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  • #91
    a - tale
    b - impose
    a -
    b -

    c - Grey Mouser
    d - loss
    c -
    d -

    e -
    f -
    e -
    f -

    g -
    g -

    Comment


    • #92
      Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
      Excuse my Polonius-like ramblings. You're one of my favorite posters on MWM, and you seem to be at that age where you're questioning yourself a lot. I remember it well from personal experience. It makes me feel indulgent.
      There's nothing to "excuse". I very much appreciate your kind words, and you've given me a lot to chew over. I doubt the good people of Oxford share your sentiments, but I appreciate the thought. If nothing else, I need to find a town with a half decent "art-house" cinema... ooh, and art students... and goths... sorry, I've drifted from the "intellectual" pursuit into slightly baser territory, but what greater motivation can there be for self-improvement than the possibility of impressing someone cute in a coffee shop?

      Seriously though, I've always had a problem seeing past the immediate present. To use a Moorcock analogy, it's as if I'm stood at the edge of the world, and all that lies before me is swirling Chaos. It's hard to discern where the path I'm walking will lead. The fog of life? Something like that. I'm sure everyone feels that way. I have this unfortunate habit of reading biographies of people who seemed to know where they were heading in life as soon as they hit puberty, and it's hard not to compare myself unfavourably to such driven types.

      Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to look "Polonius" up...

      Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
      You studied poetry at school -- is Hopkins not much studied these days? In undergraduate school, I had him rammed down my throat, as it were. That was long ago, of course.
      I'm afraid the name didn't ring a bell. I actually studied poetry at university, but it was part of my American Studies degree, so I concentrated on the Beats really. I can't really remember being exposed to much poetry before that, although I did study a little Shakespeare and Wilde in Drama classes. Sorry.
      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

      Comment


      • #93
        Dee,

        I'll save you the trouble: Polonius is the irritating father of Hamlet's object of affection,
        Ophelia. Polonius is fond of giving tedious advice -- and he's not exactly a moral exemplar.
        It was a cheap literary allusion, something that comes too easily to me. (I should admit
        that I'm a genuine enthusiast for certain of Shakespeare's plays, as my close friends
        know only too well. )

        Of course, I'm far superior to Polonius from a moral standpoint. Trust me in all
        things. :twisted: :lol:
        --

        No apologies necessary for a lack of familiarity with Hopkins' work. After I wrote
        that posting, his work was on my mind for a while. I mentioned him to one of the
        friends with whom I indulge in versifying, and he looked horrified. "Hopkins!"
        he said with a sneer. "He was so full of religious sh*t that he's practically radioactive!"

        I smiled. The metaphor was a bit mixed, but it would be difficult to sum up the
        late Mr. Hopkins' deficiencies more cogently. Radioactive, indeed. :lol: Having
        imbibed so much Catholicism at an early age, I find that like Mithridates, to some
        degree I'm immune.

        --
        Concerning people having a sense of direction and drivenness in life, I suspect
        you'd be surprised if you took a poll on this site, or anywhere. Part of the education
        process (not limited to university) is to discover something that seems our true
        vocation. People often go to university, work for a while, drift, then find it.
        Once you know what you want to do, you've got to take the next step. That's
        the hardest part. It's so easy to take the path of least resistance.

        Doc, who is a professional academic, could probably comment on this. Mikey_C,
        who appears to have returned to university, might be another.

        As for your life-affirming urges with respect to nubile young ladies and
        coffee shops, that's simply because you're normal.

        LSN

        Comment


        • #94
          Of course Dee gets big bonus points from me for being a fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. That's 'a business class ticket to cool with xtra mojo after take off' :P

          And LSN gets big bonus points for being a fan of Shakespeare. 'That he is mad 'tis true, 'tis true 'tis pity, and pity 'tis 'tis true.' :)

          a - tale
          b - impose
          a -
          b -

          c - redeem
          d - loss
          c -
          d -

          e -
          f -
          e -
          f -

          g -
          g -

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by Grey Mouser
            Of course Dee gets big bonus points from me for being a fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. That's 'a business class ticket to cool with xtra mojo after take off' :P

            And LSN gets big bonus points for being a fan of Shakespeare. 'That he is mad 'tis true, 'tis true 'tis pity, and pity 'tis 'tis true.' :)
            That's the gravedigger speaking to Hamlet. Act IV, isn't it? You recall, no doubt,
            the whoreson tanner's claim to fame.

