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art submissions - px - discussion

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  • art submissions - px - discussion

    Ah, no rest for the weary! :lol:

    *PWV grabs his sketchbook and purple crayon*
    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

  • #2
    You're not required to do it if you don't feel up to it!

    I'm hoping we'll see something (or a collection of "somethings") that'll really kick peoples' imaginations into high gear. I've always been a fan of visionary landscape, if done well.

    LSN

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    • #3
      By the way, don't restrict your imagination to what is churned out by "fantasy artists."

      There are lots of traditional western painters who would fit into this category. Corot's landscapes, for instance.

      LSN

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      • #4
        Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
        You're not required to do it if you don't feel up to it!
        That's like telling a hammerhead he doesn't have to eat that wounded baby seal if he's not particularly hungry. :P

        Here's a question: what artists do people like when it comes to visionary landscapes? Help us get the juices flowing a bit. I've always liked Rodney Matthews.
        "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
        --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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        • #5
          Watteau. Cأ©zanne. Delacroix. I already mentioned Corot. Some of the people in the Hudson River School. Kaspar David Friedrich, sometimes.

          I should ask my wife for a quick suggestion or two: she's an MFA in painting and (also) in art history. Her instincts about such things tend to be good.

          LSN

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          • #6
            We've got a lot of talented artists, here. Dee and PWV everyone knows about, and there's also TM and pinkgreen, of course. ElysionGear is another, and mordenkainen and Ant and Etive have done interesting work as well.

            If we have a goodly # of submissions in this category, perhaps we can get a full-page illustration for the best n landscapes, and the best n stories that use those landscapes. This is really Perdix's call, since it's his magazine, but if we come up with something good, he'll likely be receptive.

            LSN (who unfortunately has no artistic talent, but loves great painting)

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            • #7
              Not painting, but drawing: Piranesi.

              Bizarre but sometimes intriguing (and sometimes cheap): Dali.

              LSN

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              • #8
                Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
                We've got a lot of talented artists, here. Dee and PWV everyone knows about, and there's also TM and pinkgreen, of course. ElysionGear is another, and mordenkainen and Ant and Etive have done interesting work as well.
                And Bakkhios. Man, his Elrics in the Image Gallery totally rock.
                "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ah, yes, our artist belge, right? More interesting work, indeed.

                  Just because I omitted a name doesn't mean I disapprove. In truth, there are so many artist-contributers to this site, that the probability of leaving someone out is high.

                  The challenge is open to anyone who wants to give it a try.

                  LSN

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                  • #10
                    I asked my wife, and she dumped a lot of names on me, many of which I recognized with the remark, "Oh, yes, I should have mentioned him." A few more names, then...

                    - Thomas Cole
                    - Albert Bierstadt
                    - Turner
                    - Constable
                    - Marsden Hartley
                    - Camille Pissarro

                    LSN

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                    • #11
                      I'd like some nice Dureresque pieces.

                      Actually, PWV, if the hammerhead, Sphyrna zygaena*, were indeed not hungry, it is reasonably likely that it would not prehend the compromised juvenile Hydrurga leptonyx (this being one of the more likely pinniped prey this shark might encounter). Appetite in the elasmobranchs is, as with many vertebrates, linked to gastric distension and presence of food in the stomach, and hence to gastric emptying time, which is regulated by numerous factors including digestibility of the preceding meal; ambient temperature (although note that the laminid sharks can locally increase the temperature of the gut by a plexus of counter-current rete mirabille blood vessels); stress; previous feeding behaviours. The neuronal and endocrine control of distal enteric motility ultimately determines voiding rate. Hence, the return of appetite (which is likely to be signalled to the central nervous system via a combination of autonomic afferents and possibly an hormonal ghrelin analogue) is largely independent of the presence or otherwise of suitable prey, although note that Sphyrna is known to be highly unpredictable, and may well attack prey wihout ingestion, merely as a patterned behavioural reflex. There is little data as to whether sharks generally take suggestions from primate advisors or observers, or whether they are very pig-headed and just go off on their own sweet way, doing their own thing with very little consideration for anyone else. The fact that they are all suspected to speak a form of Gaellic has so far limited studies (see McBugger, L & O'Toole, P.A., 1979: Chatting to Carcharinus: the receptivity of the Great White to subtle hints and suggestions regarding diet . Jour. Arch. Paddy. Rub. Sci.24: 212-17. Ladybird, Dublin.)

                      *I am assuming the Smooth Hammerhead is referred to, given the coastal distribution and hence the likelihood of this being the species encountered, as opposed to the seven other hammerhead sp.

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                      • #12
                        I thought "Hell" Breughel or Heironymous Bosch were more your sort of thing, Perdix. Is there in fact a Bosch illustration that illustrates the rate of voiding (via endocrine or neuronal control, or perhaps by the concentration of mucillage in the diet of his last victim) of the smooth hammerhead?

                        LSN

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                        • #13
                          No, but there is a nice contemporary Hirst installation of same :lol:

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                          • #14
                            The shop up the road opposite Hampton Court Palace has started selling very high-quality 'figures' (sculptures, really) of six-inch tall (ish) 'characters from Bosch'.

                            Hmm. I don't think the Mrs. would approve.

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                            • #15
                              nobody mentioned my dear William Blake's watercolors? or engravings? *siiiiigh....*

                              http://www.blakearchive.org/cgi-bin/...SearchPage;cv=

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