Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Television and why I've got rid of it.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • David Mosley
    Eternal Administrator
    • Jul 2004
    • 11823

    #46
    Let us know how you get on.
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

    Comment

    • danskmacabre
      Defender of the Runestaff
      • Sep 2006
      • 377

      #47
      Hehe, will do.

      I'm ok with it as I spend lots of time on my computer anyway.

      My wife has SOME reservations now, as the deadline is approaching and will miss some of teh trashy daytime programmes she watchess lol.

      But it's to late for her to back out now.
      Last edited by danskmacabre; 02-27-2007, 06:11 AM.

      Comment

      • David Mosley
        Eternal Administrator
        • Jul 2004
        • 11823

        #48
        Originally posted by danskmacabre View Post
        But it's to late for her to back out now.
        I guess you haven't read Lysistrata recently then?
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

        Comment

        • danskmacabre
          Defender of the Runestaff
          • Sep 2006
          • 377

          #49
          Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
          I guess you haven't read Lysistrata recently then?
          Hehe, Well I doubt that will happen, we gotta find SOMETHING to do with no TV.. ;)

          Comment

          • danskmacabre
            Defender of the Runestaff
            • Sep 2006
            • 377

            #50
            2 months later.

            And alls well.

            What has changed?

            Well, I mostly notice changes on the weekends, we go out more, such as down the beach park or just out the back.

            I DO spend more time on teh PC as well though, but this might be coincidental, as over the last few months I have been getting heavily into Linux, so lots of messing about with this.

            My wife had to make some adjustments at first, but is cool with it now.

            The kids were ok with it at first over the first month, then my oldest (my 6 year old son) said he missed cbbc and stuff like that.
            Since then we have borrowed DVDs and so on from other people, so they still
            get to veg out in front of the Tv every now and then.
            It Seemed a bity unfair to completely take the Tv away from them.

            during the week, I don't miss the TV at all, we get lots of other stuff done and I can play games on the Pc or do other stuff, it actualy has freed up LOTs of time, more than I realised.

            When Tv programs on demand (such as Joost.com) start working properly, I will probably use that, but we will not return to broadcasted/scheduled TV again.

            Comment

            • WhiteWolf359
              Multiversal Airship Pilot
              • Nov 2003
              • 1056

              #51
              I'd throw my television set in the garbage, but I'd be afraid the garbage would be insulted!
              Lord Warshaw the Unknown

              "Except in dreams, you're never really free." Warren Zevon, Desperados Under the Eaves.

              Comment

              • David Mosley
                Eternal Administrator
                • Jul 2004
                • 11823

                #52
                I saw the best piece of TV drama of the year (to date) last night: the Battlestar Galactica Season 3 finale double-bill. Absolutely astounding stuff, from the acting, the effects and most impressively of all - and something I've come to appreciate all the more as the season progressed - the sound design. Lee Adama's speech in the witness box during Baltar's trial was just simple awesome, a sterling piece of simple, understated but commanding acting from Jamie Bamber. (He's English, donchaknow.)
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment

                • WhiteWolf359
                  Multiversal Airship Pilot
                  • Nov 2003
                  • 1056

                  #53
                  Battlestar Galactica

                  I was really astonished at how good the writing was in the first and second seasons of the new Battlestar Galactica, though I didn't like the whole religious angle, which I think is a bit obvious and shallow (i.e., the Colonists are pantheists while the morally "pure" Cylons worship a single god--Romans v. Christians?). I haven't seen much of the 3rd Season because, in America, anyway, they keep changing times. I watched every week when it was on Friday nights at 9 p.m., but now I think it's Sunday at 11, and I just can't stay up that late when I have to be up at 6:00 a.m. for work on Mondays. I'll just have to rent the DVDs of Season 3 when they come out. That way I can watch at my leisure.
                  Lord Warshaw the Unknown

                  "Except in dreams, you're never really free." Warren Zevon, Desperados Under the Eaves.

                  Comment

                  • danskmacabre
                    Defender of the Runestaff
                    • Sep 2006
                    • 377

                    #54
                    I did see some of season 1 some time back.
                    It did look like a good series, I'll probably buy the boxed sets one day and watch it at my leisure.

