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LEtranger--help please with my studies

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  • spaced_moorcock
    replied
    Thanks Carter Kaplan and MANinBLONDwig! I'll have a Google later for some more information.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Zomby Woof

    Three hunderd years ago
    Thought I might get some sleep
    Stretched myself out onna antique bed
    An' my spirit did a midnight creep

    You know I'll never sleep no more

    To me it seem that is just ain't wise

    Didja ever wake up in the mornin'
    With a ZOMBY WOOF behind your eyes

    I am the ZOMBY WOOF
    I'm the creature all the ladies been
    Talkin' about

    I am the ZOMBY WOOF
    They all seek for shelter when I come chargin' out
    Here I'm is, the ZOMBY WOOF

    Tellin' you all the Zomby troof
    Here I'm is...

    Reety-awrighty, he da ZOMBY WOOF
    Reety-awrighty, he da ZOMBY WOOF

    The said aw-reety
    An' they was aw-righty
    An' I was a Zomby for you, little lady...

    I got a great big pointed fang
    Which is my Zomby Toof
    My right foot is bigger than my other one is
    Like a reg'lar Zomby Hoof
    If I raid your dormitorium
    Don't try to remain aloof...

    I might snatch you up screamin' through the window all nekkid
    An' do it to you on the roof, don't mess with the
    ZOMBY WOOF

    I am about as evil as a Boogie Man can be!

    Tellin' you all the Zomby Troof
    Here I'm is, the ZOMBY WOOF

    Tellin' you all the Zomby Troof
    Here I'm is, the ZOMBY WOOF

    Leave a comment:


  • nalpak retrac
    replied
    Thanks AndroMan for the response and leads.

    Spaced Moorcock: Zero is a remarkable fellow. His story is treated in part by the band Gong in their album You. If you google up the lyrics I belive you will find them instructive. Zero himsel is a direct reciprocal of what I take for a zombie, which might have to do with his highly-tuned (I almost wrote "highly-strung") capacity for recognizing zombies and weaving together a yarn that exposes their warp and woof.

    You might also google the lyris to Zappa's "Zombie Woof", which certainly underscores the question as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Re: LEtranger--help please with my studies

    Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
    LEtranger and friends:

    I am afraid my German is not what it should be. I am looking into the Volksbuch, particularly tales it contains concerning Faust. All things Faust can be found here:

    http://www.ucalgary.ca/~esleben/faus...ronologie.html

    Now, my query has to do especailly with the Volksbuch published in 1587 (English translation 1592, and what is clearly an antecedent to Marlowe's play.) Question: who was the author of the Volksbuch, and, in regards to Faust, does he perhaps have in mind not only the legends of some German magician(s) named Faust, but could he also be reacting to an Italian "Socian" theologian, Faustus Socinus, who was living and writing at that time (1539-1604)?

    Socinus, as every schoolboy knows, denied the divinity of Christ and the claim that immortality was inherent to Man's nature. He was the direct father of the Unitarians, and exerted an influence on the Dutch Arminians (and thus on English Christian Independents/Early-Moderns such as Milton, Locke, Jonathan Mayhew, and Jefferson.)

    Might the inclusion of the Faust story in the Volksbuch reflect Reformation politics? Is the Volksbuch author (perhaps in an effort to defend the Augustinian orthodoxy) alluding to Socinus?

    Um, sort of a story challenge, too, if you like, people....
    It's not so much the Volksbuch, as a volksbuch (chapbook). In this case a piece of popular literature, 'Historia von Johann D. Fausten/Dem weitbeschreyten Zauberer und Schwartzkأ¼nstler'. The author was the very prolific, A. Nonymous and it was published in Frankfurt am Main by J. Spies, in 1587. It's supposed to be about a historical Dr John Faustus, who lived around 1480-1540 and it's a collection of tales, anecdotes and travelogue, similiar to the sort of thing that was circulated about Roger Bacon & Friar Bungay, Albertus Magnus, Michael Scott and the slightly more pagan Robin Goodfellow. Doctor Faustus was a more contemporary figure, clearly influenced by the Reformation and the new spirit of secular alchemical/neoPlatonical/humanistic and proto-scientific inquiry. They were all 'Dr Strange' style superheroes, or 'Mask' like Trickster figures, for their day.

    That is a very interesting theory, about 'Faustus Socinus'. The chapbook might yet turn out to be a sly piece of 'papist' counter-Reformation satire and black propaganda. But, some people did enjoy an exciting yarn, with more than the slight reek of sulphur and brimstone. Marlowe, in his play, 'Doctor Faustus' (first performed around 1594), does seem to have been attacking a strong humanist and even pagan spirit in Elizabethan society. Dr John Dee, and Spencer's 'The Faerie Queene', may have been targets.

    The book was translated into English by P.F. Gent as, 'The Historie of the Damnable Life and Deserved Death of Doctor John Faustus', published by Thomas Orwin, London, 1592. This became the basis for Marlowe's work.
    Online version: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin...c=1999.03.0001

    Basically, Faustus plays tricks and travels about a lot with Mephistopheles, becomes invisible and teases the Pope. These sorts of folktales, or 'mأ¤rchen' were very popular reading matter at the time, thanks to the explosion of printing around Northern Europe and the expansion of secular learning.

