Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Draft to the Libyan embassy in Ottawa

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Draft to the Libyan embassy in Ottawa

    Draft message to the Libyan embassy in Ottawa, intended to help Canadians pass along the message:

    The government of Libya is engaging in acts of murderous violence against its own population. It no longer has the moral legitimation to govern. We urge that you end your association with this regime, and follow the lead of the ambassadors to the Arab League, to Bangladesh, the European Union and Belgium, India, Indonesia, Poland and others. Take the opportunity to dissociate yourself and be remembered among those who were loyal to the Libyan people, rather than to the Qaddafi regime.

    E-mail: [email protected]
    Phone: 613 230 0919
    Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

  • #2
    Hat's off to your activism there DP!

    Comment


    • #3
      Lev Lafeyette composed the original, so, I give him credit. We were discussing that I was having a problem with composing a clear, effective message, ultimately me not liking what I really sent. He put something together for any country with a Libyan embassy that hasn't said or done something yet, and now it's a publicly available message.
      Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

      Comment


      • #4
        If you don't mind, Dylar, I'm going to share this on my crackbook page.

        Edit --- Damn, too big for a crackbook post.

        Edit Too --- Posted it as a note. Learn something new every day. Way to go, Dylar.
        Last edited by Wanderlust; 02-22-2011, 06:30 AM.
        Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it.

        ~Henry David Thoreau

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks WL, I thought you would appreciate this snippet I got off the CBC website:

          "Meanwhile, CBC News has learned that Ihab Nuri El-Mismari, counsellor at the Libyan embassy in Ottawa, has resigned because he could not agree with what his government is doing in Libya."

          Found at the bottom of this article:

          http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/...tin-libya.html

          Thanks for helping to make this happen. He might well have done this anyway, but the messages must have meant something in the end.
          Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

          Comment


          • #6
            A few of my old mateys on crackbook signed-up, but not near as many as I'd hoped. Unfortunately apathy is alive and well in Canada. And like you say, he might've done so anyway, but why not help things along?
            Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it.

            ~Henry David Thoreau

            Comment


            • #7
              I wonder if anyone's still holding out at the embassy. So many have declared their allegiance to the anti-Gaddafi league.
              What I would hope for is - while the "West" is too sissie-ish (once again) to support the rebellion we should at least drop food, medicine and other supplies, because they are not only out-gunned but under-supplied there....
              Google ergo sum

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by L'Etranger View Post
                while the "West" is too sissie-ish (once again) to support the rebellion
                Well, at least Obama voiced his support for the Egyptian people, something that can't have been completely uncomplicated. Boy, am I glad Bush is still not at the oar in this situation which is, quite frankly, the most interesting and exciting situation in international politics since... well, further back than 9/11 if you'll excuse me... at least since the fall of the Berlin wall.

                I just hope that the newly-freed North-African states will get what their people have fought so hard to get, and lost so much to get. Let's face it, while Mubarak had some streaks of a civilized person in him, Gadaffi is much less lenient. The revolution against Gadaffi is much bloodier.

                So, what're WE doing here in the West? We could get our shit together to go directly into the middle of the Arabian countries when our oil supplies were threatened, but when it's "JUST" about human rights and such, we stand by and comment here and there...

                If you ask me, it's a bloody shame we didn't save our forces from Afghanistan and Iraq, so that we could offer them for help of Libya who could really use them now.
                "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Love the last line quote. All of us left liberal democrats now face the anarchist dilemma. We oppose the death penalty, but are happy to see summary justice ( la Clinton leaps for joy at Colonel G ' s death).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by spaceroquer View Post
                    Love the last line quote. All of us left liberal democrats now face the anarchist dilemma. We oppose the death penalty, but are happy to see summary justice ( la Clinton leaps for joy at Colonel G ' s death).
                    I don't think anarchism necessarily implies complete pacifism. Actually, historically, anarchists have employed a lot of violence. That's where you got the bourgeoisie's classic anarchist stereotype of a madhatter dressed in black and carrying a round black bomb with a lit fuse.

                    In my personal ethics, violence is a means of last resort. I know that mr. George W. Bush, when he was president, said much the same thing, but either he was just parrotting phrases that he was advice by spin doctors to be opportune, or he has a very different idea from me of where to draw the line to last resorts.

                    When Bush & Co. went into Iraq, it was on a feeble excuse of Hussein certainly having mass destruction weapons which he intended to use unscrupulously. We now all know that this was a false claim, based on tenuous and largely unresearched claims of a single individual. Whether it was done on a basis of bad intent or just plain paranoia is not central here; what's important is that when you finally do resort to violence, you'd better check and double-check that your premises are right.

                    Libya is a far cry from Iraq. The people of Libya was screaming for help against an opressor. Western forces went in reluctantly and with much careful consideration, not flinging a lasso and screaming loudly about being on a "crusade" (a term, understandably, with many bad connotations among Arab populations), but with restraint and reluctance.

                    The Libyan people has suffered under Gadaffi's dictatorship for over 40 years, and they -- unlike the Iraqis that Bush seemed to expect to spread palm leaves on his way and cheer his large-scale John Wayne impersonation -- actually asked, begged, and implored for help in a desperate situation.

                    To draw a loose parallel (the workings of large-scale politics, after all, are somewhat different that personal relationships), we could look at a local killing. Killing somebody for some personal monetarian gain, or for dislike or something, is murder and correctly generally condemned. Killing somebody as a last defense of of the life of oneself or loved ones is, if regrettable, forgiveable.
                    Last edited by Jagged; 11-02-2011, 10:08 AM. Reason: Oops!
                    "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X