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Homeland Security vs "Resilience"

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  • Homeland Security vs "Resilience"

    Is it me (and it probably is) or does the naming of the American and British concepts of how to fight the "War on Terror" on our own respective soils show a difference in our respective psychologies.

    "Homeland Security" to me implies a possible perfect state - security guards who ensure that nothing harmful gets into the country (although guys can just walk onto planes in Washington going to London Heathrow with a pocketful of bullets without being challenged until they land. Thanks, lads)

    "Resilience" implies that something will, inevitably, get through, but we will go on, regardless. It's the cultural successor to Churchill's repeated statements 1939-45 that we would continue with "Business As Usual". When one considers that London's, and therefore England's, financial centre has been within four hundres yards of where the Bank of England sits for just under two thousand years without significant interruption, come fire, flood, bombing, invasion, it's no understatement that the phrase "business as usual" is at the core of our very mindset as a culture.

    I get very worried by all the anti terror laws, both in place and proposed, in this country, that have the knock on effect of both eroding our hard won freedoms (and it took us a looooong time to get to where we are), and undermining our national confidence that, whatever happens, we'll just get back up and rebuild. It's not for nothing that above the door to St Paul's Cathedral Wren put the word "Resurgam", y'know.

    In all honesty, I think the best anti-terror plan we could put into effect would be to run down to the white cliffs of Dover, and write "come and have a go if you think you're hard enough" on them in enormous letters.

    Any thoughts on what "homeland security" says about your national character, o children of Amarek?

    Hugs

    Jeremiah

  • #2
    Re: Homeland Security vs "Resilience"

    Originally posted by Jeremiah
    Is it me (and it probably is) or does the naming of the American and British concepts of how to fight the "War on Terror" on our own respective soils show a difference in our respective psychologies.

    "Homeland Security" to me implies a possible perfect state - security guards who ensure that nothing harmful gets into the country (although guys can just walk onto planes in Washington going to London Heathrow with a pocketful of bullets without being challenged until they land. Thanks, lads)

    "Resilience" implies that something will, inevitably, get through, but we will go on, regardless. It's the cultural successor to Churchill's repeated statements 1939-45 that we would continue with "Business As Usual". When one considers that London's, and therefore England's, financial centre has been within four hundres yards of where the Bank of England sits for just under two thousand years without significant interruption, come fire, flood, bombing, invasion, it's no understatement that the phrase "business as usual" is at the core of our very mindset as a culture.

    I get very worried by all the anti terror laws, both in place and proposed, in this country, that have the knock on effect of both eroding our hard won freedoms (and it took us a looooong time to get to where we are), and undermining our national confidence that, whatever happens, we'll just get back up and rebuild. It's not for nothing that above the door to St Paul's Cathedral Wren put the word "Resurgam", y'know.

    In all honesty, I think the best anti-terror plan we could put into effect would be to run down to the white cliffs of Dover, and write "come and have a go if you think you're hard enough" on them in enormous letters.

    Any thoughts on what "homeland security" says about your national character, o children of Amarek?

    Hugs

    Jeremiah
    I think it's just a plan to control the people and not the terrorists.
    Create an aura of fear and you could do anything.
    If they really wanted something done they wouldn't do
    it at the expense of freedom.
    "There is nothing to fear, but 'fear' itself!" i always keep saying,
    as it is true for any nation.

    Comment


    • #3
      I recall a political cartoon that came out around the time the whole "Homeland Security" thing was starting to boil. It depicted government workers removing the boards from a family's house (thus removing their privacy) in order to build, with those same boards, a fence around the bemused-looking family (thus protecting them).

      What good is my safety from terrorists if my own government can just pop in and spy on me?

      I think we need a balance between the notions of 'security' and 'resilience.' I have learned martial arts, for example, so that I have some sort of security on the streets, but also extended my threshold of pain so that when I am beaten, I can withstand it and fight on. To focus on only one of the two aspects is folly.

      But how do we become resilient? What steps can we take? Your cliffs of Dover comment is humorous, but what can America do, seriously, to make itself more resilient without becoming an agressive, fascist regime?
      "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
      --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran

        What good is my safety from terrorists if my own government can just pop in and spy on me?
        I really am beginning to ask the question, security from whom? There's that whole issue of who watches the guardians.


        Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
        But how do we become resilient? What steps can we take? Your cliffs of Dover comment is humorous, but what can America do, seriously, to make itself more resilient without becoming an agressive, fascist regime?
        What do you mean "becoming?" :x

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Doc
          What do you mean "becoming?" :x
          Maybe I'm going out on a limb which is likely to be burned off due to all the flaming I'm going to get, but...

          It's my not-so-humble opinion that America has become a nation of wussies. Resilience is not a word we have the luxury of throwing about when die-hard, vocal lefties like Dennis Miller and Kelsey Grammer become solid Bush supporters after a couple buildings fall down. Wussies! I hear people constantly barking about "giving the terrorists what they deserve wherever they are." But these same people are simply frightened children, wanting daddy to go beat up all the Nelson Muntzes of the world. They're pitiful.

          Terrorists have existed and threatened humanity for a long damn time and -- history lesson, kids -- at times we've supported them! They need to be stopped, yes, but intelligently and rationally, not in such obtuse, reactionary fashion.

          It saddens me that bin Laden's attack worked so well -- that so many Americans now live in such fear that they will happily sign off on disorganised killing in whatever country might just harbor a terrorist or two, regardless of the costs involved. So they vote for Bush the Great Warrior and applaud him for sending their children to kill and/or die overseas.

          It's just a large-scale version of the frightened twelve-year-old who packs a gun. No inner strength, just the violent facade of it. No respect from his peers, either, just uncertainty and more fear.
          "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
          --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll go out on a different limb...

            We're not just, as PWV puts it, "becoming a nation of wussies," we're also quickly becoming a nation of fascists. The two aren't unconnected.

            Think about it-- extreme nationalism, silencing dissent, elevation of the military...

            I could go on, but I won't. Part of my point is that the first people to embrace those things are also the first people to roll over for the people who propogate the actions. Bravery isn't just about "standing up to terrorists," it's about standing up for real freedom--not the freedom that is being pitched as a bumper-sticker buzzword. I'm talking about freedom of expression, of gathering, of the press, of independent thought...

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree, Doc, I think the two are strongly connected. I tried to express that idea. Indeed, the dad that would go around thrashing every bully that picked on his kid could be described as taking a fascist attitude about the matter.
              "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
              --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, you mentioned (on a different thread) that you love a good analogy. I think you just found an apt one. Of course, the US may not be wearing a sweat-stained, cheap white undershirt while it does its dirty work. :lol:

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doc
                  I'll go out on a different limb...

                  We're not just, as PWV puts it, "becoming a nation of wussies," we're also quickly becoming a nation of fascists. The two aren't unconnected.

                  Think about it-- extreme nationalism, silencing dissent, elevation of the military...
                  I think this has alot more to do with the 'global econonomy' being more and more stressed. America 'is' losing it's identity more and more as being the beacon of freedom that they so often want to express in media.
                  So much, in fact, as to almost have to ripp up the consitutional laws it was founded on.

                  Capitalists are becoming more and more anxious as many people below them are losing money and falling down a pit. So they thought more markets could save them from falling. All the small fish in the tank have been eaten so to speak.

                  It can become a vicious cycle in the end.. When the snake keeps eating it's tail.[/quote]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                    Originally posted by Doc
                    What do you mean "becoming?" :x
                    I hear people constantly barking about "giving the terrorists what they deserve wherever they are." But these same people are simply frightened children, wanting daddy to go beat up all the Nelson Muntzes of the world. They're pitiful.

                    Terrorists have existed and threatened humanity for a long damn time and -- history lesson, kids -- at times we've supported them! They need to be stopped, yes, but intelligently and rationally, not in such obtuse, reactionary fashion.

                    I
                    Here here! (os possible hear hear. I speak the damn language and I still don't understand bits...oh well)

                    I think part of the surge of worldwide anti-American feeling recently is due to a sense of being let down. You're supposed to be the good guys, and when you go round acting like the bad guys, or even just plain non-heroic, it hurts us far more than if a country about whom we have no preconceived ideas (Denmark, say. I know nothing of Denmark) suddenly starts acting in a less than fabulous way.

                    I saw an episode of "Law and Order: Criminal Intent" the other night that was my first impression from the American media in a loooong time that the American people might just be regaining some of the sense of decency, justice, and plain good sense that really did make so much of the world think "democracy. What a good idea."

                    And about time, too.

                    Hugs

                    Jeremiah

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