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Execution Cell Phone Video Creator Arrested

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  • Execution Cell Phone Video Creator Arrested

    I have a great deal of sympathy for this person. Whatever his motiviation, his courage is impressive, unless this is an orchestrated deception on the part of US/Iraqi government. I'm straddling the fence with doubt for both possibilities.

    Iraq arrests witness accused of filming Saddam's execution

    Last Updated: Wednesday, January 3, 2007 | 11:39 AM ET

    CBC News


    The Iraqi government has arrested the person believed to have recorded Saddam Hussein's hanging on a cellphone.
    An adviser to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki would not identify the person, but said it was an official who supervised the execution last Saturday.
    "In the past few hours, the government has arrested the person who made the video of Saddam's execution," the adviser said Wednesday, speaking on condition of anonymity.
    The cellphone video, leaked to the internet and broadcast on Al-Jazeera satellite television, showed Saddam was taunted and insulted by witnesses moments before his death.
    One witness told the deposed Iraqi leader to "go to hell."
    The video, though grainy, also showed a graphic depiction of Saddam's death — he swings by the neck, his eyes open and his head twisted to the right.
    The recording contrasts with the official execution video released by the Iraqi government that was muted and did not contain images of the moments when Saddam died.
    One Iraqi prosecutor who witnessed the hanging said he saw two government officials openly making recordings of the hanging, using the lights already set up for the official execution video.
    "They used their mobile phone cameras," prosecutor Munqith al-Faroon told the Associated Press on Wednesday. "I do not know their names, but I would remember their faces."
    14 officials watched hanging, witness says

    Al-Faroon said there were 14 Iraqi officials, including himself and another prosecutor, at the hanging. Three hangmen were also present.
    The New York Times published an interview with al-Faroon on Wednesday, quoting him as identifying one of the cellphone videographers as Mowaffak al-Rubaie, a national security adviser and close aide to the prime minister.
    On Wednesday, al-Faroon denied he accused al-Rubaie.
    "I am not accusing Mowaffak al-Rubaie, and I did not see him taking pictures," al-Faroon told the Associated Press.
    Reporters were unable to reach al-Rubaie for comment.
    Al-Faroon, who helped convict Saddam of genocide, said he thought witnesses were supposed to turn in their cellphones before arriving at the execution chamber. He said the bodyguards of some officials smuggled phones in for their clients.
    All officials were flown by helicopter to the site of the hanging — a former military intelligence facility where Saddam's own security men executed people for years.
    Saddam's co-defendants to hang Thursday

    Also on Wednesday, an Iraqi government official told the Associated Press that preparations were being made to hang two of Saddam's co-defendants — former intelligence chief Barzan Ibrahim, who is Saddam's half-brother, and Awad Hamed al-Bandar, the former chief justice of the Revolutionary Court.
    The government official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the hangings would occur Thursday, but the exact place and time had not yet been set.
    The two men were originally scheduled to hang on Dec. 30 along with Saddam.
    The witnesses' conduct at the execution, captured on the leaked cellphone video, has sparked outrage among Iraq's Sunni Muslim population.
    The Sunni minority had dominated the government under Saddam, a Sunni, but lost their position of privilege after the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.
    Protests have been held across Iraq.
    Source: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2007/0...am-arrest.html
    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

  • #2
    For me, they should arrest all the Newspaper editors and TV station bosses who showed the obscenity. They probably offered and paid a lot of money.
    I am happy my station didn't reproduce this tasteless stuff that caters to a sick voyeurism. We no longer approve of public execution in our countries, and speaking for Europe alone, neither do we accept executions at all. So why show the last moments of a person, no matter how much we perceive him to be a monster? This is true obscenity for me.
    Google ergo sum

    Comment


    • #3
      As usual it says a lot about the person who would view this kind of stuff.

      Still its interesting that the guy who shot the "unofficial", "unedited" footage is now being arrested on what looks like treason charges. Its quite obvious now why the Iraqi government decided to show the video without any sound, trying to cover up the "sectarian revenge" aspect of the execition.

      They've dug a huge hole for themselves IMO.
      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

      Comment


      • #4
        Boys hanged while 'copying Saddam'

        Looks like a kid did himself in by copying Saddam.

        http://www.itv.com/news/index_12c678...e78c61555.html
        Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Reinart der Fuchs
          I have a great deal of sympathy for this person. Whatever his motiviation
          At the moment I wrote this, greed wasn't one thing I thought of, and now that it's been suggested, I suppose it's the strongest possiblity there is. He must have run to his computer to upload that thing, perhaps with pre-arrangements.

          I feel Americans should view both vidoes, edited and unedited, official and unofficial to witness what it is that will pursue our futures whatever we do, to witness what we've perpetrated and are responsible for. Not everyone who views such videos are voyeurs or lunatics. I would agree that an important percentage of those people viewing this are sick, while the other portion got sick.

