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Russian North Pole Mission

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  • Russian North Pole Mission

    I have been following this story on the BBC.

    Looks like they had a bit of trouble starting out.

    What I was wondering yesterday,though,is the North Pole going to be one more thing for nation's to fight over?

    It would be great if they just explored the ocean floor to see what lifeforms they could find.

    If they start pumping oil from there,how safe will it be for the environment?

    Russian North Pole mission stalls
    A Russian naval expedition on its way to explore the ocean floor below the North Pole has come to a sudden halt.

    The Akademik Fyodorov research ship suffered engine failure a day after setting off from Murmansk port and is reportedly drifting in the Barents Sea.

    A nuclear powered ice-breaker leading the expedition has turned back to help.

    Russian experts were planning to send a mini-submarine to a depth of 4,200m (14,000 ft) to find evidence to support claims to the resource-rich territory.

    The ice-breaker is expected to reach the stricken ship on Thursday. An assistance team has also been despatched from Murmansk, Russian state media reported.

    The mini-submarine was expected to be launched on Sunday - it is not clear how long it will take to fix the problem.

    Geological proof

    Melting ice in the Arctic has raised hopes of accessing energy reserves.

    Russia's claim to a vast swathe of territory in the Arctic, thought to contain oil, gas and mineral reserves, has been challenged by other powers, including the US.

    Moscow argued before a UN commission in 2001 that waters off its northern coast were in fact an extension of its maritime territory.

    The claim was based on the argument that an underwater feature, known as the Lomonosov Ridge, was an extension of its continental territory. The UN has yet to rule upon the claim.

    The team aboard the mini-submarine Mir was expected to carry out scientific experiments and measurements on the sea bed.

    The Law of the Sea Convention allows states an economic zone of 200 nautical miles, which can sometimes be expanded.

    To extend the zone, a state has to prove that the structure of the continental shelf is similar to the geological structure within its territory.

    At the moment, nobody's shelf extends up to the North Pole, so there is an international area around the Pole administered by the International Seabed Authority.
    Story from BBC NEWS:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...pe/6916662.stm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6916662.stm

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

  • #2
    Originally posted by lemec View Post
    It would be great if they just explored the ocean floor to see what lifeforms they could find.
    Joe - did you ever see the Fast Show? (old BBC Sketch comedy show).

    "...So we ended up finding the lost city of R'Lyeh. Which was nice".
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by devilchicken View Post
      Joe - did you ever see the Fast Show? (old BBC Sketch comedy show).

      "...So we ended up finding the lost city of R'Lyeh. Which was nice".
      I never saw that!

      I bet that was great,I miss alot of BBC stuff.

      I will try see if there are any episodes on You Tube,that would be cool.

      Thanks!

      "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
      - Michael Moorcock

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      • #4
        This is the sort of expedition that noone will ever hear from again (in a Lovecraft story).

        Dan Simmons who wrote a SF version of the Iliad and the Odyssey - wrote another book called The Terror about a famous artic expedition in the 1800's where two ships were lost and never heard from again. The theory is that they all went crazy from lead poisoning from faulty canned food, and died of exposure after their ships got trapped by the ice. In his version of course - there are man-eating snow-beasts to contend with.
        Last edited by devilchicken; 07-26-2007, 10:22 AM.
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, you could always just drive to the North Pole.

          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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          • #6
            I sort of remember a 'golden age' sci-fi story, real hugo gernsback rocketships and rayguns type of stuff, about a war for the north pole - but I can't remember much about it. Anyone else remember this?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by devilchicken View Post
              This is the sort of expedition that noone will ever hear from again (in a Lovecraft story).

              Dan Simmons who wrote a SF version of the Iliad and the Odyssey - wrote another book called The Terror about a famous artic expedition in the 1800's where two ships were lost and never heard from again. The theory is that they all went crazy from lead poisoning from faulty canned food, and died of exposure after their ships got trapped by the ice. In his version of course - there are man-eating snow-beasts to contend with.
              Did the man-eating snow-beasts get lead poisoning? I remember seeing a documentary about it a few years ago. Apparently they tried to trek out carrying the massive map table taken from one of the ships because in their mad state they believed they need it to navigate with!

              On the subject of submarines, I always really enjoyed Frank Herbert's "Dragon in the Sea" (or "Under Pressure" as it was originally published). May have to dig it out again an see if it stands up to re-reading....
              Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
              Bakunin

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              • #8
                Russian North Pole Mission

                Exploring the Poles was no joke, many brave men perished on those expeditions.

                Despite my differences with Mr. Simmons(I think his politics are barking mad) "The Terror" is one of the best horror novels ever, followed closely by "Drood"

                Since Cthulhu mostly sticks to the South Pacific, Rhan-Tegoth is a likely suspect for hijinks in the Boreal Regions.

                Returning to reality, reports I have seen describe the Polar Sea as mostly open water today, with the Nortwest Passage quite available to shipping, Franklin was right, but at the wrong time, poor fellow.

                Santa Claus will have to look into a version of China Mieville's floating city of Armada for his operations.

                Speaking of, I've discovered steam lift dirigibles on the 'net, called flying tea kettles by some Talk about steam punk!

                I've been away from this site too long!

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                • #9
                  Old thread but find it interesting in light of the article I just read about the Russians drilling down about 2 miles and finding a giant fresh water lake under the ice in Anarctica. Russians still seem to value science while the US regresses in to equating it with witchcraft and voodoo.
                  herb

                  Man spends his time on devising a more idiot proof computer. The universe spends its time devising bigger idiots. So far the universe is winning.

                  http://www.wolfshead.net/wolfshowl


                  http://www.wolfshead.net/books

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                  • #10
                    I wonder what might dwell in Lake Vostok? It's not the only lake of it's kind, just the largest. I'm thinking it's either totally lifeless, or full of things we've never seen, or even dreamed of, maybe some big things, cold temps breed large critters.

                    The environment being anaerobic, or so one might think and utterly dark, I can imagine eyeless horrors. Of course, I can imagine Cthulhu and Godzilla,too, so much for that.

                    I can also imagine a lifeless cavity in the ice, dark and dead,

                    We shall see. Just don't hurt the penguins!

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