Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Was the War on Iraq Right?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    It reminds me much of the "feel" of the turmoil in Russia after WW1 as described in "Byzantium Endures". When the old order collapses: chaos reigning, no-one truly knows who the good guys are, quick brutal decisions (mostly fatal for those on the receiving end), elation, faked elation, fear, spys, volunteers seeking adventure, murder, tears, many clever "analytic" comments from abroad and - endless streams of refugees.
    Google ergo sum

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by L'Etranger View Post
      It reminds me much of the "feel" of the turmoil in Russia after WW1 as described in "Byzantium Endures".
      I think the author of mentioned novel also remarked somewhere that history has shown that violent revolutions tend to end up in regimes even more atrocious than the ones they set out to replace. I think that's an important observation, although I'm sure he didn't mean to say, along with some radical conservatives, that the same necessarily goes for peaceful evolution.
      "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Jagged View Post
        Originally posted by L'Etranger View Post
        It reminds me much of the "feel" of the turmoil in Russia after WW1 as described in "Byzantium Endures".
        I think the author of mentioned novel also remarked somewhere that history has shown that violent revolutions tend to end up in regimes even more atrocious than the ones they set out to replace. I think that's an important observation, although I'm sure he didn't mean to say, along with some radical conservatives, that the same necessarily goes for peaceful evolution.
        I've concluded that how you start out is important for how you end up. If you start out reaching first for the gun, you'll still be holding the gun at the end of the day; if you reach first for the pen, that's going to be still in your hand at the end of the day. (Though exceptions are necessarily the rule )

        Along with other observations, such as, when independence is won, the rivalries held in check by the external power will immediately go on the boil again. Post-independence will be an orgy of dividing the spoils, and things will naturally not go according to plan. This seems to be true of everywhere.
        sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

        Gold is the power of a man with a man
        And incense the power of man with God
        But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
        And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

        Nativity,
        by Peter Cape

        Comment

        Working...
        X