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Harry The Nazi

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Kalessin
    Originally posted by AndroMan
    It will still be possible to hunt with hounds using (fox free) dragged scented rags, 'drag hunts'.
    At the moment, the hunt is a functional entertainment - with drag-hunts, it would become pure entertainment. And don't go on about cruelty - fishing is just as cruel as hunting, if not more so.
    The true function of foxhunting is not pest control. It is as a rather anachronistic and symbolic enactment of the feudal relationship between the landowners and their serfs, some of whom even relish their 'running with the hounds'.

    The fate of the fox is a warning to all who would contemplate disobedience, poaching, or a release from their ancient serfdom.

    From the hunting pink of the riding uniform, to the bloody initiation, foxhunting is about as relevant to modern agriculture as the antic antics portrayed in The Wicker Man.

    ...

    Fishing may be cruel, but it's a lot more democratic. Fishing tackle is also a lot easier to come by and requires little in the way of stabling, steadings, or kennels.

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    • #62
      I could give a long and ranting post on why I disagree with your analysis of hunting - but you'd just reply with more of the same.

      Shall we just agree to disagree on this?
      Arma virumque cano.

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      • #63
        he true function of foxhunting is not pest control. It is as a rather anachronistic and symbolic enactment of the feudal relationship between the landowners and their serfs, some of whom even relish their 'running with the hounds'.

        The fate of the fox is a warning to all who would contemplate disobedience, poaching, or a release from their ancient serfdom.

        From the hunting pink of the riding uniform, to the bloody initiation, foxhunting is about as relevant to modern agriculture as the antic antics portrayed in The Wicker Man.
        Agreed - hunting as it is practiced by these people is NOT a means of controlling the fox population (much as the Countryside Alliance might say otherwise). There are better, cheaper, more efficient and more modern methods of pest control.

        Every aspect of the hunt is extremely ritualistic - the uniforms, horns, hounds, not to mention the roles ascribed to different hunt participants - are all part of a grotesque tradition that we are better off without. We don't practice badger baiting any longer,and cock-fighting is illegal - why is this different?

        I just don't see what all the fuss is about it - its such a minority issue to be concerned with. Though the countryside alliance would seemingly have us all believe banning hunting will bring about the collapse of the British economy... Far from it - if anything Thatcher and her cronies took care of that back in the 80's when they destroyed Britains manufacturing industry..
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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        • #64
          The mass hysteria surround Diana's death was a little surprising to me. Though what is more surprising perhaps is the popular view that she was 'bumped off'. Couldn't quite see that myself...

          I certainly think the media played a significant role in misrepresenting Diana. We had to hear time and time again about her charitable work, her 'landmine crusade'. By the time she came on the scene - most western governments had already signed up to a voluntary agreement to suspend the use of anti-personnel landmines... Her contribution was relatively small - except perhaps for bringing media attention to worthwhile causes...

          I don't know - from the interviews I've seen she always came across as quite small minded and self serving...
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • #65
            Yes. I was reminded by the follow-up piece in the Sun showing the royals visiting bombed ruins that popular feeling during the Blitz was at first that the royals were staying safely out of it. Only when they realised their popularity was taking a knocking did they start showing up
            for Blitz pix. There are some sources claim that the Germans deliberately held off bombing such places as Buckingham Palace, but I suspect that might not be the whole truth. Certainly I wasn't too pleased, as I've mentioned before, to discover that Churchill was misreporting the flying bomb hits to suggest that every time one hit South London (where there were few important factories and so on but where I lived) the Nazis would hear that they had hit an important industrial site. That explained why S. London got the most V-weapon hits. So it seems not only Hitler but also Churchill were conspiring to kill me...

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            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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            • #66
              Although a beneficial side-effect of this was that Croydon got the most doodle-bug strikes...(Joke). My Dad (b.1938) actually watched a V1 come down on Raynes Park from my Nan's house in Worcester Park (He watched it from there,I mean; she didn't launch it from her garden... :D ) . As it landed about an eighth of a mile short of the giant gasometers that stood next to my pater's residence (ah, luxury) he's really rather lucky to be here. As am I. In fact, I (like so many others of course) only exist thanks to Hitler: My maternal grandfather was married in 1935, and with his wife and two children was in a shelter in Vauxhall one night during the Blitz. His children were thirsty and asked him to get them water from the standpipe at the opposite end of the shelter. Whilst he was there, a bomb landed on them, and he was the sole survivor, owing to him being at the opposite end to the main impact. They found his wife's remains over a mile away. Dreadful. He remarried and my mum was the result (although he died when my ma was six, and my grandmother left my mother with an aunt in 1951. She (grannie) was never seen again). As a consequence of this dislocation, my mum ended up meeting my dad at a dance at the Streatham Locarno (! 8O ). Talk about chains of events....And all because they didn't let the little corporal into art-college!

