Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

News That Sucks

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • News That Sucks

    Watchdog group report
    BY PETER GOODMAN, May 25, 2004

    http://www.newsday.com/entertainment...14,print.story

    Despite a perception that National Public Radio is politically liberal, the majority of its sources are actually Republicans and conservatives, according to a survey released today by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, a left-leaning media watchdog.

    "Republicans not only had a substantial partisan edge," according to a report accompanying the survey, "individual Republicans were NPR's most popular sources overall, taking the top seven spots in frequency of appearance." In addition, representatives of right-of-center think tanks outnumbered their leftist counterparts by more than four to one, FAIR reported.

    Citing comments dating to the Nixon administration in the 1970s, the report said, "That NPR harbors a liberal bias is an article of faith among many conservatives." However, it added, "Despite the commonness of such claims, little evidence has ever been presented for a left bias at NPR."

    The study counted 2,334 sources used in 804 stories aired last June for four programs: "All Things Considered," "Morning Edition," "Weekend Edition Saturday" and "Weekend Edition Sunday." For the analysis of think tanks, FAIR used the months of May through August 2003.

    Overall, Republicans outnumbered Democrats by 61 percent to 38 percent, a figure only slightly higher now, when the GOP controls the White House and both houses of Congress, than during a previous survey in 1993, during the Clinton administration.

    "Some people may think is too left of center because they are contrasting it to the louder, black-and-white sloganeering of talk radio," said FAIR's Steve Rendall, a co-author of the report. "It could be that, just by contrast, the more dulcet [tone] and slower pace and lower volume of NPR makes many people think it must be the opposite of talk radio."

    -----------------------------------

    Kissinger tape: Nixon too drunk to speak with British PM
    Wednesday, May 26, 2004 Posted: 1:39 PM EDT (1739 GMT)

    http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/....ap/index.html

    COLLEGE PARK, Maryland (AP) -- Five days into the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, with the superpowers on the brink of confrontation, President Nixon was too drunk to discuss the crisis with the British prime minister, according to newly released transcripts of tape recordings.

    {edit: My interest here is based on my fear that Junior is a "dry drunk" that sometimes binges, hence the accident of last weekend...not exactly presidential material in my view}

    -----------------------------------

    'Pirate Act' raises civil rights concerns
    Last modified: May 26, 2004, 4:00 AM PDT
    By Declan McCullagh, Staff Writer, CNET News.com

    http://news.com.com/'Pirate+Act'+raises+civil+rights+concerns/2100-1027_3-5220480.html?tag=nefd.lede

    File swappers concerned about getting in trouble with record labels over illegal downloads may soon have a major new worry: the U.S. Department of Justice.

    A proposal that the Senate may vote on as early as next week would let federal prosecutors file civil lawsuits against suspected copyright infringers, with fines reaching tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    The so-called Pirate Act is raising alarms among copyright lawyers and lobbyists for peer-to-peer firms, who have been eyeing the recording industry's lawsuits against thousands of peer-to-peer users with trepidation. The Justice Department, they say, could be far more ambitious.

    ...

    "It represents yet another point in another very long line of major corporate copyright interests pushing for and receiving what amounts to significant corporate welfare," said Adam Eisgrau, a lobbyist for the P2P United trade association. "This legislation literally offloads the cost of enforcing copyrights traditionally borne by the copyright holder onto the federal government and therefore the taxpayers."

    ...

    Critics also charge that the Pirate Act may invent a form of double jeopardy: It would let the RIAA sue the same people already sued by the Justice Department.

    {edit: My take on this is that it is the upteenth step towards the complete conflation of the government with several large corporate interests. And who's to say that they will not both sue civilly and then pursue one criminally? Personally, I think they want everyone either poor or in prison, either way working for the man - doesn't matter whether it's Walmart or Unicor (the Federal Prison slave labor system that steals union work).}

  • #2
    Maybe they think it's biased because they keep having to go on there and answer awkward questions??

    Comment


    • #3
      Report: 1 of Every 75 U.S. Men in Prison
      by Connie Cass
      Published on Friday, May 28, 2004 by the Associated Press

      http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0528-02.htm

      WASHINGTON - America's inmate population grew by 2.9 percent last year, to almost 2.1 million people, with one of every 75 men living in prison or jail.

      The inmate population continued its rise despite a fall in the crime rate and many states' efforts to reduce some sentences, especially for low-level drug offenders.

      The report issued Thursday by the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics attributes much of the increase to get-tough policies enacted during the 1980s and '90s, such as mandatory drug sentences, "three-strikes-and-you're-out" laws for repeat offenders, and "truth-in-sentencing" laws that restrict early releases.

      ...

      The nation's incarceration rate tops the world, according to The Sentencing Project, another group that promotes alternatives to prison. That compares with a rate of 169 per 100,000 residents in Mexico, 116 in Canada and 143 for England and Wales.

      -----------------------------------------

      Worse than Russia. How proud are we now? "Land of the free" my ass...

      But don't worry, you can still make bricks without straw for pharaoh by working for: http://www.unicor.gov/

      Comment


      • #4
        Public Broadcasting Veers to the Right
        Chellie Pingree, AlterNet
        June 1, 2004

        http://www.alternet.org/print.html?StoryID=18831

        Ken Auletta's expose in this week's New Yorker "Big Bird Flies Right" points to several disturbing trends:

        The decision by CPB to fund two programs -- one hosted by Tucker Carlson, who speaks for conservatives on CNN's "Crossfire," and one moderated by Paul Gigot, editorial page editor of The Wall Street Journal, at the same time that "NOW with Bill Moyers," which receives no CPB funds, is cut from an hour to 30 minutes, in what appears to be a Bush Administration litmus test for choosing members of the CPB. When CPB board candidate Chon Noriega, a UCLA media professor and co-founder of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers, was interviewed by the White House, he was asked whether the CPB should intervene in programming "deemed politically biased." When Professor Noriega said intervention should be used in only extraordinary circumstances, the appointment process ground to a halt, and the White House asked Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD) to put forward another candidate.

