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Harry The Nazi

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  • #76
    Originally posted by Theocrat
    Come On? Nazi-Buddhists? *R.O.F.L.*
    :lol:
    Not so unlikely as might seem: http://www.american-buddha.com/fascist.occult.htm

    However, the swastika also has nordic roots:
    The Swastika

    The swastika is an ancient Indian symbol of immuآ­table good luck. “Swastikaâ€? is an Anglicization of the Sanآ­skrit word svastika, which means well-being or good luck. Used by Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains for thousands of years, it became widespread in Tibet as well.

    The swastika has also appeared in most other ancient cultures of the world. For example, the counterclockwise variant of it, adopted by the Nazis, is also the letter “G� in the medieval Northern European Runic Script. The Freemasons took the letter as an important symbol, since “G� could stand for God, the Great Architect of the Universe, or Geometry.

    The swastika is also a traditional symbol of the Old Norse God of Thunder and Might (Scandinavian Thor, German Donner, Baltic Perkunas). Because of this association with the God of Thunder, the Latvians and Finnish both took the swastika as the insignia for their air forces when they gained independence after the First World War.

    In the late nineteenth century, Guido von List adopted the swastika as an emblem for the Neo-Pagan movement in Germany. The Germans did not use the Sanskrit word swastika, however, but called it instead “Hakenkreutz,� meaning “hooked cross.� It would defeat and replace the cross, just as Neo-Paganism would defeat and replace Christianity.

    Sharing the anti-Christian sentiment of the Neo-Pagan movement, the Thule Society also adopted the Hakenkreutz as part of its emblem, placing it in a circle with a vertical German dagger superimposed on it. In 1920, at the suggestion of Dr. Friedrich Krohn of the Thule Society, Hitler adopted the Hakenkreutz in a white circle for the central design of the Nazi Party flag. Hitler chose red for the background color to compete against the red flag of the rival Communist Party.

    The French researchers Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier, in Le Matin des Magiciens (The Morning of the Magicians) (1962), wrote that Haushofer convinced Hitler to use the Hakenkreuz as the symbol for the Nazi Party. They postulate that this was due to Haushofer’s interest in Indian and Tibetan culture. This conclusion is highly unlikely, since Haushofer did not meet Hitler until 1923, whereas the Nazi flag first appeared in 1920. It is more likely that Haushofer used the widespread presence of the swastika in India and Tibet as evidence to convince Hitler of this region as the location of the forefathers of the Aryan race.
    http://www.berzinarchives.com/kalach...ala_tibet.html

    I think we can safely say that all of this is lost on Prince Harry - unless he is attempting to reestablish the tantric kingdom of Shambhala... If so, he's not going the right way about it.
    \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Theocrat
      ...

      I even saw a reporter on swedish TV having to explain away a buddhist temple having a swastika in the background during an interview etc.. Weird and surreal in a way. Come On? Nazi-Buddhists? *R.O.F.L.*
      :lol:
      Fortean Times Message Board> Esoterica> Dead Tibetans in WW2 Berlin???

      The story of the corpses of Tibetans in SS uniforms being found amongst the ruins of Berlin, by the Red Army, may originally have been mentioned in Pawel and Bergier's Morning of the Magicians.
      Pravda: The policy of blood and mysticism
      2002-09-12

      ...

      It is also worth mentioning that Ahnenerbe maintained contacts with Tibet. When Soviet troops entered Berlin in 1945, they were very surprised to find thousands of Tibetan corpses in SS uniforms.

      ...
      Unfortunately, since the fall of the Soviet Union, Pravda appears to have become about as reliable a source of news as The Weekly World News.

      8)

      Comment


      • #78
        Oh, it was no myth about Hitler believing in Vril - there was even a Vril Society of so-called adepts.
        But being a vegetarian, he'd have steered clear of Bo-vril.

        I've heard the "tibetans in SS uniforms" tale many times before - but is it just urban myth? Surely with the opening of the Soviet files we'd have seen the evidence. The Chinese would have an interest in publicising it - they certainly drew attention to Heinrich Harrer's nazi past when "Seven Years in Tibet" came out (although Brad Pitt's blowdry and fake Austrian accent are probably even more offputting).
        \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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        • #79
          Morning of the Magicians, though full of tasty myths, is about as accurate a text as anything by von Daniken. It was a big best-seller in France and elsewhere in the early 60s but was rapidly exposed as a concoction, where dates were frequently altered to make arguments. I used some of it, however, for the Lappland sequences of The Final Programme. I suspect bits of Raiders of the Lost Ark also came from that source. The stuff appeared originally in magazine form in France and I used to have some of the copies, but can't locate them now. There's no doubt that Hess was obsessed with loony theories, but most of Hitler's didn't come from mysticism, they came from loony racial notions, most of them originating in America. Le Matin de la Magiciens was translated as The Dawn of Magic in the UK. The authors also spoke of an expedition sent by Hitler to discover the source of 'the Hollow Earth'. Again, I don't think there's much evidence for such an expedition being sent. Much of the origin of such ideas comes from the belief that Hitler employed astrologers to guide him in his war plans. Given the vast amount of research which has been done, I've yet to read much that convinces me such notions were central to Hitler. Indeed, in my view such theories tend to be a distraction from serious study of Nazism and the Nazis. I suspect that Hitler would have got a job in advertising if he hadn't gone into politics. Another reason we have to regret he didn't get into art school. He and some of those surrounding him had an excellent sense of design. In this sense they were the first modern politicians -- using visual media, radio and all the paraphernalia of modern spin politics to get their ideas across. Studying that aspect of the Nazis helps us understand what's going on in, say, recent Republican campaigning.
          I've heard arguments that Stalin much admired Hitler's understanding of the psychology of crowds and imitated him. It's interesting to note that Nazi uniforms, certainly after 1933, took on a much more modern look than, say, Italian Fascist uniforms. Without wishing to sound cynical, I think there's a good book to be written on Nazism as Fashion.