    I don't know if that's much help.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust
    http://www.tabula-rasa.info/DarkAges/Faust.html
    http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/faust.html
    http://www.themystica.com/mystica/articles/f/faust.html

    Leave a comment:


  • spaced_moorcock
    replied
    I have no idea what is goin on in this thread (sorry, I'm a little tired tonight and I've spent the past few hours catching up in Q&A so I've not had time to readi t properly) but I loved the way it started out with a question, only to be disrupted by an attack of zombies. Pure Genius in my current state. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    When you hold that Chair, are you growing your hippie hair and playing guitar again? :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • nalpak retrac
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc

    Carter will now be teaching my theory classes... He seems to be far more eloquent than I. :D
    Alas, I think I was too eloquent in my criticisms of postmodernism, cultural relativism, and culture studies back there in grad school, but at the same time I had golden hippie hair, played guitar like an angel, was cute in my bright blue jeans, and I had spent a year teaching in The Bronx--I had actually been to the laboratory of diversity they claimed to be so expert about--so they showed me mercy--they tucked me away safely in a hidden technical college where I would be unable to corrupt the children of the neo-liberal bourgeois. "Send Kaplan to live amongst the proles!" I seem to hear them say. Ah, but when I publish my many book-length manuscripts they will not be able to ignore me, and I will be advanced to that literature chair in the sky, and students from the four corners of the globe will sit at my feet to hear me sing (in ottva rima strains) of Grotius, Arminius and the beneficent splendor of Netherlandisch early modernism!

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Carter Kaplan


    Azariel: Far be it from me to speak for Zero, but I would venture to suggest the figure of Van Gogh is a monkey wrench in the Frankfurt school's anti-modernist program. Moreover, there is the fact that one of Van Gogh's decendents, a film maker, was recently murdered by religious extremists who, like the Franfurt school, also harbor resentment toward the enlightenment, and the western European culture of reason, liberty and free expression, which first emerged in fact in the Netherlands (see Arminius and Grotius), and was transplanted to England and America. Zero's piece might be regarded as a satire of post-modernism; i.e. the post-modernists are so-wacked out on theory and first principles, that Van Gogh is rejected as a degenerate modernist.
    Carter will now be teaching my theory classes... He seems to be far more eloquent than I. :D

    Leave a comment:


  • nalpak retrac
    replied
    LEtranger:

    Thanks. The 16th century was of course a crazy time for religion, and I am wondering how politics might have influenced the Volksbuch editor/author as he assembled the work.


    Azariel: Far be it from me to speak for Zero, but I would venture to suggest the figure of Van Gogh is a monkey wrench in the Frankfurt school's anti-modernist program. Moreover, there is the fact that one of Van Gogh's decendents, a film maker, was recently murdered by religious extremists who, like the Franfurt school, also harbor resentment toward the enlightenment, and the western European culture of reason, liberty and free expression, which first emerged in fact in the Netherlands (see Arminius and Grotius), and was transplanted to England and America. Zero's piece might be regarded as a satire of post-modernism; i.e. the post-modernists are so-wacked out on theory and first principles, that Van Gogh is rejected as a degenerate modernist.

    Zero: You took up the story challenge quite well. A sound and sober academic inquiry became the point of departure for a zany, energetic piece in your hands. Your energy, in fact, is rather suggestive of Van Gogh's brush strokes.

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    Re: LEtranger--help please with my studies

    Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
    LEtranger and friends:

    I am afraid my German is not what it should be. I am looking into the Volksbuch, particularly tales it contains concerning Faust. All things Faust can be found here:

    http://www.ucalgary.ca/~esleben/faus...ronologie.html

    Now, my query has to do especailly with the Volksbuch published in 1587 (English translation 1592, and what is clearly an antecedent to Marlowe's play.) Question: who was the author of the Volksbuch, and, in regards to Faust, does he perhaps have in mind not only the legends of some German magician(s) named Faust, but could he also be reacting to an Italian "Socian" theologian, Faustus Socinus, who was living and writing at that time (1539-1604)?

    Socinus, as every schoolboy knows, denied the divinity of Christ and the claim that immortality was inherent to Man's nature. He was the direct father of the Unitarians, and exerted an influence on the Dutch Arminians (and thus on English Christian Independents/Early-Moderns such as Milton, Locke, Jonathan Mayhew, and Jefferson.)

    Might the inclusion of the Faust story in the Volksbuch reflect Reformation politics? Is the Volksbuch author (perhaps in an effort to defend the Augustinian orthodoxy) alluding to Socinus?

    Um, sort of a story challenge, too, if you like, people....
    Carter, I don't know this ex tempore. I might be able to find out somethأ­ng before I travel for a few days from tonight on. Can't promise though, not my firmest terrain, so to speak. The knowledge of certain member of this forum who is in exile, to my repeated regret, would be helpful here, I'm sure.

    And, Zero-Hero, thanks for ze beautiful paintings, pictures and texts. Maybe what you are saying is already an answer, the acceptance, however, is sort of mixed. If you have too many energies why not try a workout shop, or if you intend to raise your number of postings to become an EC by posting frantically one after the other, like other people have done, then you're waisting your time as long as you do it in the "guest status".

    Leave a comment:


  • Azariel
    replied
    Whats the point of this thread?



    P.S. Stary Night is among one of my favorite paintings, not crap :D

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    PURE CRAP!

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    WANTED!




    FOR ACTING LIKE SOME FOLLOWER OF THE SIXTEENTH-CENTURY THEOLOGIAN FAUSTUS SOCINUS, AND MOREOVER INFORMED WITH MANDATES FORMULATED BY MODERNIST RENEGADES LIKE JACOBUS ARMINIUS, JOHN MILTON, JOHN LOCKE, AND THOMAS JEFFERSON[/img]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    WANTED!




    FOR REPRESNETING MODERNIST COUNTER-REVOLUTIONARY TENDENCIES IN THE PUBLIC PORTRAYAL OF BEING AN ARTIST WHO THINKS HE CAN PAINT WHAT THE FUCK HE WANTS WITHOUT SOME BASTARD TELLING HIM WHAT TO DO

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