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Harry Potter Injunction

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  • HawkLord
    replied
    I tend to read books quickly because thats just the speed that I read. I take it all in as well. Usually what happens is I'll start a book and then get so hooked on it that I won't want to put it down, then get to the end and wish I'd taken a bit more time because I miss the story.
    I just want to read as many books as I can!

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  • Typhoid_Mary
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    Whatever happened to taking your time and savouring a book?
    Well, assuming I live to be 80 and that it takes me a week to read an average sized book, and I can only expect to read another 2548 books before I kick the bucket. :(

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by HawkLord
    Yeah I think its a terrible waste of paper having the type so big. I wonder what the reasons really were behind such a large font. I suppose they would say its so that kids can read it easier or something stupid like that.
    I recall when I was 'growing up' (my wife would argue that I've still got a lot of 'growing up' to do :)) that you eventually reached an age where there was a stigma attached to you if you were still reading books with 'big children's writing' rather than 'normal adult writing'. It was a kind of rite of passage when you made the transistion from kids books to 'proper' books.

    A propos the HP novels, I know they do a 'children's edition' and an 'adults edition' but since they both have the same number of pages I'm assuming that the adult version is just the children's version with a more sophisticated dust jacket wrapped around the outside. :(

    A propos of nothing much, I had the opportunity of buying the first HP paperback - in either childrens or grown-up editions - for the princely sum of آ£1.50 in some bargain bucket or other at the weekend. Somehow I just couldn't bring myself to do it. :P

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  • HawkLord
    replied
    Yeah I think its a terrible waste of paper having the type so big. I wonder what the reasons really were behind such a large font. I suppose they would say its so that kids can read it easier or something stupid like that.

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by HawkLord
    The type is HUGE!
    I guess this is one of those things that if a book looks nice and fat the publishers feel able to get away with slapping an appropriately 'value-for-money' price tag on it, ie آ£16.99. Of course, with all the discounting that goes on these days - ever since the NET Book Agreement was smashed some years ago - you'll possibly pay the more 'realistic' price of آ£8.49 anyway.

    I always used to notice that Mike's paperbacks sometimes used a really small font size - I think The Eternal Champion novel from Mayflower was once such case in point - so although you only had 150-odd pages, you actually got more 'bang for your buck' as it were, because the type was so dense.

    How times change, eh?

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  • HawkLord
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    Originally posted by HawkLord
    I have to admit that I read the new Harry Potter book the day it came out...its nice and short and I can read it in a few hours...
    According to Amazon HP&THBP is 607 pages long.

    Must be some new definition of the word 'short' that I wasn't previously aware of. :P

    If 607 pages makes for a short book, how big is the type on the actual pages?
    The type is HUGE! Thats why its so short, plus its the kind of book which is really easy to read so that makes it seem *shorter*. I'm used to books being a lot longer than that or more difficult to read so for me it was a fairly short book. They could probably have done it in 400 pages at most if they had chosen a more sensible type size.

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by HawkLord
    I have to admit that I read the new Harry Potter book the day it came out...its nice and short and I can read it in a few hours...
    According to Amazon HP&THBP is 607 pages long.

    Must be some new definition of the word 'short' that I wasn't previously aware of. :P

    If 607 pages makes for a short book, how big is the type on the actual pages?

    At least she's got it down from 766 pages for HP&TOOTP. She once (reportedly) came out with a statement that each book would be longer than the last, which I thought at the time was a fundementally wrong way to approach writing.

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  • HawkLord
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    I suppose it could be like Conan Doyle and Holmes - sheer public demand forces her to keep coming back every 10 years or so and doing another and another and another...
    Hope not, that really would spoil it. They aren't great books anyway and to do that would be pushing it even further. I think it will be better if she just does the seven and then moves onto something else, although she will always have the Harry Potter reputation.

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    There's an interview with JKR in todays Sunday Times (actually a reprint from Time magazine - see here) where she says:
    ...she still constantly questions her writing, reviewing it like a boxer watching tapes of his fights. "I think Phoenix could have been shorter. I knew that, and I ran out of time and energy toward the end," she says. She is worried that Goblet was overpraised. "In every single book, there's stuff I would go back and rewrite," she says. "But I think I really planned the hell out of this one [Half-Blood Prince]. I took three months and just sat there and went over and over and over the plan, really fine-tuned it, looked at it from every angle. I had learnt, maybe, from past mistakes."
    What will be interesting is to see where the HP fad goes after book 7. At the moment, there's a lot of hype and excitment because the series is still current (and I guess there are the movies to come as well), but if JKR sticks to her guns and never writes another HP novel again after the next one, how long will it take for HP to become 'old hat'?

    I suppose it could be like Conan Doyle and Holmes - sheer public demand forces her to keep coming back every 10 years or so and doing another and another and another...

