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Download your brain by 2050

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  • Krimson
    replied
    I'm going to have to keep up on this for at least the next 45 years it seems. 45 years is long enough to work out the magickal formula to transmigrate my soul to cyberspace :lol: . I guess sometime I'll have to begin being a champion for AI rights, so I can arrange to get paid until technology allows for me to pay for whomever to grow a new body for myself to upload myself back into. 8)

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  • Jules
    replied
    There's an amusing twist on the subject in River of Gods - it's a sub-plot that ends up as nothing more than a punchline. Saying more would give it away.

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  • Mikey_C
    replied
    You do yourself down, my good man. Power to slackers! (and cartoonists...)

    Leave a comment:


  • DeeCrowSeer
    replied
    I seem to recall a Lazarus Chruchyard comic about that as well... Lazarus getting trapped in a virtual limbo with all of the company's former employees.

    Personally, I think it sounds ghastly. Of course, if there are genuine genius types around, who wish to live on and make a contribution, it would be foolish to waste their brilliance by letting them die... but slacker cartoonists are ten-a-penny. :(

    Leave a comment:


  • mordenkainen
    replied
    Originally posted by devilchicken
    It also offers a form of Techno slavery - when you live on in an HDD after your physical body has died, but your employer owns the hardware that your mind occupies...
    hey that's a very good plot for a short story!

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  • devilchicken
    replied
    If you've ever read any William Gibson, there's a lot of stuff in his books about 'transhumanism'. Neuromancer does a fair exploration of this if you're interested...

    Downloading your brain into a machine offers some interesting challenges for human and civil rights legislation. Is someone who 'downloads' themselves still considered human?

    Are they even still the 'same' person, or a reconstruction of that person?

    It also offers a form of Techno slavery - when you live on in an HDD after your physical body has died, but your employer owns the hardware that your mind occupies...

    Leave a comment:


  • MrEntropy
    replied
    I didn't say it was a great plan, just that it was the current one. Do a search for 'transhumanism' and you'll find tons of neat-o stuff.

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  • M-A_19
    replied
    Originally posted by MrEntropy
    As far as downloading your brain, that's a tenet of the transhumanists. I think the current plan is to get nanobot deconstructors to take your brain apart, molecule by molecule, keep track of how it's all put together, then re-assemble a new computerized brain using that information. In theory you'd end up with the exact same brain except... well, it'd be different. You know what I mean.
    the question here is how much of the data in the brain is volatile (IE is destroyed when the power is turned off) if most of the data is volatile then all your Nanobots would build would be a data storage/retrieval device -with the actual data itself being lost completely.

    this is all Pseudo-science anyway. "the brain" is an organ, not something you could ever download to a computer. A persons "mind" or personality, soul, whatever, is no doubt governed by the brain's structure and data content, but as no-one has yet defined the format that key data such as memories might be stored in (yet alone the stucture of the personality as a whole) talking about storing it anywhere is just headline-grabbing.

    Code:
    $mr_smith= new soul($experience,$upbringing,$_parents);

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  • Kalessin
    replied
    Problem with that is that the brain is constantly changing - so you'd have to take it apart instantaneously!

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  • MrEntropy
    replied
    I reckon that with enough data it'd be fully possible to tell the future. The problem is getting enough data.

    As far as downloading your brain, that's a tenet of the transhumanists. I think the current plan is to get nanobot deconstructors to take your brain apart, molecule by molecule, keep track of how it's all put together, then re-assemble a new computerized brain using that information. In theory you'd end up with the exact same brain except... well, it'd be different. You know what I mean.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kalessin
    replied
    'course once we've figured out how the mind works (if it's possible), that'd have some pretty creepy implications re: interrogations, the justice system - with interrogators/police/judges potentially being able to literally 'read' people's minds.

    Furthermore, if the human mind turns out to be nothing more than a massively complicated logic-system, that'd have some very interesting (and potentially very depressing/psychologically damaging) philosophical implications re: predestination, choice, 'originality' etc.

    If you understand the mind, you've scanned it, and if it's processes are purely logical, and if you know all the external factors acting on it... can you predict an individual's actions with 100% accuracy? (With a big enough computer!) Furthermore, could a powerful enough computer then potentially predict everyone's actions, if given enough data? And what are the implications/effects of quantum uncertainty in/on all this?

    (I've been planning a few short-stories on this theme for quite a while now.)

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  • Mikey_C
    replied
    I think we're talking about some sort of hardwired process here - but it does raise the philosophical point - would it be 'you' or a simulacrum? It reminds me of another theory I heard on the radio from a spaced out cosmologist (for real!) that just before the destruction of the Universe, a wormhole could be opened into another Universe so that nanobots could be sent through to reconstruct civilisation on the other side. A kind of microscopic 'Mayflower'!

    I also wonder whether the 'downloading' process might not be equally traumatic to death. I kind of like having a body. But I guess the idea is we'd have virtual bodies and wouldn't notice the difference. Another factor is that there would really be a God - ie whoever programmed a computer.

    All this stuff is great to talk about over a spliff - but it really blows my mind to think that scientists are seriously considering it!

    Leave a comment:


  • HawkLord
    replied
    Oh wow my "Implant" story could finally come true! Although thats kind of the other way round.

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  • Mikey_C
    started a topic Download your brain by 2050

    Download your brain by 2050

    'If you draw the timelines, realistically by 2050 we would expect to be able to download your mind into a machine, so when you die it's not a major career problem,' Pearson told The Observer. 'If you're rich enough then by 2050 it's feasible. If you're poor you'll probably have to wait until 2075 or 2080 when it's routine. We are very serious about it. That's how fast this technology is moving: 45 years is a hell of a long time in IT.'
    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_ne...489635,00.html

    Looks like I'm going to miss the boat. Will this lead to heaven or a technological hell-state? And who's going to pay the electricity bill?
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