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What is the world coming to?

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  • What is the world coming to?

    The other day while in my local supermarket, I went down the book/magazine aisle as I normally do just to see if there are any cheap (which Asda are good at providing) and interesting books on the shelves.

    So I'm standing there, I had already picked out the magazines I wanted and was now staring at the book covers, and standing next to me was this little girl (must've been about 6) and she was looking longingly at the childrens section.

    Her mother (I assumed) approached and the little girl asked if she could have this book that she'd been holding onto. The mother replied "No, books are only for special occasions!" She grabed the book from the little girls hands, placed it back on the shelf and proceeded to drag the crying girl away from the aisle. I just couldn't believe it, I stood there in amazement watching the mother and girl disappear onto the next aisle.

    Seriously, what is the world coming to when parents deny their kids books/literature/educational material of any kind?! Ok perhaps I'm overreacting but this just seems so wrong. If I were a parent I'd be so pleased that my kid had actually wanted to read a book willingly and in her own time, instead of it being forced upon her/him at school etc.
    I would've bought the book myself for her - it was only a couple of pounds - but that might've seemed a bit creepy & interfering.

    But I mean come on, at least the little girl wasn't asking for sweets or the latest toy craze!

    Drives me mad!

    :x

  • #2
    Well, being an optimist at heart, I'll offer a possible (but unlikely) positive spin on the scene: the mother had already bought that particular book for the girl for X-Mas, but didn't wnat to get into an argument or spoil the surprise, so she said the first thing that came into her head.

    Do I believe that? Er... maybe...

    I do recall this summer, and especially rainy day sent a family running into a local second hand book shop, drawn in by the antique nautical instruments in the window. When they discovered that it was "just books" they got out of there fairly sharpish. :(

    In the words of the poet-philosopher Derek Zoolander: "Words can only hurt you if you try to read them. Don't play their game!!"
    "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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    • #3
      It's more likely that the mother simply meant "No, I'm not buying you that book because I don't want you to get into the habit of expecting a present whenever we do the food shopping."

      Such are the politics of raising children.

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      • #4
        Re: What is the world coming to?

        Originally posted by twenty8twelve
        Seriously, what is the world coming to when parents deny their kids books/literature/educational material of any kind?! Ok perhaps I'm overreacting but this just seems so wrong. If I were a parent I'd be so pleased that my kid had actually wanted to read a book willingly and in her own time, instead of it being forced upon her/him at school etc.
        I would've bought the book myself for her - it was only a couple of pounds - but that might've seemed a bit creepy & interfering
        Obviously I don't know anything about this family's circumstances, but have you considered that some families might not have آ£2.00 to spend on a "luxury" like a book. I know that may sound bizarre, but for families on a tight budget آ£2 can mean the difference between having something to eat that night or starving. That's why books might be for "special occasions". Refusing to buy a child a book is not the same thing as denying them access to literature. Most towns have public libraries where there is no charge for borrowing books.

        Of course, if the girl's mother had a shopping trolley full to brimming with Christmas luxuries then her behaviour is less justifiable, but I wasn't there and you were, so only you can judge.
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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        • #5
          I'd be more concerned if the mom had beaten the child bloody.
          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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          • #6
            In fact, the "forbidden-fruit"-method can be quite effective. Perhaps the intention is really to get the kid to read (even secretly) in times when reading is held in very low esteem by all other industries. People might be able to concentrate enough to read their rights, you know, which would upset many an office-holder.
            Google ergo sum

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            • #7
              It's a good rule, never impulse buy for kids just because they ask for something. Even if it's a book. It teaches them all the wrong sorts of lessons.

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              • #8
                My financial situation would be a lot healthier if I followed that rule!
                \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                • #9
                  There is a place and time for impulsiveness, and it doesn't need to be taught. The discipline needs to be taught. It's a very paternalistic response "books are for special occasions". Something that would actually inform a child might have been: "Sorry darling, we can't buy that tonight, because we came to get some beer and diapers for your sister. I have an idea. Let's go to the library on the way home and check out a book there? Do you like that idea?" I suggest directing a child's impulsiveness into patiece with a pay off.
                  The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
                    Something that would actually inform a child might have been: "Sorry darling, we can't buy that tonight, because we came to get some beer and diapers for your sister. I have an idea. Let's go to the library on the way home and check out a book there? Do you like that idea?"
                    I can attest that this is exactly how Berry would have responded to his son. He really is quite good with the little chap. I'm regularly amazed by Berry's mad toddler-rearing skillz.
                    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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                    • #11
                      There's a "who's your daddy" joke in this thread somewhere, but I'm not touching it.

                      Grocery stores bring out the worst in some people.

                      Regardless of motives, I hate it when people make their private things public. That's not right. I hate it when people make private mistakes publicly. I don't mind seeing parents like Berry quietly explaining things to children, but I get embarrassed for people who dismiss or belittle their children in public places. Even if it isn't a pattern, it's the only snapshot I get.

                      And don't get me started on the people who hit their kids in public. I'm not afraid to have a discussion with someone like that. And no, I'm not condoning hitting your children in private.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                        Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
                        Something that would actually inform a child might have been: "Sorry darling, we can't buy that tonight, because we came to get some beer and diapers for your sister. I have an idea. Let's go to the library on the way home and check out a book there? Do you like that idea?"
                        I can attest that this is exactly how Berry would have responded to his son. He really is quite good with the little chap. I'm regularly amazed by Berry's mad toddler-rearing skillz.

                        Okay, PWV, there's a lot I would believe, but not Berry getting his daughter beer when she still needs diapers! Tell that somebody else.
                        Google ergo sum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                          Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
                          Something that would actually inform a child might have been: "Sorry darling, we can't buy that tonight, because we came to get some beer and diapers for your sister. I have an idea. Let's go to the library on the way home and check out a book there? Do you like that idea?"
                          I can attest that this is exactly how Berry would have responded to his son. He really is quite good with the little chap. I'm regularly amazed by Berry's mad toddler-rearing skillz.
                          This might be the nicest thing anyone has ever said about me. :oops:
                          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LEtranger
                            Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                            Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
                            Something that would actually inform a child might have been: "Sorry darling, we can't buy that tonight, because we came to get some beer and diapers for your sister. I have an idea. Let's go to the library on the way home and check out a book there? Do you like that idea?"
                            I can attest that this is exactly how Berry would have responded to his son. He really is quite good with the little chap. I'm regularly amazed by Berry's mad toddler-rearing skillz.

                            Okay, PWV, there's a lot I would believe, but not Berry getting his daughter beer when she still needs diapers! Tell that somebody else.
                            That was quite possibly the worst sentence that I have ever written. :oops:
                            The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Doc
                              There's a "who's your daddy" joke in this thread somewhere, but I'm not touching it.

                              Grocery stores bring out the worst in some people.

                              Regardless of motives, I hate it when people make their private things public. That's not right. I hate it when people make private mistakes publicly. I don't mind seeing parents like Berry quietly explaining things to children, but I get embarrassed for people who dismiss or belittle their children in public places. Even if it isn't a pattern, it's the only snapshot I get.

                              And don't get me started on the people who hit their kids in public. I'm not afraid to have a discussion with someone like that. And no, I'm not condoning hitting your children in private.
                              This is quite possibly the... ah nevermind. :lol:
                              The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                              Comment

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