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              • #67
                I too owe my existence to Hitler. My Mum was evacuated out from Portsmouth to the West Country to work in a munitions factory. There she met my Dad, when he gallantly asked her to dance as he saw she was discomfited by the attentions of a black GI. She was engaged to someone else at the time. So there was a bit of racism involved as well (not that my parents were particularly racist beyond what was the norm for their generation). It's funny how life moves on...
                \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                • #68
                  Streatham Locarno, eh ? I might have bumped into your parents! Not that I was much of a dancer, but there were a couple of good second hand bookshops nearby... :)

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
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                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                  • #69
                    Re: About what

                    Originally posted by Hans von Hammer
                    Even though he did all that and is a monster, there is no problem in dressing up like him, or composing a song praising the guy (British IRON MAIDEN - their debut album, i think.)
                    Slightly off topic, but as a Maiden fan I MUST clarify something: This song is an instrumental. No lyrics.

                    As to the original thread, in my opinion, I think Harry knew what he was doing. It was shocking and he wanted it that way. I don't think he did it because he's praising Hitler--just something to raise eyebrows amongst his friends. He has apologized, his father's probably raked his arse over the coals, and the public won't be happy until he gets himself to Auschwitz and sees it for himself. Anyway... I'm disappointed in his behavior and ... life will go on.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Alas, I don't think there are any bookshops at all in Streatham, now! (That was my post at the top of page!). In fact, I believe the Locarno is now 'Caesars' lap-dancing club! Oh, dear. I occassionally (very occassionally) used to do an emergency stint at a vet trauma centre on the groundfloor of 'The High' - a 1930's block of former luxury flats. Full of, er, professional ladies and severe addicts. Someone once broke into the practice by sledgehammering the wall through from the stairwell! (Result = آ£15 and some valium...). It's very sad - there's a dried-up swimming pool in the back courtyard and a lecture room and music room (still with a piano) for the residents' use, all derelict now. Full of ghosts...

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                      • #71
                        Wow, is that the block more or less across from the Locarno. I nearly bought a flat from the guy who ran the Locarno (same guy who started putting on Miss World, whose name you'd know if I could remember it) but realised in time that I didn't really want to settle South of the River (see earlier post) and wound up in Notting Hill. That place was considered one of the poshest blocks in Streatham, too., Seen in its day as a sort of American style luxury block. I think Berkley Grey, who lived a couple of streets up from me in Norbury, had his smooth detective Norman Conquest living there in the fifties, just to show how cool he was (he also drove an Aston Martin). Berkley Grey's real name was Edwy Searles Brooks, who wrote the St Franks stories in the Nelson Lee Library before WW2 and also wrote many Sexton Blake stories (many of which he turned into Conquest and/or Inspector Ironsides stories for the Collins Crime Club). One of the few who made a transition from the English pulps to the upmarket hardback crime novel. Nice bloke. I used to go to tea with him and his very pleasant wife. He actually drove a Humber himself, as I recall. His house was even posher than my Auntie Connie's, who lived a little further down the road from him and was considered the poshest member of our family. It did teach me, though, that you could be the finest writer in the world (as I considered him at the time) and if you were very lucky would get to live in a house a bit posher than my Auntie Connie's. It gave me a realistic idea about authorial success from an early age.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Must be the same block. Jings! Cities are such trans-temporal crucibles of coincidence and overlap. Well, London is anyway. You made the right decision to locate in Ladbroke Grove instead, I reckon. The residents of 'The High' are more likely to be Norman Crackhead these days. The name of the block is almost too appropriately funny for credulity. I remember reading a Berkley Grey story, but I can't remember if it was a Conquest one or not.
                          Actually, like Brixton and Camberwell, Streatham is quite on the 'up' again - there are some beautiful houses around the back streets, and the facades of much of the High Road itself are quite interesting - if you look up into the sky occassionally, a habit that Londoners seem incapable of. I actually 'lived' on Streatham Vale by accident for four months years ago - it was so bad I found Bolton attractive. Briefly (contrary to widespread belief, the salary of an 'assistant' vet imposes similar strictures on quality of housing to that of authorship :D )

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                          • #73
                            The Swastika.. yes... I like the way that symbol looks. And as we all know it stood for something else entirely, not Nazi ideology. And now i can't/won't wear a swastika t-shirt (Would look nice on a t-shirt) because of some vicious racist ideology. Hitler managed to only destroy german culture and other cultures.
                            All in just 12 years..

                            I even saw a reporter on swedish TV having to explain away a buddhist temple having a swastika in the background during an interview etc.. Weird and surreal in a way. Come On? Nazi-Buddhists? *R.O.F.L.*
                            :lol:

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Kipling used the reverse swastika, of course, on all his books. It was, if you like, his personal symbol. Sadly, with the rise of Hindu nationalism, the discovery of 'Vedic Science' and so on, the language of Nazism has somehow returned to India and is increasingly troubling. Pantheism used to be a considerably more attractive religious system than monotheism.
                              But I suppose that's another story. Again, context is the important word here. Context, context, context... The swastika has no sinister meaning pre-Hitler. When it continues to be taken up as the badge of racist Nazis in America and elsewhere, it has a considerably sinister meaning.

                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                              • #75
                                Funny you should mention those facades. As a young man I began to make it my business to look up, above the modern signs, and look at the city's architecture in order to get an idea of what it was originally intended to look like. I agree with you absolutely. Streatham owes a lot, I suspect, to the spread of influence of the arts and crafts movement.
                                When I was a lad it was reckoned as one of the posher parts of S. London, especially the bit north of St Leonard's.

                                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                                The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                                The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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