                    Comment

                    • devilchicken
                      We'll get to that later
                      • Nov 2004
                      • 2814

                      #55
                      Originally posted by WhiteWolf359 View Post
                      I was really astonished at how good the writing was in the first and second seasons of the new Battlestar Galactica, though I didn't like the whole religious angle, which I think is a bit obvious and shallow (i.e., the Colonists are pantheists while the morally "pure" Cylons worship a single god--Romans v. Christians?). I haven't seen much of the 3rd Season because, in America, anyway, they keep changing times. I watched every week when it was on Friday nights at 9 p.m., but now I think it's Sunday at 11, and I just can't stay up that late when I have to be up at 6:00 a.m. for work on Mondays. I'll just have to rent the DVDs of Season 3 when they come out. That way I can watch at my leisure.
                      I caught season 3. Its a lot more political than the previous seasons with some very obvious nods to Iraq and the War on Terror, especially with the "Occupation" at the start of the season. Pretty good - although the cliffhanger at the end was a little strange and dare I say it "underwhelming". Some interesting new challenges for the writers when the show comes back.
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                      Comment

                      • graham p
                        Sailor on the Seas of Fate
                        • Oct 2006
                        • 56

                        #56
                        I usually watch about 5 hours of tv a week, unless there's something special on, like the World Cup (soccer) or the World Snooker from Sheffield. Generally, I remember there's an OFF button - and use it! However, kudos to danskmacabre for this bold step.

                        The tv licence is becoming increasingly anomolous as the range of channels available goes up and the BBC audience share dwindles. I've heard people ask, why should I pay the licence fee when I only watch xxxxx (insert your list of channels here).

                        However, there are times when the licence fee, somewhat subjectively, justifies itself - like recently, when BBC 4 did that Hawkwind documentary (which included Mike)
                        Last edited by graham p; 05-06-2007, 10:21 AM.
                        Disambiguation... I'm not the 'Graham P' who writes such excellently-constructed reviews on Starfarer's HW site.

                        Comment

                        • danskmacabre
                          Defender of the Runestaff
                          • Sep 2006
                          • 377

                          #57
                          Originally posted by graham p View Post
                          I usually watch about 5 hours of tv a week, unless there's something special on, like the World Cup (soccer) or the World Snooker from Sheffield.
                          I'm not really a fan of sport.


                          Generally, I remember there's an OFF button - and use it! However, kudos to danskmacabre for this bold step.
                          I could do that of course, but I felt the amount of Tv we were watching didn't really justify paying a Tv license, so just decided to get rid of it altogether.

                          The tv licence is becoming increasingly anomolous as the range of channels available goes up and the BBC audience share dwindles. I've heard people ask, why should I pay the licence fee when I only watch xxxxx (insert your list of channels here).
                          That's pretty much my view as well.
                          I used to have sky, which had lots of channlels, didn't watch BBc very often at all (if ever).

                          However, there are times when the licence fee, somewhat subjectively, justifies itself - like recently, when BBC 4 did that Hawkwind documentary (which included Mike)
                          A bit too specific a reason to pay a license fee I'm afraid.


                          Although a bit of an update.

                          The BBC is is currently working on a "BBC on demand program".
                          Meaning those who pay their license can download all the BBC content and watch whenever they want.
                          This makes paying a TV license more attractive to me, as then I'm not bound by watching TV at certain times (when something worth watching comes on).
                          This way, I could sift through all the BBC programs and find what might be good to watch and downlod it straight away and watch it.
                          This could be especially good for my kids, such as educational programs etc.

                          I'll have a look at it (at someone elses place) when it comes out and decide if it's worth paying the license then.

                          Comment

                          • johneffay
                            Born Again Nihilist
                            • Sep 2005
                            • 3394

                            #58
                            Originally posted by danskmacabre View Post
                            This makes paying a TV license more attractive to me, as then I'm not bound by watching TV at certain times (when something worth watching comes on).
                            This way, I could sift through all the BBC programs and find what might be good to watch and downlod it straight away and watch it.
                            But surely you could be doing that anyway, if you wanted to, by means of a video recorder?

                            I watch next to nothing on ITV, but what little I do watch (e.g. new episodes of Midsomer Murders and, ermm can't think of anything else, actually), I always video so that I can strip out the adverts when I do watch it. It takes up a lot less time to watch things like that as well!

