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Call for an End of Executions

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  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Depressingly predictable.

    I was going to write loads of stuff I realised was largely irrelevant.

    Depressingly predictable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Welcome to the land of states' rights, L'E! Clearly, Georgia's Board of Pardons, and its members political motives, is more important than international outrage, national opinion, and, most importantly, the value of one human life. I'm disgusted and sad.

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    For me Georgia has moved very close to becoming a Rogue State. Where's NATO now?

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    One of the things that most disturbs me about the case in Georgia is the standard set in the appeal-- he was expected to prove his innocence, not that he was not guilty, which is the usual burden of proof. When that is the standard for a death penalty case?

    Rothgo, I think you've hit on one of the problems with this as a political issue (rather than a moral one). Arguing against the death penalty for a child rapist is asking for political trouble. "He supports_____!" I can see the headlines.

    I suppose, though, that would reveal some of the differences between real conviction, which I certainly don't expect in contemporary American politics, and political pragmatism or even self-preserving cynicism, which I do.

    The worst are those who are now trying to advance political careers on the backs of the executed. With all of the posturing about justice for victims, such people are actually victimizing doubly. f-ing hypocrites, indeed, Wanderlust.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rothgo
    replied
    Like most folks in these parts, I'm against killing folks you don't need to.

    That said, I can appreciate the POV to kill somebody who rapes a 4 year old: as much as I disagree with execution, I wouldn't be too enthusiastic about opposing it in such a case. There are no black and whites after all.

    But in any case where there is significant doubt, the death penalty simply can't be an option. Claiming courts never make mistakes, that a guilty verdict means there is no doubt is no better than "I was just following orders". We all have to make our own choices when it comes to the significant choices we're asked to make in our lives, and taking somebody else's certainly has to count in that set.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wanderlust
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc View Post
    Thanks for resurrecting the thread! I think this is going to be a really important issue in the next US presidential election, starting with the Republican primaries. Perry is proud of killing so many people, even when confronted with evidence of people being put to death for crimes that later evidence showed other people committed.
    How terribly christian of Perry. ing hypocrites.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucid Sirius
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc View Post
    As an acquaintance of mine put it many years ago, "What's wrong with these people? Why're they all so "old testament" about this stuff? Haven't they heard of compassion? Of change? Of growing beyond the need to see blood spilled?"

    I'd like to think the US will return, hopefully soon, to outlawing capital punishment. But right now there is a significant group of people that seems to think this bloodsport should continue.

    Totally awful when death becomes loud, eerily lusty politics instead of the most solemn thing a state can be involved in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucid Sirius
    replied
    And The Guardian lists ten compelling reasons why this particular execution should not proceed:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011...vis-10-reasons

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    From L. Pitts.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/site/n...0,850806.story

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Lucid Sirius View Post
    I don't think the state has any business putting people to death. That being said, if they're going to do it then it must be as faultless a system as is possible to prevent "mistakes." In the US, our system is so faulty it is frightening.

    And yes, Doc, the elections should provide for much interest on this issue, especially as it will be taking Perry's Texas concept to the national level. That concept being that the best governor is always the one that executes the most criminals. When Anne Richards ran against Clayton Williams, they both got to bragging often about how many they'd send to the electric chair that the press began to call the whole election "The Great Texas Fry-off."

    And what is happening in Georgia should terrify all of us. Mistakes happen.

    One of the many reasons that Perry scares me is that he seems to take his responsibilities with the death penalty pretty lightly. He's managed to separate himself from the "death" part, and has managed to build a persona on the "penalty" part. Like others, of course. It is odd think about the great Anne Richards as part of that discussion, too. Violence from the state is no better than violence from the public.

    And now I'm off my soapbox...

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucid Sirius
    replied
    I don't think the state has any business putting people to death. That being said, if they're going to do it then it must be as faultless a system as is possible to prevent "mistakes." In the US, our system is so faulty it is frightening.

    And yes, Doc, the elections should provide for much interest on this issue, especially as it will be taking Perry's Texas concept to the national level. That concept being that the best governor is always the one that executes the most criminals. When Anne Richards ran against Clayton Williams, they both got to bragging often about how many they'd send to the electric chair that the press began to call the whole election "The Great Texas Fry-off."

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Thanks for resurrecting the thread! I think this is going to be a really important issue in the next US presidential election, starting with the Republican primaries. Perry is proud of killing so many people, even when confronted with evidence of people being put to death for crimes that later evidence showed other people committed.

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    Another guy about to leave Death Row on Wednesday the sad way: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-14991755
    State of Georgia seems to give a f*** for the appeals even of important people to stop the execution in face of grave doubts.
    Sick. Sickening.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nathaniel
    replied
    I've said before and repeat. I believe the death penalty should only be on the table for Ministers of parliament shown to be grossly negligent/corupt, Judges shown to be corupt, and maaaaaybe high ranking police who are shown to be corupt.

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    At least 94 people have been executed in Iran in 2009

    My sad body count, this thread. But I feel I have to shout out my anger somewhere.
    Last week they hanged a young woman, now 9 prisoners in Iran.

    Leave a comment:

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