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American Democracy

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  • American Democracy

    In a previous thread...

    Originally posted by Foozle
    I just think that the world is focused on politics because the world got really screwy during the last four years - mostly because the U.S. is an immature democracy even though it has been the model for other democracies throughout the world. The U.S. culture is sort of the beta tester for democracy - you can find all the bugs in theory and practice within its version of democracy. And when I say immature, I mean the people too. We are currently obsessed with our fears (as Jerico constantly points out) and that is simply no way to confront the world. We aren't making rational or informed choices because we are behaving like scurrying ants after the anthill gets squashed.
    I did part of my degree in American Studies, and I got the impression that because The United States of America was such a (relatively) young "civilization", it had to go through the same amount of history as other countries, but in a much shorter space of time. If that makes any sense. The speed of development has always seemd much faster, and the US of A is often symbolically represented by a speeding car, or a fast-burning rocket, or something else very fast and shiny. I'm not sure I'd say "immature" as such, but there is often a sense of youthful zeal? "Intensity" appears to be my buzz word for today, and I think it can certainly be applied to America... it seems a very intense country... both in the positive strides it has made, and the negative ones.

    I don't mean to sound patronising, and I've never voiced this opinion in a lecture room, so it may be gibberish.
    "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

  • #2
    You have to keep in mind that America isn't really new as a civalization. Much of what the founding fathers created was based on British Common Law.

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    • #3
      Re: American Democracy

      Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
      In a previous thread...

      Originally posted by Foozle
      I just think that the world is focused on politics because the world got really screwy during the last four years - mostly because the U.S. is an immature democracy even though it has been the model for other democracies throughout the world. The U.S. culture is sort of the beta tester for democracy - you can find all the bugs in theory and practice within its version of democracy. And when I say immature, I mean the people too. We are currently obsessed with our fears (as Jerico constantly points out) and that is simply no way to confront the world. We aren't making rational or informed choices because we are behaving like scurrying ants after the anthill gets squashed.
      I did part of my degree in American Studies, and I got the impression that because The United States of America was such a (relatively) young "civilization", it had to go through the same amount of history as other countries, but in a much shorter space of time. If that makes any sense. The speed of development has always seemd much faster, and the US of A is often symbolically represented by a speeding car, or a fast-burning rocket, or something else very fast and shiny. I'm not sure I'd say "immature" as such, but there is often a sense of youthful zeal? "Intensity" appears to be my buzz word for today, and I think it can certainly be applied to America... it seems a very intense country... both in the positive strides it has made, and the negative ones.

      I don't mean to sound patronising, and I've never voiced this opinion in a lecture room, so it may be gibberish.
      I think you're pretty insightful.

      My take of the US changed the first time I went to Europe. You get a better perspective on your own culture when you see cities that have flourished for thousands of years. I think we've continually been in a hurry to catch up. However, there's no substitute for centuries of tradition and living. I think your idea of a "sense of youthful zeal" seems very appropriate, since the US, at times, must seem analogous to a 17 year old trying to fit in at the adult's table at a holiday.

      Of course, most 17 year olds don't have as much power as the US... :D

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      • #4
        America seems like a kid, whose been struck a good one, and is beating up the guy next to him. That is the impression of so many. Like a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde we've got a complex of smashing things and apologizing for it, sometimes. America will be fine if we can get a couple moderate humans who have interest in the people. We'll know we are better when our friends start coming around again.

        The Guardian had an Ohio State letter writing campaign. People from England and around the world began to send letters to registered voters and requested they vote for Kerry. The feedback from recipients was humorous or angry. Can anyone guess what the ratio was?

        HINT: The Guardian was forced to stop the project.
        The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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        • #5
          If I remember my history correctly... didn't Harry S. Truman win because people liked him. It's not the culture or the system that creates this issue it's the technology that has arisen since the founding fathers. There is a good reason why it's refered to as the idiot box.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Kitsune
            You have to keep in mind that America isn't really new as a civalization. Much of what the founding fathers created was based on British Common Law.
            ...which came from Roman law? we're all building our blocks on top of each other.

            America *is* new when compared to, let's say Japan or India or the UK. We should be learning from history... yet we're governed by rich white guys. :(

            i'm hoping Kerry gets elected, but i don't believe our problems will "evaporate" or correct themselves overnight. bear with us, peeps. we're still learning. *shrugs* :oops:

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