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Is America moving away from Science...?

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  • Is America moving away from Science...?

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051028/...science_usa_dc

  • #2
    Well, I would not say that the US is moving away from science,but I really don't hear much about it anymore.

    As far as schools go, parents could tell their children thier opinions on evolution. In general schools don't teach evolution until a certain grade when they have to choose what science class to take. If a person does not believe in evolution,they could take a different class.

    On the other hand, schools could present the theory,but not spend alot of time on it. They could explain just enough that relates to their other science studies. The teachers could stick to the facts like they always did in the past.

    It seems that politicians are making too big a deal out of it.

    It would be nice to see an increase in the interest of sciences though.

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

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    • #3
      It smells like a turf war, a ballgame, between the contingent cult of religion and the deteminant cult of science, unhealthy officiated by prestidigitators of media politics in order to...sorry, just woke up :)
      "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Talisant
        It smells like a turf war, a ballgame, between the contingent cult of religion and the deteminant cult of science, unhealthy officiated by prestidigitators of media politics in order to...sorry, just woke up :)
        But the constitution says religion should be separate from Government... including schools. Which is a big problem because at the moment religion is using some not-so-subtle ways to muscle in on Government. Observe the current struggle between science and religion (under the guise of a kind of warped science) about "ID". Reminds me horribly of the Nazi 'science' of Hitler's rule... Choosing the facts to fit the dogma.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by HawkLord
          Originally posted by Talisant
          It smells like a turf war, a ballgame, between the contingent cult of religion and the deteminant cult of science, unhealthy officiated by prestidigitators of media politics in order to...sorry, just woke up :)
          But the constitution says religion should be separate from Government... including schools. Which is a big problem because at the moment religion is using some not-so-subtle ways to muscle in on Government. Observe the current struggle between science and religion (under the guise of a kind of warped science) about "ID". Reminds me horribly of the Nazi 'science' of Hitler's rule... Choosing the facts to fit the dogma.
          I read or possibly mis-read that part of the Constitution to mean that no state religion should be established or installed, meaning that religions should be equally tolerated, and none proscribed.

          That said, I think that for a number of reasons it's silly for religion to be taught in science class, but the world often appears to be a silly place. I'm not necessarily persuaded as to the infallibility of either science or religion. Both science and religion could possibly be addressed together in history class, or in some current events module maybe, where the conflict of the philosophies of both could be examined and explored, but then again realistically, this would be improbable in many schools.

          The N*Z*S were terrible, and their philo/religio smoke screen of A*Y*N*s* was, as you say, tailored info to fit their agenda, however, their science/engineering was quite advanced. Alot of their scientists became essential to Nasa's space program. It's a shame that we can't stop fools from following whoever they will, or stop smarties from foolishly fashioning instruments and methods of destruction.

          It's the people who try to steer the fools and smarties that really concern me. I'm very much more interested in there being a separation between business and government, there seems to be an extremely unhealthy mixing of the two bordering on criminality or worse: Rapacious Design.

          sorry for the rant.
          "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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          • #6
            Isn't this where we're supposed to rant? :D

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doc
              Isn't this where we're supposed to rant? :D
              :up:
              "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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              • #8
                The issue with teaching Intelligent Design in a Science class is that it's not a scientific theory - the key test of a scientific theory is that it can be disproven (and an experiment conducted to test the theory).

                There's also the fact that under the guise of suggesting an intelligent entity designed the world, there's a presumption it's a certain specific one :

                http://www.venganza.org/

                Oh, and it's also just moving the question - any intelligent child or science teacher worth their salt should ask 'where did the Intelligent Creator come from'. Instead, Intelligent Design is presented as an answer.

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                • #9
                  Great link.

                  The same test works for science, religion, and spaghetti too, cook something up, and then throw it at the wall to see if it sticks!!!


                  Also, all three are more palatable when taken with a grain of salt.
                  "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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