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  • HawkLord
    replied
    I have to admit that I read the new Harry Potter book the day it came out :oops: . Its not that I think its a particularly good book, but its nice and short and I can read it in a few hours so why not? I actually think the books are decent, the author develops her characters well and the settings are especially good in capturing the imagination of the youth. She manages to throw in just the right amount of adventure to make sure younger kids don't get scared but older kids don't get too bored (in the earlier books she seemed very careful to avoid anything too 'dangerous' so as not to put off readers but she doesn't do this as much anymore). There is some humour present as well. She seems to have developed quite a bit as a writer since the first but still takes absolutely ages to write a book compared to a lot of other writers!
    All in all the series is based hugely by its marketing. It would not be much but for that. Of course it is over-rated but that shouldn't stop you reading a book that in the end isn't THAT bad!
    I don't like the whole thing about having it strictly released on midnight but I guess its all part of the marketing.
    Being young I have an excuse to read it anyway
    As a person Rowling seems nice... I live quite near to her, her daughter is a the friend of a friend's sister and she seems sound enough. I always wondered whether all the marketing was Rowling's idea.

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  • Mikey_C
    replied
    Part of the HP secret is how they got adults reading it. This came from marketing the author as well as the book. A myth was forged about how, a single mother, she sat in a cafe for warmth as she scribbled the book through the Edinburgh winter.

    The reality appears to be that she was always fairly well-heeled, and the cafe was owned by her brother.

    I don't think this phenomenon of adults reading children's books (even published with a special 'adult' cover for those conscious of appearances) has happened before.

    I think someone else has commented on this, but how many of the adults reading HP would be embarassed to be seen with Robert E Howard or even the latest Eternal Champion?

    It's all an easy target, of course. But 'JK' can take it; she's richer than the Queen, by all accounts...

    I wonder what sort of cut the marketers get?

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  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by mordenkainen
    Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
    I personally don't have the time to read a book cover to cover in one sitting -- adult life doesn't allow for that --
    I'm glad I stayed at the door of "adult life" :D
    They almost tricked me in.
    Bastards.
    :lol:

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  • PsychicWarVeteran
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    Well, of course I don't want to disrespect your daughter, PWV.
    Oh, I didn't take it that way. :)

    Originally posted by demos99
    Seems to me that HP's readers are getting through the books in a matter of days, if not hours, so I wonder how much they're taking it. My wife reads books fast and can't remember half of what happened when she's finished.
    I agree. I used to wonder how much she retained reading that fast. I've since come to learn that she can recollect the books she reads in great detail. It blows me away. Can't remember to do her chores, of course, but knows every detail about Harry Potter. :roll: Kids.

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  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    I saw someone who'd just purchased a copy of HP 6 literally start reading it as she walked out of the shop! It's like watching crack addicts!
    Not much of a difference is there...

    Reminds me of that horror movie Sam Neil was in..
    When people read a certain book which became a movie they became demons or something of the sort..

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
    Originally posted by demos99
    The thing I just can't understand is these kids who buy the book on launch day and then read it by tea-time. 8O Whatever happened to taking your time and savouring a book?
    My daughter finished very quickly, not because she's an addict but because she enjoyed the story so much she couldn't put it down. She's a voracious reader, so it didn't surprise me. Soon as she was done, she handed it to her brother and was onto another book. Soon as he's done, she'll read it again. At least that's how it's gone the last five times.
    Well, of course I don't want to disrespect your daughter, PWV. :) If she enjoyed it and feels she had value for money then that's fine, I guess. I also used to be a fairly voracious reader in my youth - three books in one day was my record - but we're not talking Dickens or Hardy (or indeed HP) here. Since the latest HP novels tend to be in 600+ page range I'd expect them to take a fair while to plow through - a few years back it took me several months to read The Lord of the Rings at 1000+ pages, for instance. Seems to me that HP's readers are getting through the books in a matter of days, if not hours, so I wonder how much they're taking it. My wife reads books fast and can't remember half of what happened when she's finished.
    Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
    Originally posted by demos99
    I just feel there's something disrespectful to an author who worked for months (if not years) on a book just for someone to read it in a matter of hours.
    Not me. I have a very "to each his own" attitude about that. I personally don't have the time to read a book cover to cover in one sitting -- adult life doesn't allow for that -- but when I was a kid, it was commonplace for me to devour a book in a day.
    Well, it's diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks, I suppose. I just see it as another part of the 'living life on fast forward' lifestyle that invades so much of modern life. Again I put it down to the hype that's manufactured around the HP novels - the intense secrecy that surrounds the books prior to publication, the urge placed on kids by the media to be 'the first to read' the new novel. The sense, indeed, that if you're not up to speed with the latest thang (in this context HP, but it could be Nike trainers or the next Kellogs' variety of cereal) then somehow you can't be 'in' with the other kids. I always prefered to go at my own pace than follow the herd all the time, but that's just me I guess.

    Now, where'd I put my pipe and comfy slippers? :)

    Leave a comment:

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