Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Wallerstein

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Rymdolov
    Theocrat: Did you know that Wallerstein has been published in Swedish, by Vertigo? http://www.vertigo.se

    I haven't read him, though. Just thought I'd let you know (it's the librarian in me). :)
    Thanks!
    I knew that some of his works got translated. But i've already ordered the english versions. Sorry man but i think it's better to read them in their original language. If it is the original language?

    Vet du nأ¥gra bأ¶cker av Gramsci som أ¤r billiga? Jag hittade nأ¥gra bأ¶cker som lأ¥g vid tusenkronorsgrأ¤nsen... 8O

    Leave a comment:


  • Rymdolov
    replied
    Theocrat: Did you know that Wallerstein has been published in Swedish, by Vertigo? http://www.vertigo.se

    I haven't read him, though. Just thought I'd let you know (it's the librarian in me). :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc
    Originally posted by Theocrat
    Originally posted by Doc
    Theocrat, you always find the interesting sociologists.

    Anything that gives you insight into world systems theory is worth your time. Wallerstein shows the multidimensional nature of global stratification and how the ties that bind nations together are also parts of the mechanisms of inequality. Many people who have used his basic ideas in their own work on globalism fail to realize the ideas aren't "public knowledge." That's one measure of his influence.
    So his ideas are useless? is that what you are saying (or am i jumping to conclusions here?)

    Alas i find any "World System" to be erroneous. Because 'systems' are derivative and comprimised from personal political ideas.

    Sorry to be short, I have no time. Actually, I'm saying the opposite. His ideas are quite powerful. You may also re-think your ideas about systems.

    Too bad about hypocritical political activists. I guess you put "politic" in something and hypocricy follows...
    So he doesn't put any politics to his work? Or am i wrong?
    Would make him a more interesting writer to read.

    Maybe you are right. But alas.. Chomsky claimed many political activists and writers to be "hypocrites".

    But in reality i'm not an activist. At least not yet. I've yet to hear from the leftists or other political 'active' groups in my town. I tried reaching them but they seemed to defensive and on guard to anyone asking if they are "left-wing". And they are wondering why the right-wing coalition is getting more votes?

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Theocrat
    Originally posted by Doc
    Theocrat, you always find the interesting sociologists.

    Anything that gives you insight into world systems theory is worth your time. Wallerstein shows the multidimensional nature of global stratification and how the ties that bind nations together are also parts of the mechanisms of inequality. Many people who have used his basic ideas in their own work on globalism fail to realize the ideas aren't "public knowledge." That's one measure of his influence.
    So his ideas are useless? is that what you are saying (or am i jumping to conclusions here?)

    Alas i find any "World System" to be erroneous. Because 'systems' are derivative and comprimised from personal political ideas.

    Sorry to be short, I have no time. Actually, I'm saying the opposite. His ideas are quite powerful. You may also re-think your ideas about systems.

    Too bad about hypocritical political activists. I guess you put "politic" in something and hypocricy follows...

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc
    Theocrat, you always find the interesting sociologists.

    Anything that gives you insight into world systems theory is worth your time. Wallerstein shows the multidimensional nature of global stratification and how the ties that bind nations together are also parts of the mechanisms of inequality. Many people who have used his basic ideas in their own work on globalism fail to realize the ideas aren't "public knowledge." That's one measure of his influence.
    So his ideas are useless? is that what you are saying (or am i jumping to conclusions here?)

    Alas i find any "World System" to be erroneous. Because 'systems' are derivative and comprimised from personal political ideas.

    I tried to talk to leftist politicians tonight and they wouldn't talk to me.
    Go figure... A Worker not getting recognition from a political ideoligy that claims "the means of production" as it's main political and social resource.
    Getting the cold shoulder in a disscusion. When they argue that the workers and sweatshop age the workforce and keep their wagers low.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Theocrat, you always find the interesting sociologists.

    Anything that gives you insight into world systems theory is worth your time. Wallerstein shows the multidimensional nature of global stratification and how the ties that bind nations together are also parts of the mechanisms of inequality. Many people who have used his basic ideas in their own work on globalism fail to realize the ideas aren't "public knowledge." That's one measure of his influence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikey_C
    You're keeping me on my toes here - I didn't immediately recognise his name, but checked some reviews on Amazon and realised we'd touched on his 'world-systems' theory in the globalisation module of my course. I reckon his stuff would be well worth reading.
    Originally posted by Immanuel Wallerstein
    "In the history of the world, military power has never been sufficient to maintain supremacy. Legitimacy is essential, at least legitimacy recognised by a significant part of the world. With their preemptive war, the American hawks have undermined very fundamentally the U.S. claim to legitimacy. And thus they have weakened the United States irremediably in the geopolitical arena."
    Thinking about ordering those 2 books. (Many books on my wishlist now Thank god for online bookshops.. Maybe not..)

    I think he is right about that "military power has never been sufficient to maintain supremacy". It's no coincidence that the US keeps getting called Rome. And Rome had lots of troubles maintaining the borders and body politics due to over-expansion of military and social standards (et al slaves). Todays "Wage-Slaving" can't go on forever.

    I heard from a Roman historian that the goths and other invaders got to pass freely into Rome by the perifery. Being 'fed-up' with The Roman order.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikey_C
    replied
    You're keeping me on my toes here - I didn't immediately recognise his name, but checked some reviews on Amazon and realised we'd touched on his 'world-systems' theory in the globalisation module of my course. I reckon his stuff would be well worth reading.
    Originally posted by Immanuel Wallerstein
    "In the history of the world, military power has never been sufficient to maintain supremacy. Legitimacy is essential, at least legitimacy recognised by a significant part of the world. With their preemptive war, the American hawks have undermined very fundamentally the U.S. claim to legitimacy. And thus they have weakened the United States irremediably in the geopolitical arena."

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    started a topic Wallerstein

    Wallerstein

    What can you guys say about this guy and his books about 'The End Of The World As We Know It' and 'Liberalisms End'?
Working...
X