                            Comment

                            • danskmacabre
                              Defender of the Runestaff
                              • Sep 2006
                              • 377

                              #59
                              Originally posted by johneffay View Post
                              But surely you could be doing that anyway, if you wanted to, by means of a video recorder?
                              That's true, but I don't necessarily know what I want to watch or when it's playing and I don't want to have to scour through TV guides etc.
                              If I have an option to goto a website and download an entire series or whatever RIGHT now, instead or messing abut with a VCR and setting a record time and so on, (or if I had one, a dvd recorder), then I would by far prefer that.
                              Plus no hassle with rewinding tapes, just use my Media PC to play record and whatever, a lot less hassle and easier to navigate.
                              Anyway, I don't know if I even want to use a pay on demand service really, but I might if it's good enough.
                              TBH, I'm quite enjoying having no TV ATM.




                              I watch next to nothing on ITV, but what little I do watch (e.g. new episodes of Midsomer Murders and, ermm can't think of anything else, actually), I always video so that I can strip out the adverts when I do watch it. It takes up a lot less time to watch things like that as well!
                              Glad it works for you, I just can't be bothered to record onto tapes and stuff like that.
                              I guess if I had Sky Digital with the HDD, it would be a bit easier, but I don't and you still need to record at specific times.

                              I would only be tempted if I could download what I want, when I want.

                              Comment

                              • David Mosley
                                Eternal Administrator
                                • Jul 2004
                                • 11823

                                #60
                                Originally posted by danskmacabre View Post
                                If I have an option to goto a website and download an entire series or whatever RIGHT now, instead or messing abut with a VCR and setting a record time and so on, (or if I had one, a dvd recorder), then I would by far prefer that.
                                Not sure the BBC's on-demand service will do that, but here's the press release:

                                BBC Trust approves BBC's on-demand proposals

                                30 April 2007
                                The BBC Trust has today issued its final approval of the BBC Executive's proposals for new on-demand services, with some modifications. The on-demand proposals are the first to go through a Public Value Test (PVT).
                                The Trust's provisional conclusions were subject to an open consultation. A remarkable 10,500 individuals and organisations responded. In the light of those responses, and after careful consideration of all relevant issues, the Trust has amended two of the conditions of its provisional approval.
                                Diane Coyle, BBC Trustee and Chair of the Trust’s PVT Steering Group, said:
                                "We are delighted so many people responded to the consultation and thank everyone who participated for their contribution. The consultation has demonstrated considerable public support for the on-demand proposals.
                                "Thanks to the thorough assessment through the Public Value Test, and with the modifications which resulted from the test and the consultation, the Trust is satisfied that the BBC's new on-demand services will create significant public value with limited market impact. We have therefore given our final approval for the services to be launched."
                                Most responses to the consultation came from individuals, the majority of whom supported the proposals and believed that, as licence fee payers, they should have maximum access to BBC content. A significant number of responses were received from industry and commercial stakeholders, some of whom reiterated their concerns about the potential for adverse market impact.
                                Diane Coyle said:
                                "The over-riding responsibility of the Trust is to act in the public interest. This means that, when considering the potential market impact of new service applications from the BBC, we must focus primarily on the effect on consumers who enjoy the choice offered by content and services beyond those provided by the BBC.
                                "In our provisional conclusions we proposed a number of modifications to BBC management's plans and sought feedback from the public and the media industry. Having considered the responses carefully, we've made two changes to our provisional conclusions."
                                The two changes are:
                                • Series stacking: The condition attached to this feature has changed. The Trust has taken account of responses from the industry and the BBC Executive, both of whom questioned the Trust's proposal for an editorial definition to minimise market impact, with some commercial companies proposing the facility be removed. But the Trust has also taken note of the public's overwhelming support for this feature. The Trust has decided that the facility for series stacking will remain, but the Trust has applied a 15 per cent annual quota for series stacking with revised editorial guidance to the BBC Executive on the type of series which can be included.
                                • Platform neutrality for DRM downloads over the internet: The condition attached to meeting this objective has changed. The Trust has noted the strong public demand for platform neutrality and is concerned to ensure that the BBC meets this demand as soon as possible. The Trust acknowledges the BBC's commitment to platform neutrality and has taken account of the Executive's response that a two year deadline is unworkable because success is dependent on third parties outside of the BBC's control. However, in the interest of those members of the public who will be disadvantaged until this matter is resolved, the Trust will audit the BBC's progress against this objective every six months and publish its findings.
                                The decision document sets out in full how the Trust has considered the issues raised by respondents to the consultation and the reasons for its decisions. These include:
                                • Use of digital rights management (DRM)
                                • Platform neutrality
                                • Series stacking
                                • Storage window
                                • Non-DRM downloads (book readings and classical music)
                                • Protection of children
                                • Access for third-party content to the BBCiPlayer
                                • Syndication
                                • Bookmarking
                                The BBC's on-demand services as modified and finally approved by the Trust are:
                                Seven-day catch-up television over the internet:
                                • The storage window for TV catch-up over the internet will be set at 30 days from the day of download.
                                • Series stacking is permissible for a total of 30 days, seven days after the last episode of the series. Stacking will be limited to an annual quota of 15 per cent of all content offered on-demand. As guidance to the BBC Executive, series most appropriate for stacking are those with a distinct run, with a beginning and end, and a narrative arc or those with exceptionally high impact. This condition will be reviewed by the Trust after 12 months.
                                • The service will be provided on a platform neutral basis within a reasonable timeframe of launch. The Trust will audit progress every six months.
                                Seven-day catch-up television over cable:
                                • Series stacking as for the internet.
                                Simulcast television over the internet (live streaming of television networks):
                                • No conditions.
                                Non-digital rights management (non-DRM) audio downloads over the internet (podcasting)
                                • Book readings will be excluded entirely from the non-DRM audio download service element.
                                • Classical music will also be excluded, except where it is used in contexts such as incidental music to programmes or as signature tunes.
                                • Existing services on bbc.co.uk to "listen again" to BBC Radio programmes are not affected by the Trust's decisions about downloading services.
                                In addition to the above conditions the Trust will conduct a formal performance evaluation of all the service elements at 24 months from launch.
                                Ends
                                30 April 2007
                                Notes to Editors

