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Tom Laughlin in internet chat on Aug. 2nd!

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  • Tom Laughlin in internet chat on Aug. 2nd!

    Join Tom Laughlin in a Chat!

    WEDNESDAY, August 2- 5-6pm pst


    He has alot of political information about President Bush and the wars.


    He will be on his web site chat room. It might be good to listen to and participate, Tom comes up with some interesting ideas.



    http://www.billyjack.com/



    I have placed some of his quotes, here:


    http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showthread.php?t=3189



    ---------------


    Thanks,


    -Lemec

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

  • #2
    Wow, Billy Jack is back? Hmmm.

    And, hmmm again. Interesting web site. Tom Laughlin and his wife are about to get pretty active with their new film. I wonder what will come of it?

    Comment


    • #3
      It should be interesting and refreshing.


      One thing that I can say about the Billy Jack movies, they are in no way the mainstream. There is a couple good ideas in there.



      Maybe it will get banned, I think one of his 70's films were banned and one was never really released until many years later. (because of the political nature.)


      If he does get financial backers, it should go over pretty good, with the right exposure. It will at least be kinda fun.

      Did you ever see Billy Jack Goes to Washington? It's a fascinating movie for it's time. I think he got away from it being somewhat of an action film, so I expect the new one, if it is in 2007 or 2008 should be all about the government and George Bush and everything else in the world,haha.


      Thanks for the reply!


      -Lemec

      "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
      - Michael Moorcock

      Comment


      • #4
        How'd the chat go?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
          How'd the chat go?


          It was actually postponed to Sunday at 5pm PST.


          I could not believe it,haha, oh well, as long as the chat feature works.

          "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
          - Michael Moorcock

          Comment


          • #6
            Only For You Lemec:

            ONE TIN SOLDIER
            (The Legend of Billy Jack)
            words and music by Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter
            Copyright © 1969 by ABC / Dunhill Music, Inc.

            Listen children to a story that was written long ago
            'bout a kingdom on a mountain and the valley folk below.
            On the mountain was a treasure buried deep beneath a stone,
            and the valley people swore they'd have it for their very own.


            Go ahead and hate your neighbor, go ahead and cheat a friend.
            Do it in the name of heaven, justify it in the end.
            There won't be any trumpets blowin' come the judgment day
            on the bloody morning after one tin soldier rides away.


            So the people of the valley sent a message up the hill
            asking for the buried treasure, tons of gold for which they'd kill.
            Came an answer from the kingdom: "With our brothers we will share
            all the secrets of our mountain, all the riches buried there."


            Go ahead and hate your neighbor, go ahead and cheat a friend.
            Do it in the name of heaven, justify it in the end.
            There won't be any trumpets blowin' come the judgment day
            on the bloody morning after one tin soldier rides away.


            Now the valley cried with anger; mount your horses, draw your sword,
            and they killed the mountain people, so they won their just reward.
            Now they stood beside the treasure on the mountain, dark and red,
            turned the stone and looked beneath it. "Peace on earth" was all it said.


            Go ahead and hate your neighbor, go ahead and cheat a friend.
            Do it in the name of heaven, justify it in the end.
            There won't be any trumpets blowin' come the judgment day
            on the bloody morning after one tin soldier rides away.

            Sang by Skeeter Davis, I remember hearing it over & over on the radio in 72/73. Born Losers is my favorite BJ movie and I still have a copy on VHS.
            Last edited by voilodian ghagnasdiak; 08-04-2006, 10:47 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              voilodian ghagnasdiak,


              Thanks, that is a good song and it draws you into the movie,haha.

              A good "Hippie" song.

              What did you like most about Born Losers?

              During the time I watched all those action type movies, I thought it was cool, how good a shot Billy Jack was with his 30-06. Biker movies were big at the time, I guess. Looking back at those they really painted them as the bad guys, aside from Easy Rider that is.

              I actually saw Billy Jack first, then Born Losers, I did not get to see the other two until 2000.

              The Bong Soo Han's scenes in The Trial of Billy Jack were really cool.

              http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0359147/

              There similarities of scenes in "Trial" when Billy Jack goes into the cave and Luke goes into the cave in Empire Strikes Back are interesting. Tom says on his commentary that Lucas might have been influenced by his movies.

