scenes, in the Olympic village during breaks etc, these people at least get a chance for a closer look at eachother. They get to see that those depicted as "enemies", "monsters" or "villans" are just young sportsmen and sportswomen like themselves - and humans. And that's something the various regimes aren't very happy about, but can hardly prevent.
              But don't you think holding a policy like that goes against everything the Olympics stand for? Doesn't it make a mockery of the whole affair?
              "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
              --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

              Comment


              • #22
                Sorry PW... I was trying to shorten the quote to just the points I was responding too... I think it's sad when people try politicise the Olympics, when basically Olympics are supposed to help us get beyond politics...

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                  shortened


                  Originally posted by LEtranger
                  I don't think banning people from the Olympics is a good idea at all. While we can shake our heads about some participants' strange - or bad behaviour, I think behind the scenes, in the Olympic village during breaks etc, these people at least get a chance for a closer look at eachother. They get to see that those depicted as "enemies", "monsters" or "villains" are just young sportsmen and sportswomen like themselves - and humans. And that's something the various regimes aren't very happy about, but can hardly prevent.
                  But don't you think holding a policy like that goes against everything the Olympics stand for? Doesn't it make a mockery of the whole affair?
                  Maybe this is a misunderstanding. I'm just saying that the Olympics "on and off stage" are an opportunity for the participants to experience that the supposed enemies are just normal people. A lot of this went on during the many Olympic Games while the "Cold War" was going on and many a friendshiporiginated this way that disregarded the official political stance of the regimes involved. Not always, but if you ban people you disallow this taking place.
                  Countries holding certain politcs that we find appalling are numerous in any case, but were do we start? I don't think it is prudent to completely isolate a country like Iran. It would "prove" to the fundamentalists' faction there that the entire "Western" world is conspiring against them and they would become even more powerful ... which finally could serve as "evidence" to certain others that there is an "Axis of Evil" that one has to wage a war against, and so on ...
                  Google ergo sum

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I like L'E's opinion on this one.
                    I think he actually is saying that
                    the Olympics are not about politics
                    but good-will-- something humanitarian, which
                    in turn, surmounts politics and
                    the demonization of other nations
                    that creates enmity.
                    \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                    Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jerico
                      I like L'E's opinion on this one.
                      I think he actually is saying that
                      the Olympics are not about politics
                      but good-will-- something humanitarian, which
                      in turn, surmounts politics and
                      the demonization of other nations
                      that creates enmity.
                      Thank you, Jerico :D :D
                      The Olympics are a chance, nothing more, nothing less ...
                      Google ergo sum

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        De nada, amigo.

                        I was watching the gold tennis match the other day.

                        I was rooting for Fish, the American,
                        but he ended up losing to the Chilean.
                        And I was ok with it.

                        It's possible that Fish got a bad break on the
                        non-call when recieving that serve during a crucial
                        point. He was losing 4-3 in the last set, and went
                        down 5-3 after losing the game with the apparant bad
                        non-call, if I recall correctly.

                        Well, bad non-call or not, you have to overcome it
                        and finish the match. Fish didn't. Being mentally
                        strong is just as crucial, if not more, as physical
                        conditioning in sports, so I applaud the Chilean's
                        performance. He deserved the gold.

                        I agree with the basketball comments.
                        USA needs to re-think their strategies as
                        the world has improved in basketball.
                        \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                        Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by LEtranger
                          Countries holding certain politcs that we find appalling are numerous in any case, but were do we start? I don't think it is prudent to completely isolate a country like Iran. It would "prove" to the fundamentalists' faction there that the entire "Western" world is conspiring against them and they would become even more powerful ... which finally could serve as "evidence" to certain others that there is an "Axis of Evil" that one has to wage a war against, and so on ...
                          I agree with you, LEtranger, and if the Iranian judo champion had said, "My country has a policy that I must not compete against a Zionist, but I see from these games that he is just another human like me and I choose to ignore the policy my country has set up. I will compete against the Israeli," that would have been so cool.

                          BUT, his country has a pre-determined policy that trumps good sportsmanship. Going in, Iran had no intention of competing against anyone from Israel. That's what I think should keep countries out: political policies that contradict the spirit of the games. Get rid of the unsportsmanlike policy and we'll treat you like an athlete instead of a political activist.
                          "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                          --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I like your opinion too, PWV.

                            Just call me Ass Kisser Master. :D

                            I don't know everything that's going on
                            in the Olympics, but if it's Iran's policy
                            as a whole to refuse to compete with
                            certain individuals, then perhaps ban the entire country
                            of Iran.
                            But if it's a few individuals with that have a political
                            activist attitude, then just ban the individuals perhaps?
                            \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                            Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                              I agree with you, LEtranger, and if the Iranian judo champion had said, "My country has a policy that I must not compete against a Zionist, but I see from these games that he is just another human like me and I choose to ignore the policy my country has set up. I will compete against the Israeli," that would have been so cool.

                              BUT, his country has a pre-determined policy that trumps good sportsmanship. Going in, Iran had no intention of competing against anyone from Israel. That's what I think should keep countries out: political policies that contradict the spirit of the games. Get rid of the unsportsmanlike policy and we'll treat you like an athlete instead of a political activist.
                              I would like agree with you PWV, if we were dealing with a rationale similar to ours. The individual member of a country's team can't, however, just say THAT; he/she can't publicly say anything like that if he/he doesn't want to defect the same minute. I wouldn't be surprised if the person were pretty ashamed, secretly, as a sportsperson.
                              And letting people from such a country take part is even more a must then, because the message will also be taken back home and discussed behind closed doors in families and among friends that the international community and its "offer of peace" are undeterred and keep going strong even if slapped in the face by such a comportment. Our moral is stronger, or at least the Olympic ideal can cope with it. And THAT'S a strong message.

                              I remember a Whisky ad in London many years ago: "Teachers can take a little squirt ...!"

                              Bit tired, sorry if my reply comes along a little cumbersome ... I always have to more or less check every word and sentence doubly as I'm not a native speaker.

                              By the by, does anybody remember if there were any consequences for those US athletes who gave the "Black Panther"-salute when they got their gold medals in, I think, Mexico 1968??? Probably no legal repercussions, yet loss of contracts and things?
                              Google ergo sum

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                You're turning me around on this, LEtranger. I completely see what you're saying now. The Iranian judo champ gets to go home and explain to his family and friends that he could have easily trounced the Israeli and possibly even brought home Gold, but failed to do so thanks to Iran's unsportsmanlike policy (the fact that Miresmaeili was officially eliminated after failing to make weight notwithstanding).

                                Originally posted by LEtranger
                                Bit tired, sorry if my reply comes along a little cumbersome ... I always have to more or less check every word and sentence doubly as I'm not a native speaker.
                                You have better English than a lot of native English-speakers I know. 8O No lie.
                                "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                                --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                                Comment

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