                                1. 1) The Public Value Test (PVT) includes a Public Value Assessment (PVA) by the Trust and a Market Impact Assessment (MIA) by Ofcom.
                                2. 2) The Trust's decision document is published in full on the Trust's website, together with:
                                  • analysis of the consultation responses from individuals
                                  • responses in full from 22 organisations
                                  • draft syndication policy statement
                                  The following material was published alongside the provisional conclusions and remains available on the Trust’s website:
                                  • the Executive's proposal
                                  • the Market Impact Assessment and Public Value Assessment
                                  • the Trust's provisional conclusions
                                3. 3) Timeline of the process:
                                  • The BBC Governors announced on 31 August 2006 a Public Value Test on the BBC Executive's proposals to launch new on-demand services
                                  • On 18 September 2006 the details of the Market Impact Assessment (MIA) and the Public Value Assessment (PVA) were announced.
                                  • Additional information on the proposals was published on 10 October 2006 and the period for representations extended to 7 November 2006.
                                  • The MIA process was commissioned and overseen by the Joint Steering Group comprising Ofcom and the BBC Trust and chaired by Ofcom for this MIA. The Joint Steering Group met four times, the last meeting being held on 17 January 2007.
                                  • The BBC Trust's PVT Steering Group met twice since 1 January 2007, the last meeting being held on 18 January 2007.
                                  • On 19 January Ofcom submitted the MIA to the BBC Trust.
                                  • On 23 January 2007 Ofcom published the MIA.
                                  • On 24 January 2007 the BBC Trust approved the PVA as part of the PVT process and evaluated both the MIA and the PVA in reaching its provisional conclusions about the BBC Executive's proposition.
                                  • On 31 January 2007 the BBC Trust published its provisional conclusions, along with other supporting material not previously published, and opened a public consultation. In view of the amount of information being released and that this was a new process, the Trust extended the consultation period from an expected 28 days to eight weeks.
                                  • The consultation closed on 28 March 2007.
                                  • The Trust's PVT Steering Group considered the response to the consultation on 16 April 2007.
                                  • The Trust considered and reached a final decision on the proposals at its meeting on 25 April 2007.
                                  • Monday 30 April 2007 – final decision is published.
                                4. 4) In the Trust's decision document it identifies some lessons from this first Public Value Test and how the Trust will apply these to future PVTs. In particular the Trust expects to publish more information about management's application at the start of future PVTs to keep the whole process to six months with two separate consultation periods of 28 days. The Trust also plans to publish the Public Value Assessment alongside the Market Impact Assessment from Ofcom (the two elements of the analysis in the PVT), in advance of publication of the Trust's provisional conclusions.
                                http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/news/press_releases/30_04_2007.html
                                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X