        Bill Moyer's statement to Auletta: "This is the first time in my 32 years of public broadcasting that CPB has ordered up programs for ideological instead of journalistic reasons."

        Comment


        • #5
          "Worse than Russia. How proud are we now? "Land of the free" my ass... "

          So prison is worse than being killed outright for your crimes? I haven't been in a prison in several years, but last time I was there, inmates were getting three free meals, a warm bed, cable TV, access to an education, recreational equipment. You don't see the sunlight that much, but...


          Edit: I'm not trying to wind you up, just being a little contrarian. I get your point, I think, and while I don't agree with all the proposed solutions to this problem, there is a lot of work to be done here.

          Comment


          • #6
            Gee Bill, don't you think the rate of incarceration says a little something to the effect of "law enforcement growth industry" or the like? Why must all these people be in prison? Are americans somehow more truly criminally-minded than are Canadians or Europeans?

            I note that you are prepared to pounce on people for their supposed crimes (and when it comes to common law crimes of a weighty nature I have no argument: rape, murder, theft). But does that law enforcement reflex extend to crimes that express freedom on the other side of the coin? I refer to "crimes" like drug use/sale, prostitution, gambling, etc. [Drug involved criminals alone are an enormous percentage of the current prison population.] Personally, I don't care that much about those issues as I don't use drugs (not for years), never hired a person for sex, never gamble, or [fill in the blank] - but I don't mind if others want to enagage in any of those activities themselves. I am allergic to marijuana, but I bet more than 75% of the people that use this site have regularly used at some point in their life.

            I'm supposed to care about that fact? I'm supposed to support the imprisonment of people growing pot? What about people like Tommy Chong who have been imprisoned on the flimsiest of pretexts? Chong is currently doing time for selling glass art/pipes! WTF is that about?

            BTW, I am not that impressed with the idea that inmates "have it too good." Prisons are overpopulated. Prisoners are subject to an utter lack of privacy. Prisoners are in a cage. The reality is you wouldn't treat your own dog the way we treat human beings in prison. How happy would you be to be confined to your home? It might be comfortable, but it would still totally suck. Don't forget to take out preexisting sexual relationship out of the equation too. If you want sex, one of your same sex fellow inmates will have to do.

            I don't believe in treating even murders inhumanely. As a society, we are better than that and should not desire revenge.

            Comment


            • #7
              "I note that you are prepared to pounce on people for their supposed crimes...<SNIP TO> but I don't mind if others want to enagage in any of those activities themselves."

              I don't disagree at all. I like your distinction in fact. BUT, I am of the opinion that if there is a law that is not serving the interests of the people (read: society) it should be changed. Until that happens, then we all live by the same set of choices in this regard. I don't do those things you list either, but let's assume I did smoke grass. Until the law is changed it is a choice of mine: do I want to smoke? Am I willing to accept the consequences of doing so? Yes, no? What else can I do about it?

              "I'm supposed to support the imprisonment of people growing pot? What about people like Tommy Chong who have been imprisoned on the flimsiest of pretexts? Chong is currently doing time for selling glass art/pipes! WTF is that about?"

              I don't disagree with that at all. But for your high profile, egregious example, what about the kid selling meth at the middle school down the block? I'm old enough to make the decisions for myself, but my eight year old isn't. Are there better uses of our jail space than pot growers? Of course. But I look at it like this: they are conscientious objectors. Key word: conscientious. I have long been an advocate for the legalization of drugs (under certain circumstances and parameters).

              "BTW, I am not that impressed with the idea that inmates "have it too good." Prisons are overpopulated. Prisoners are subject to an utter lack of privacy. Prisoners are in a cage. The reality is you wouldn't treat your own dog the way we treat human beings in prison."

              So how would you handle this? Whether you agree or not, a good portion of the idea of imprisonment is "punishment". Is it pretty or something to be proud of? I think not. But what's the alternative short of lawlessness? Turn Montana into a prison in and of itself and allow those convicted of a crime to live there? I realize my position has a slippery slope, but i am prepared to say that there is a degree to which the prison experience SHOULDN'T be like being maintained in my own home. Not in all cases, and I allow for the fact of false imprisonment, but there is an element of choice in many instances of incarceration.

              "How happy would you be to be confined to your home? It might be comfortable, but it would still totally suck. Don't forget to take out preexisting sexual relationship out of the equation too. If you want sex, one of your same sex fellow inmates will have to do."

              To be crass, if I want out of my house or if I want sex with a partner of my choice on my terms badly enough, then I don't sell crack or hold up the liquor store or pull that knife when the guy gets in my face over the Yankee game. Now, don't jump on me for that, please. I'm making a point. I don't disagree with you entirely, but there is another side to this.

              "I don't believe in treating even murders inhumanely. As a society, we are better than that and should not desire revenge."

              Nothing like trying to change 10,000 years of human nature proven over and over and over and over again. :D Idealistically I agree with you, but from a practical standpoint, there is an element of revenge/punishment in our prison system that serves a societal need. How long until there is a real life Batman (that is, a vigilante, street-jusitce figure meting out the revenge and punishment that the system refuses to provide) if your "non-revenge" approiach is taken. Whether it is actual revenge (which I see in the death penalty, which I am against) or perceived revenge (the denial by incarceration of the normal privileges afforded to and by society), I think this is integral to the system as it provides a measure of comfort to the victims (and their families) that something was done.

              Comment

              Working...
              X