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Everyone Do the Castro Splash!!

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  • Everyone Do the Castro Splash!!

    Ok. To be honest, I hardly watched the Olympics. I'd probably enjoy the Special Olympics more. The point is I forgot what parameters they rate platform divers on. That said, I give Castro a 10 for execution, a 1 on form (maybe that's the desired score for falling on your face), and a 10 on degree of difficulty - I don't know about you, but I've stumbled a bit on an unexpected step downwards, but falling on my face and breaking my limbs? FUCK NO! What do you think I am? A degenerate retard Third World Country Dictator or something?

    I'm to lazy to find a link to the footage. So if you don't know what I'm talking about, too friggen bad, cuz it's funny as shit! :twisted:
    \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
    Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

  • #2
    Ok. The CNN is the best thing I could find doing a quick search...

    http://www5.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/ameri...1/castro.fall/

    I guess Karma really is a bitch!

    Old people often never recover from a nasty fall you know! ;)

    I wonder how many sneaky subtle steps will be built onto the next stage he has to speak from if he recovers? :twisted:
    \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
    Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, it won't be hard to imagine to how I voted since I am the only one so far.

      But dude! What have you got against Castro? Sure, he has too much power and he most likely has been corrupted by it - but have you seen our own U.S. President lately? I was stunned by the things Suskind was saying about Bush during a second term yesterday (on Charlie Rose - an SOB that doesn't post transcripts on his site!) - it will change the face of the U.S. probably for the rest of my lifetime (at which point I'd most likely move to another place). Bush during a second term is going to gut every decent social program we have in the U.S. I literally think the plan is to make us into a third world style labor force because so much infrastructure is already here, but the labor costs too much as it stands. Well, that's not my thinking, but me trying to figure out my opponents' motives.

      Once upon a time Castro and compatriots like Che Guevara must have been idealists out to improve the world. Many men follow that path and are corrupted by the resulting rewards of having risked so much - they become what they despised.

      In a way, I pity Castro too much to be happy at his misfortune. Then again, I am not precisely a supporter of his policies. Like I said, I think he has become his own enemy.

      You know what might be a good theatrical analogy? The third Godfather movie - the opera version. I think I enjoyed the broad dramatic strokes of the third film, even though everyone always pans it. Taken as a kind of Opera (and there are many hints that it is an opera), it's pretty good. It shows how power corrupts even the most noble of intents. Our hero is born into a life not of his choosing. At first he resists, he is the quintessential american - he goes to university and even to war for his country. But he is finally drawn into the family business and it's power structures. He tries to succeed at what he does but also to keep some part of his life pure from the corrupting influence of his business life. Of course, he fails utterly to keep his two closely linked worlds apart - they collide with tragic results. The image of our hero on the opera house steps at the end of #3 is a very moving scene and a strong caution about how one chooses to lead one's life.

      The Greeks say that a man's character is his destiny. You gotta watch for those character flaws - they'll get you every time.

      Comment


      • #4
        I haven't read your post yet, Foozle. I will, but I am just making humor out of someone else's misfortune. I saw the video clip a couple of times and couldn't help it!

        I suppose if it happened to Clinton, Bush or Kerry I'd do the same thing, but it would be even funnier! :twisted:
        \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
        Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been browsing the web a little trying to read up on Cuba and I found this:
          http://www.fiu.edu/~fcf/embargo.yes.82597.html

          My understanding about the reasons for US treatment of Castro is that American companies and investors had large amounts of money in Cuba and owned quite a bit of land. Castro took American property when he took over. Personally I'm not so sure the US embargo is a great idea, it basically creates a Scapegoat for Castro's failings; if the Cuban ecconomy isn't doing well, he can just blame it on the Embargo. However,, anyone who thinks that Castro is a good guy, needs to talk to Cuban exiles.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Kitsune
            Castro took American property when he took over.
            :x Oh dear, shock horror; isn't that terrible. You lost your offshore brothel. How dreadful of Cubans to want sovereignty over their own country. How repressive to provide an impoverished Third World Country with education and health care that is the envy of the world.

            Sorry - I don't normally indulge in sarcasm, but this thread is offensive. I too have met Cubans, who love their Revolution. I have Colombian, Chilean and Peruvian friends who feel likewise and hate and despise what US imperialism has done their Continent.

            Castro is one of the greatest human beings ever to have walked, and even if Bush or one of his successors ever succeeds in turning Cuba into another hell on earth, his example will never be forgotten :!:
            \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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            • #7
              I apologize for offending. My motives for making this thread are very superficial. Believe me, there was little or no consideration of who Castro is or what he has accomplished.
              All that I know, from my military backround, is that he in an "enemy."
              I'm doing my best to understand the entire world, despite that we Americans are indoctrinated into seeing from a very ethnocentric perspective.
              This forum is a great learning tool!
              My apologies.
              \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
              Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

              Comment


              • #8
                I realise that Peter Tatchell is hardly an unbiased source, but those of a curious nature might like to follow this link to his review of the film Before Night Falls, as published in the Guardian newspaper:

                http://www.guardian.co.uk/friday_rev...503116,00.html
                "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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                • #9
                  I don't favor any kind of intolerance, except that against intolerance. Clearly, Castro is a mixed blessing for Cuba. Really, it's a pity.

                  But yeah, I'm not going to shed many tears for the dictatorship he replaced. Sadly, the U.S. has continually supported dictators we considered "friendly." This has been going on for decades throught the world - and then we cry when it comes time for "blowback."

                  Oh you mean it's wrong to support dictators? What a shock!

