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God is not Pro-life

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  • Livebrain
    Livebrain
    Denizen of Moo Uria
    Livebrain
    Denizen of Moo Uria
    • Jan 2007
    • 147

    #16
    In my opinion, we get in trouble when we presume to speak for others, God included.

    Also, would like to point out that not every Christian believes that theirs is the only path to salvation; in a common mistake, the Prof. seems to confuse a specific version of Christianity with the whole. For the record, almost 85% of Americans are Christian (i.e. believe in the divinity of a figure commonly known as Jesus Christ), but only about 10 or 15% are of the specific faith (commonly referred to as "Born Again Christians") that actively pursue the notion of a unique pathway to heaven.

    Responding to Des's contribution, I think that this is one of those cases where experience is an incredible force... I know my opinions on the notion of choice/life are, more than any other opinion I hold, tied to my experience as opposed to objective analysis. I was ardently pro-choice (though, interestingly, I am usually one of the most conservative participants to this forum) until I lived through an experience like the one, presumably, to which Des refers. Now, not so sure.

    Over eight years later, I still on occasion wonder what would have happened had the 10-week embryo that I fathered not naturally terminated. I don't speak for my wife on this subject (though we've spoken of it, of course), but after that experience, "choice" is a misnomer, for there really isn't any "choice" in the true sense of the word, at least in those cases where the initial choice, to risk conception, was made with full consent.

    Politically, I wouldn't deny anyone their experience, and therefore would say I am "pro-choice", but I would wish that many on the pro-choice side of things have a little compassion and respect for why someone might view this as something more than an abstract medical procedure or a vendetta against women (my opinion only, but that is a preposterous notion to me).

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    • UncleDes
      UncleDes
      Got Moves like Jagged
      UncleDes
      Got Moves like Jagged
      • Dec 2006
      • 3682

      #17
      Originally posted by Livebrain View Post
      Politically, I wouldn't deny anyone their experience, and therefore would say I am "pro-choice", but I would wish that many on the pro-choice side of things have a little compassion and respect for why someone might view this as something more than an abstract medical procedure or a vendetta against women (my opinion only, but that is a preposterous notion to me).
      This sounds like we are of a similar mind on this issue. I haven't met any women who have had abortions for whom it was a decision they made lightly, however. The belief that any woman (barring psychosis) can just walk away from the abortion clinic whistling happily seems to be a purely male one.

      Des
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      • Livebrain
        Livebrain
        Denizen of Moo Uria
        Livebrain
        Denizen of Moo Uria
        • Jan 2007
        • 147

        #18
        Originally posted by UncleDes View Post
        Originally posted by Livebrain View Post
        Politically, I wouldn't deny anyone their experience, and therefore would say I am "pro-choice", but I would wish that many on the pro-choice side of things have a little compassion and respect for why someone might view this as something more than an abstract medical procedure or a vendetta against women (my opinion only, but that is a preposterous notion to me).
        This sounds like we are of a similar mind on this issue. I haven't met any women who have had abortions for whom it was a decision they made lightly, however. The belief that any woman (barring psychosis) can just walk away from the abortion clinic whistling happily seems to be a purely male one.

        Des

        I hear you; I wasn't necessarily implying the latter point. This is hard to put into words because of its personal nature, but even before I never thought people would take it lightly, but in hindsight, I guess I would say that it seems to be one of those decisions that no matter how much diligence and forethought and introspection that goes into the decision, one can't really know until it's too late what the ramifications are (and even that isn't what I really mean).

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        • Nathaniel
          Nathaniel
          Champion of the Balance
          Nathaniel
          Champion of the Balance
          • Nov 2006
          • 1989

          #19
          Originally posted by Prof. Faustaff View Post
          Indeed. If you Google Was Jesus a Buddhist? you get a ton of results from various sites suggesting a causal link between Christ's teaching and Buddhism.

          My skepticism with the notion that Jesus took the teachings of Buddha and modified them to His own ends revolves mostly around the fact that it would seem to negate Christ's claim to divinity - i.e. of being the Word of God (as John describes Jesus) - and reduce Him to the mere status of merely being a 'wise or holy man', which lots of people seem prepared to do without being able to accept his claim to be God. But my skepticism is also informed by the fact that since there are similarities between Jesus's teachings and Plato's writings one might as well ask 'Was Jesus a Platonist?' for all the illumination it provides.

          Again, this all comes down (I think) to causality; just because Source B contains the same (or similar) ideas as Source A it doesn't necessarily follow that Source B was influenced by Source A. It doesn't mean it wasn't, of course, but without (reasonable) evidence of some kind of 'linkage' between the two it's dangerous to make assumptions.

          As has been said elsewhere:
          Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
          ...if all Truth derives from God then other texts may contain truthful elements though He hasn't spoken through them.
          It goes without saying that Christians, of course, have an exclusive belief that only their faith provides a guaranteed path to Salvation. Which again some people find unaceptable.

          Interesting discussion though.
          Similarity between A and B can be because both share a cause... although in this case "influence" is probably a preerable term. There was a lot of idea migration between east and west in the ancient period, zoroastranism and taoism could (maybe) be other examples... but although specific cases of saying X caused Y are probably drawing a long bow, saying that both may have drawn from a shared well of ideas is probably more reasonable

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