          The two videos together are more powerful than a silent "disappearance", and there can be no legendary conspiracy, no "Elvis has left the building." crap. Now there can be no confusion as to what is going on.
          Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

          Comment


          • #6
            I haven't seen the video, but I know its details.

            What troubles me is that the abuse would have gone unreported had someone not captured this video. I'm not arguing that Sadaam deserved anything, nor that any execution can be humane. However, that execution said as much about the state of government and justice in Iraq as it did about Sadaam Hussein. Execution with some sense of respect can at least be called justice (although I don't believe that). As it happened, this execution seemed like vengeance at best, a lynching at worst.

            I find it interesting that people seemed as concerned about finding who shot the video as they were about its implications. It seems very typical Bush-style investigation. Ignore the leaks and focus on the leakers. Maybe the Iraqi government is learning from the U.S., after all...

            I have to take a moment to respond to what RTF said...
            I agree that people should stop and consider what we have sown, and what we are forced to reap. The blood is on our hands, of course.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Reinart der Fuchs
              Looks like a kid did himself in by copying Saddam.

              http://www.itv.com/news/index_12c678...e78c61555.html
              I am very sorry for loss of this little ten yearold boy. What upsets me so much is the parents are blaming the Spanish networks for airing the video over and over. This is where responsible parenting comes into play. Turn the TV off and do not allow impressionable children to watch it!
              What sadder is they'll probably sue the networks and win.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Doc
                What troubles me is that the abuse would have gone unreported had someone not captured this video.
                This is exactly what I was getting at. I also understand L'Etranger's point about televised media making a buck on this. I suppose the 10 year old died because he saw it on TV. It has virual circulation on The Internet. Is there a difference?
                Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                Comment


                • #9
                  To some extent, what happened to those children is little different from past years when children were reported to have died because they tied a towel around their necks and jumped off the roofs of their houses thinking they could fly like Superman. It is tragic, but I think there's a sort of mentality that goes hand-in-hand with that sort of behaviour.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by David Mosley
                    To some extent, what happened to those children is little different from past years when children were reported to have died because they tied a towel around their necks and jumped off the roofs of their houses thinking they could fly like Superman. It is tragic, but I think there's a sort of mentality that goes hand-in-hand with that sort of behaviour.
                    You make a good point.
                    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm actually surprised that the story has not picked up more steam. It is the perfect distraction from what might be most important about executing anyone. It also seems to be the story that would sell better.

                      Apparently the kid was "curious and inquisitive," and apparently at the age where fantasy and reality are not clear in the mind. I suspect he also did not understand the finality of what was happening.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This guy seems to have more in common with the likes of Ahmadinejad than the US is prepared to admit. Some democracy...

                        Iraq PM warns over Saddam hanging

                        Iraqi PM Nouri Maliki has said his government could review relations with any country which criticised the execution of ex-leader Saddam Hussein. Mr Maliki said the hanging was a "domestic affair" for the benefit of Iraq's unity, adding that the former president had received a fair trial.
                        Mobile phone images showing Saddam Hussein being taunted appeared on the internet days after the execution.
                        Several Sunni Arab countries have criticised the hanging as sectarian.
                        We find that this conduct is inciting sedition and flagrant interference in the internal affairs of Iraq and abuses feelings of the families of the victims


                        Nouri Maliki



                        Hanging 'makes martyr of Saddam'


                        Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said it had turned the former leader into a martyr.
                        Mr Maliki's remarks came in a speech to mark Iraqi Army Day, in which he promised to take action against all armed groups in Baghdad.
                        He said that Iraqi troops were now fully prepared to tighten security in the capital with US forces operating in support.
                        The new neighbourhood-by-neighbourhood operation which starts this weekend would be carried out regardless of the groups' political affiliations, he added.
                        The announcement comes only days before US President George Bush is due to outline his new strategy for Iraq.
                        The American president is widely expected to send thousands more troops to Iraq, despite calls from the new Democratic Party leaders of Congress for the US to begin withdrawing its forces.
                        'Disgraceful crimes'
                        But in a speech to mark Iraqi Army Day, Mr Maliki said the decision to execute Saddam Hussein was not a political but a judicial one.
                        CONDEMNED MEN

                        Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti (right) - Saddam Hussein's half-brother, former head of the intelligence service
                        Awad al Bandar - former chief judge of Revolutionary Court



                        Profile: Barzan Ibrahim
                        Verdicts in detail


                        "The decision was implemented after a just trial which the dictator did not deserve as the crimes he committed against the people, the country and its institutions were disgraceful," he said.
                        He attacked criticism of the hanging as provocative and insensitive.
                        "We find that this conduct is inciting sedition and flagrant interference in the internal affairs of Iraq and abuses feelings of the families of the victims," he added.
                        Other members of the former regime would also feel the full force of the law, he said.
                        He was apparently referring to Saddam Hussein's half-brother Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti and former chief judge Awad al-Bandar, both of whom were found guilty at the same time.
                        No date has yet been announced for their execution.
                        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                        Comment

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