                  BTW, this is precisely why we should move SO CAREFULLY and SO SLOWLY when it comes to playing international cop (and actually, I oppose it outright) - it's too hard to know what will become of presumed allies even 10-20 years hence. Maybe the degree to which we meddle in the affairs of others doesn't amuse them in quite the way we might have hoped. No good deed goes unpunished. Etc etc etc.

                  Getting back to movies (because that's what this thread is all about)...

                  Perhaps thematically people might also be interested in the film "Kiss of the Spiderwoman." What I like about that movie is the fact that everyone portrayed is a complicated mess. The cross-dressing man played by Hurt typifies many homosexuals I have known in terms of their extremely complicated social and political perspectives.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is a joke right? Your basically saying that a person who arrest political dissidents, and engages in torture and killing of anyone who disagrees with him is on the same level as Mother Teresa. I think my friend Fernando Alvarez and most of the Cuban exiles would beg to differ.

                    Originally posted by Mikey_C
                    Castro is one of the greatest human beings ever to have walked, and even if Bush or one of his successors ever succeeds in turning Cuba into another hell on earth, his example will never be forgotten :!:

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Viva Cuba!

                      Dear Kitsune, your Latin friends are obviously from the opposite end of the social spectrum to mine. Perhaps my post was a bit extreme, perhaps I'm not really a great one for hero-worship. Even Mother Theresa has her detractors!
                      http://www.secularhumanism.org/libra...hens_16_4.html

                      The Tatchell article was interesting (thanks, Duncan). The macho legacy is strong in the Carribean, but at least things seem to be changing for the better. However, I don't believe that torture is practised in Cuba (apart from on Guantanamo Bay), and it is my understanding that the "political dissidents" recently imprisoned were charged with receiving money from a hostile foreign source (ie the USA) to fund their activities. The laws concerning this were brought in as a direct response to the "Helms Burton Act" which means that the US can impose penalties on third party countries for even daring to trade with Cuba. I understand a Spanish airline has recently fallen foul of this. I think that a great many other states would not tolerate this level of foreign interference.

                      I accept that the Cuban system has some unattractive authoritarian features, but there is also a high level of popular political participation. For instance, when British trade unionists from the education sector visited Cuba, their Cuban peers found it incredible that our government would introduce new working practises without fully consulting the unions first.

                      Perhaps another way of looking at this situation would be to ask "What type of democracy is sustainable in Latin America, given the interference from the North?" Cuba offers one model; it probably isn't the only one; it probably isn't repeatable (being an island helps!) Perhaps if the electorate in the US could help by persuading their government to ease up on this part of the world.

                      If I were opposed to the Cuban government, I would agree with you, Kitsune, that the blockade in some ways actually strengthens its position. The blockade does provide a ready made excuse for everything that goes wrong in Cuba, and I would say that the island is gripped by an every day "siege mentality" which does provide a justification for repressive measures (Don't forget that when George Orwell wrote "1984", he wasn't just thinking of Stalinist Russia - he was drawing on his own experiences of life in wartime Britain).

                      However, even from a position sympathetic to the Revolution, I say "Drop the Blockade!" Give these people some air.

                      So at least we agree on one thing.... :)

                      PS Jerico - Apologies accepted!
                      \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think you need to rethink your beliefs on Castro and Cuba. Human Right's Watch has some rather scathing reports on Cuba's human right records... check out the last link on torture.
                        This report shows that Cuba's treatment of political prisoners in some cases rises to the level of torture, violating Cuba's obligations under the Convention against Torture and under the Universal Declaration.7 The convention bars torture and "acts of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment" and the Universal Declaration states that "no one shall be subjected to torture." 8 Cuba's imposition of prolonged periods of incommunicado pretrial and post-conviction detention, beatings, and prosecutions of previously-tried political prisoners—where those practices result in severe physical or psychological pain orsuffering—constitute torture under the convention.9 Cuba also has failed to comply with its obligations under the convention to "take effective legislative, administrative, judicial or other measures to prevent acts of torture in any territory under its jurisdiction" and to "ensure that all acts of torture are offenses under its criminal law."10


                        http://www.hrw.org/reports/1999/cuba/
                        http://www.hrw.org/press/2003/04/cuba041203.htm
                        http://www.hrw.org/reports/1999/cuba...htm#P521_65970[/quote]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Kitsune,

                          I think we may have to differ on Cuba. Human Rights Watch is not an organisation which has my full confidence, neither has its founder, George Soros: http://www.newstatesman.com/site.php...N=200306020019

                          No doubt we could argue about this and related matters until the proverbial cows come home (or until Berry locks the thread, more likely!), but what iinterests me is that there are two contradictory thoughts in my head:

                          1. Terrorism is Terrorism
                          2. One person's terrorist is another person's freedom fighter.

                          I am not sure where this leads me. My mother, the gentlest person in the world, made bombs during WW2 to drop on German cities. Surely that was terrorism: the people being killed weren't combatants. But I don't attribute any blame to her, just gratitude that her generation stopped Hitler.

                          Somehow the world has lost its moral bearings (if it ever had any), which is why the politicians sound like hypocrites, and so, no doubt, do we... :(
                          I think this is why we need the work artists like Mr Moorcock. A purely "political" view of the world turns you a little inhuman.
                          \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                          • #14
                            I have one question for you Mikey. Do you actually know anyone who escaped from Cuba?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I know people who have escaped from Chile under Pinochet and Colombia under the present "democratic" president - but Cuba, no. I know plenty have people who have visited. We've had an invitation from someone who lives there - a member of the son band Asere http://www.astarmusic.co.uk/aserebiog.html, so if we ever get organised to go I shall give you all some feedback.

                              Me, I'm looking to escape from Britain right now... Give me SUN 8)

                              (Go on - you can have the last word on Cuba if you must!)
                              \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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