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          • #80
            Originally posted by TheAdlerian
            The "Nazis had nice clothes and didn't eat" is one of my jokes about how they will be remembered in a few generations!

            They did have an interesting uniform especially the SS. I can remember a long time ago my brother and I were watching a movie and we both guiltily exclaimed, are other cool uniforms or what! That had to be part of the marketing, however, I would like to know if it was on purpose or not.
            Remember that the next time you happen to watch Paul Verhoeven's StarShip Troopers. Verhoeven's just old enough to remember the garrisoned Nazi troops marching around the seaside resort and sand dunes of Scheveningen, location of the infamous 'Orange Hotel': a Gestapo prison where they held members of the Dutch Resistance, and where they were also launching V2's amongst the dunes.

            I've a friend who's even more of a Verhoeven fan than I am and we both reckon his film version of Robert E. Heinelein's book is the most extraordinary and bitter satire on US military ambitions. But, check out the sharp and classy uniforms.

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            • #81
              Re: Disturbing

              And the views of S. America are often suspect, especially in Argentina, since it became such a haven for Nazi war criminals. I'm rarely surprised by Nazi apologism coming from a South America, I've heard it enough in my time. But many others worldwide from numerous nations have been guilty of this.


              Hi, this is totally untrue. It's just old punishment propaganda of that time, because Argentina remained neutral during wartime. Also we are one of the countries with more jews, and definately the first in Latin America. That seems to be contradictory doesn't it?

              8)

              Comment


              • #82
                It's not too great now - only Mitcham is worse - an idyllic-looking English village with a pond near the Common, a hideous socio-architectural dystopia from Ridley Scott's cutting room floor at t'other.
                'Course, Leeds facades are still the epitome of beauty: along with the hidden 'gunnels' and the vaulted arches of what is now called 'The Victoria Quarter'. But it's the curious mercantile filigree of the more obscure buildings that really is amazing.

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                • #83
                  Re: Disturbing

                  Originally posted by El Octogono
                  And the views of S. America are often suspect, especially in Argentina, since it became such a haven for Nazi war criminals. I'm rarely surprised by Nazi apologism coming from a South America, I've heard it enough in my time. But many others worldwide from numerous nations have been guilty of this.


                  Hi, this is totally untrue. It's just old punishment propaganda of that time, because Argentina remained neutral during wartime. Also we are one of the countries with more jews, and definately the first in Latin America. That seems to be contradictory doesn't it?

                  8)
                  Sorry, but it is true mostly. Where did Mengele hide, where Eichmann, Klaus Barbie and who were those nice elderly gentlemen in Bariloche? Dozens of examples. And why exactly where so many countries so reluctant to join in the war against Hitler? Peron admired the Nazis quite a bit.
                  Google ergo sum

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                  • #84
                    there was a documentary on t.v. the other day about this. According to the show:

                    Peron did greatly admire the Nazi regiem and tactics; not necessarily their beliefs. He invited many ex-nazi's to Argentina and employed them in his service. Involved people interviewed claim they left their beliefs behind and no one speaks of their German military associations. There is still a very stong German "presence" in many areas.

                    As an interesting side-note: Vintage watches are a hobby of mine. I see many, many watches from the WWII era coming up for auction from Argentina with Jewish names inscribed on the backs of the watchcases. Not sure if there's any connection, but it makes you think...
                    \"No, I think Space is a dimension of Time. My theory is that Time is a field and that Space exists as an aspect of Time.\" Michael Moorcock

                    \"All I know about anything is \"I wasn\'t. I am. I will not be.\" Michael Moorcock

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                    • #85
                      Well, maybe some came here. There are many regions with Germans but not necessarily ex-nazis. I myself went many years on vacation to one of those towns.

                      We had a huge european inmigration after ww2 and accepted everyone.

                      Anyway my intention was also to dismiss that there is a pro nazi sentiment, at least not in the last 20 years. There seems to be the idea that jews are hard living in Argentina but that is not the case, in fact a have a large part of the media and not a single jewish I know had any kind of problem (maybe some misplaced jokes, but that happens to everyone here). Sorry for adding these lines but I'm amazed at how many lies or distorted info about my country are said.

                      Thanks for reading,

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