              I liked Billy Jack when I saw it on tv in the 80's, then I got drawn back to the films when Joe Bob Riggs played it on TNT. He did a phone interview with Tom and it was pretty cool.

              "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
              - Michael Moorcock

              Comment


              • #8
                Lemec Wrote
                What did you like most about Born Losers?
                A glutton for eccentricity eehhh?I havent watched it in a while but here goes.

                1:The part of the deaf mute dude that plows his bike into the pond.
                2:The kidnapped chick on the Yamaha wearing the white bikini (with the body of a goddess) for 3/4 of the movie.
                3:Billy's snake trial in the sweathouse.
                4:The prevalence of knuckle, pan, early-generator-shovelheads, BSA's and Triumph's throughout the whole movie.
                5:A Green Beret protects native kids from discrimination at his girlfriends school.
                I can remember when these movies were on in the theatres competing with Walking Tall ( Buford Pusser ).As far as a plot is concerned, it is identical to all of the cheesy B biker movies of that era. Innocent girl gets kidnapped by mc gang and ex-biker or similar anti-hero rescues her at the very end saving her virginity for a future of pure matrimonial bliss.
                That movie does exploit some of the corniest portrayals of bikers ever. Care for some wine with that cheese ??
                Last edited by voilodian ghagnasdiak; 08-04-2006, 04:45 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  hehe, very cool!


                  yep, all good points.


                  The wine for cheese is a good expression, I knew someone who said that alot.



                  "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                  - Michael Moorcock

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tom Laughlin was on the chat.


                    I checked it out.


                    I see,again, that the Forum method is alot better than a chatroom.



                    The chat is very chaotic even when there are only a few on it.


                    The host does not get to say all that much in that manner.


                    Maybe later, he will get a forum going.


                    Either way, it was interesting seeing Tom on there.

                    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                    - Michael Moorcock

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What did he say?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
                        What did he say?

                        Tom talked about Bush and how he was doing the things he does to try to impress his parents.

                        He said how Mel Gibson is pretty much doing the same thing with his father, even if he does not know it consciously.

                        He talked a little about psychology.


                        He talked about trying to get people to buy tickets in advanced to his new movie so he can raise the funds to finish it. hehe

                        He did not really say a whole lot, someone was typing for him while he dictated and the words came on fairly slow.

                        He pretty much repeated what was on his blog and web site.

                        -and answered a few fan questions.


                        Next time it should be better.

                        "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                        - Michael Moorcock

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sound slike Tom needs to learn to type!

                          I read his psychological analyses. I think he is on to something, but there is more to it than is provided for in his mechanistic explanation. He needs to talk with some people who have thought these things through a bit more critically, and hear his views criticized so he can enlarge and refine them. Otherwise, he's just another madman on a mountain.

                          Um, speaking from experience....

                          I wish him well, and I am looking forward to visiting his forum once it's up. Billy Jack is a major dude. Right on, Freedom School!

                          Um, anybody ever see the film "Bless the Beasts and the Children"? Billy Mumy (Will Robinson) in indignant teeny bopper mode. That's who we were back in the day....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
                            Sound slike Tom needs to learn to type!

                            I read his psychological analyses. I think he is on to something, but there is more to it than is provided for in his mechanistic explanation. He needs to talk with some people who have thought these things through a bit more critically, and hear his views criticized so he can enlarge and refine them. Otherwise, he's just another madman on a mountain.

                            Um, speaking from experience....

                            I wish him well, and I am looking forward to visiting his forum once it's up. Billy Jack is a major dude. Right on, Freedom School!

                            Um, anybody ever see the film "Bless the Beasts and the Children"? Billy Mumy (Will Robinson) in indignant teeny bopper mode. That's who we were back in the day....


                            yeah, I agree.


