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AIDS: Happy birthday!

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  • #2
    I wonder where I can rent one of those spider costumes?

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    • #3
      An animation movie from the association AIDES. Cute.

      (final quote: "live long enough to find the good one")
      Free the West Memphis Three

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      • #4
        Tell that to the people of Africa and Asia...
        Free the West Memphis Three

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        • #5
          Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has rejected calls for the release of six foreign medics sentenced to death for infecting children with HIV/Aids.The medics have protested their innocence throughout, retracting confessions that they said were obtained under torture and arguing that they are being made scapegoats for unhygienic hospitals. The six foreign medics were arrested in 1999. Lawyers for the medics have argued that the HIV virus was present in the hospital, in the town of Benghazi, before the nurses began working there in 1998.

          http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6219027.stm
          He's still out there...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TheAdlerian
            Thankfully the disease has been limited to places where education is limited, but that also means that once info gets there positive things will result.
            I have to question the usage of the word 'thankfully' there?

            I hear it's on the rise again in the UK. 'nuff said.
            He's well smoked

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            • #7
              TheAlderian is very optimistic .... even in places where peopel are educated, after some years, many people forget to protect themselves .... ant the epidemic starts again

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Morgan Kane
                TheAlderian is very optimistic .... even in places where peopel are educated, after some years, many people forget to protect themselves .... ant the epidemic starts again
                C'est vrai, mon ami, voyez vous L'Angleterre!
                Sorry about the bad Francais MK , I was being cynical about our education.
                He's well smoked

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                • #9
                  suicide culture !

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TheAdlerian View Post
                    Hmmm...I've 40 and recall reading about AIDS before it was even called that, and it was projected to be the next Black Plague, and it just wasn't.

                    The disease is not what it was cracked up to be and has stuck to target populations. That's the truth.

                    I must also remind you that I've now worked in human services for over 18 years, so I know a little bit.
                    Morgan is wrong to use the word "epidemia" for it is not... yet. As a virus, HIV is a living and evoluting entity. I met many scientists and searchers who admit that its way of contamination was barely innofensive, considering the way it spreads. Now, imagine a HIV transmitting the same way than flu. It is still possible, especially that the more it is in contact with different people, the more chances it has to mutate. I'm afraid the worst is to come, not to mention the revival of old diseases like plague, as you mentioned it.
                    Free the West Memphis Three

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                    • #11
                      What do we know about viruses?... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus
                      Free the West Memphis Three

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                      • #12
                        Well, that's a point of view...
                        Argument continues over whether viruses are truly alive. According to the United States Code, they are considered micro-organisms in the sense of biological weaponry and malicious use. Scientists however are divided. They have no trouble classifying a horse as living, but things become complicated as they look at simple viruses, viroids and prions. Viruses resemble life in that they possess nucleic acid and can respond to their environment in a limited fashion. They can also reproduce by creating multiple copies of themselves through simple self-assembly.
                        Viruses do not have a cell structure, regarded as the basic unit of life. They are also absent from the fossil record, making phylogenic relationships difficult to determine. Additionally, although they reproduce, they do not metabolise on their own and therefore require a host cell to replicate and synthesise new products. However, bacterial species such as Rickettsia and Chlamydia, while living organisms, are also unable to reproduce outside of a host cell.
                        An argument can be made that all accepted forms of life use cell division to reproduce, whereas all viruses spontaneously assemble within cells. The comparison is drawn between viral self-assembly and the autonomous growth of non-living crystals. Virus self-assembly within host cells also has implications for the study of the origin of life, as it lends credence to the hypothesis that life could have started as self-assembling organic molecules.
                        If viruses are considered alive, then the criteria specifying life will have been permanently changed, leading scientists to question what the basic prerequisite of life is. If they are considered living then the prospect of creating artificial life is enhanced, or at least the standards required to call something artificially alive are reduced. If viruses were said to be alive, the question could follow of whether other even smaller infectious particles, such as viroids and prions, would next be considered forms of life.
                        That is sciences: theories, where the most convenient is chosen until another one has more interest. Where is the truth? Probably out there...
                        Free the West Memphis Three

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