                            no, I have not seen that movie, sounds interesting though. :)

                            "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                            - Michael Moorcock

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In the late sixties author Glendon Swarthout wrote a sad, insightful book about a group of summer camp misfits who run away from their abusive fellow campers to free some buffalo that are part of a lottery where winners get to shoot and kill live 'rotten' buffalo (skinning and stuffing is extra of course). The late Swarthout had it right, a work that portrayed kids and some summer camps as they really are: all-American boys that when away from their mommies and daddies can become little bullies in an environment which places an emphasis on winning. There is no room for losers, cry-babies, bed-wetters or the emotionally disturbed in this particular camp. "You Send Us a Boy....We'll Send You A Cowboy," is its motto and those that do not fit are thrown into a cabin comprised of their own kind. The book focuses on such a group, consisting of two constantly bickering spoiled siblings, a car thief, the son of a Vegas comedian, a feministic bed-wetter who vomits when nervous and a boy who has seen one too many Army movies. Swarthout's novel took this unlikely bunch and makes them into little "heroes" who set out on an adventure and a mission with impossible odds. They succeed but it is in the face of tragedy.

                              Veteran film-maker Stanley Kramer, more suited to big budget films like It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World, decided to take on Swarthout's novel, even going so far as to film an actual buffalo shoot. Telling the excited hunters that he was producing a documentary, Kramer was able to capture some horrifying footage of the random slaughter, much of which remains in the film. When the hunters discovered "what was really going on" Kramer and crew were ordered off the reservation. Using a cast of largely unknowns, Kramer faithfully brought the book to the big screen. Although minor changes were made to some of the book's elements and structure, Bless the Beasts & Children as a film was a powerhouse, remaining to this day one of my favorites and certainly one of the more honest films about kids. Considering that it was released in 1971, the film's language and some material were quite startling at the time. It it still as effective today.

                              It's interesting to note that one instrumental piece known as "Cotton's Dream," first heard in the film at about the one-hour point, would go through two title changes: "Nadia's Theme" and "The Young & The Restless." Regardless of it's popularity long after Bless the Beasts & Children, this music composed by Barry De Vorzon & Perry Botkin Jr. was created for this film alone. A very short soundtrack album featuring the Carpenters theme song, a couple of short vocals (one sung by Paul Williams) and about 20 minutes of score was released by Herb Alpert's A&M Records in 1971 to coincide with the movie. Unlike many soundtracks released today, almost all of the material on the album is actually heard and included in the film. It was a beautiful soundtrack and I would be thrilled beyond comprehension if A&M would re-release this to the CD format.

                              Bless the Beasts & Children is a funny, sad, exciting and ultimately heart-breaking movie that packs more punches than some viewers will likely be able to handle. It's a painfully honest movie about children and it reminds us that through their eyes we often see the darkest part of ourselves and humanity as a whole. Like Glendon Swarthout's novel, Stanley Kramer's film is a genuine masterpiece and one that I cannot recommend highly enough.

                              A note about the content in "Bless the Beasts & Children."


                              The video that was originally released in the U.S. by Columbia Tri-Star incorrectly lists the film as 'R' rated. This is not true. At the time of its release the film was rated GP and included a disclaimer about the use of honest and strong language for dramatic purposes. The film does contain profanity and a few sexual references, but certainly nothing that would earn it an 'R' rating. Although I strongly recommend this movie for adults and kids 12 years and up, I would never even think about showing this in a school or youth organization setting.


                              BLESS THE BEASTS & CHILDREN

                              Music & Lyrics by Barry DeVorzon & Perry Botkin Jr.

                              Originally performed by The Carpenters on the "Song For You" album. Can also be found on various domestic and international Carpenters 'Greatest Hits' and compilation cd's.

                              The Lyrics

                              Bless the beasts and the children...

                              For in this world they have no voice

                              They have no choice...


                              Bless the beasts and the children...

                              For the world can never be
                              The world they see...
                              Light their way
                              When the darkness surrounds them
                              Give them love
                              Let it shine all around them...

                              Bless the beasts and the children...
                              Give them shelter from a storm
                              Keep them safe
                              Keep them warm...

                              Light their way
                              When the darkness surrounds them
                              Give them love
                              Let it shine all around them...

                              Bless the beasts and the children...
                              Give them shelter from a storm
                              Keep them safe
                              Keep them warm...

                              Last edited by nalpak retrac; 08-07-2006, 11:18 PM.

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