            Furthermore, I suspect you know what the gravedigger said was the reason for young
            Hamlet's being sent to England. Do you think 'tis true? :lol:



            a - tale
            b - impose
            a - fail
            b - Mikey_C

            c - redeem
            d - loss
            c - Grey Mouser
            d - Hawklord

            e - Mikey_C
            f - vernal
            e - Mikey_C
            f - sempiternal

            g - Grey Mouser
            g - HawkLord

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
              That's the gravedigger speaking to Hamlet. Act IV, isn't it?
              That's Polonius in act 2, discussing with the King and Queen why Hamlet is acting so wierd. I guess knowing that probably makes me a sad Shakespeare quoting fiend though. :roll:

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by Grey Mouser
                Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
                That's the gravedigger speaking to Hamlet. Act IV, isn't it?
                That's Polonius in act 2, discussing with the King and Queen why Hamlet is acting so wierd. I guess knowing that probably makes me a sad Shakespeare quoting fiend though. :roll:
                It's highly reminiscent of the Euphuistic diction that the gravedigger employed,
                also. Critics speculate that Shakespeare was making fun of the Euphuistic school,
                but he certainly used a lot of it in his plays. (Mostly earlier ones, e.g., Romeo
                and Juliet
                .) Hamlet is not devoid of the mannerisms of the school. It's
                one of the reasons it's speculated that the play was written (or rewritten) over
                a long period of time.

                I should check the text to verify which of the gravedigger's remarks
                reminded me of this quote.

                ---
                Here it is, from Act V, scene i:
                Originally posted by William Shaxpur
                HAMLET: I think it be thine, indeed; for thou liest in't.



                First Clown: You lie out on't, sir, and therefore it is not

                yours: for my part, I do not lie in't, and yet it is mine.


                HAMLET: 'Thou dost lie in't, to be in't and say it is thine:

                'tis for the dead, not for the quick; therefore thou liest.


                First Clown: 'Tis a quick lie, sir; 'twill away gain, from me to

                you.

                Later in the same scene, the sexton claims that Hamlet had
                gone mad "most strangely," "from losing his wits."

                Clearly, I conflated the circular diction with the comment
                about madness. Obviously, I need to reread the play again.

                LSN

                Comment


                • #98
                  And I'm off to hyperdictionary.com and Wikipedia to learn what is Euphuistic. :lol:

                  a - tale
                  b - impose
                  a - fail
                  b - Mikey_C

                  c - redeem
                  d - loss
                  c - esteem
                  d - Hawklord

                  e - Mikey_C
                  f - vernal
                  e - Mikey_C
                  f - sempiternal

                  g - show
                  g - HawkLord

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Originally posted by Grey Mouser
                    And I'm off to hyperdictionary.com and Wikipedia to learn what is Euphuistic. :lol: . . .
                    :? Sometimes you guys make me feel as if I'm writing a foreign language, whereupon
                    I go back to check whether I nodded off and typed a paragraph in French or
                    something. (I did this once in university, when I'd been up 24 hours before
                    an exam. To this day, I don't know what led my mind down that path -- languages
                    for me are like a selector-switch in the brain.) :?

                    I'm not being deliberately obscure, believe me. If I wanted to do that, I'd write
                    more about my specific area of expertise, and put everyone else to sleep.

                    LSN

                    Comment


                    • LSN your observation about the Euphuistic style was spot on:

                      Originally posted by Wikipedia
                      Euphuism is a mannered style of English prose, taking its name from works by John Lyly. Lyly's style influenced Shakespeare (Polonius in "Hamlet"; Moth in "Love's Labour's Lost"; Beatrice and Benedict in "Much Ado About Nothing").
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphuistic

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Grey Mouser
                        LSN your observation about the Euphuistic style was spot on:
                        . . .
                        What can I say? Misspent youth, and all that. Dee's notion of coffee-houses
                        and nubile young ladies sounds a better way to employ one's time at that
                        age. :lol:

                        LSN

                        Comment


                        • a - tale
                          b - impose
                          a - fail
                          b - oppose

                          c - redeem
                          d - loss
                          c - esteem
                          d - Hawklord

                          e - rain
                          f - vernal
                          e - pain
                          f - sempiternal

                          g - show
                          g - HawkLord
                          \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

                          Comment


                          • Now we await the last 2 words from HawkLord.

                            While we're waiting, I'll point out a technical feature of the
                            2 lines where I supplied the end-rhymes "vernal" and "sempiternal."
                            These are both unstressed on the last syllable, which, as I pointed out,
                            makes them "feminine" rhymes in English. (This is very different from
                            the rule in French. I wonder how the English rule was arrived at -- I'll
                            do some research on the question.)

                            When using a feminine rhyme-word, you're permitted to discard the final
                            unstressed syllable when analyzing the scansion of the line. This has the
                            practical result that these lines can have 11 syllables instead of 10.
                            To rehash, a pure iambic pentameter line with a feminine rhyme word
                            at the end will have the following syllable arrangement. (- is an
                            unstressed syllable; / is a stessed syllable.)

                            - / - / - / - / - / (-)

                            That ought to be clear enough; probably you already knew this.

                            LSN

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
                              No apologies necessary for a lack of familiarity with Hopkins' work. After I wrote that posting, his work was on my mind for a while. I mentioned him to one of the friends with whom I indulge in versifying, and he looked horrified. "Hopkins!" he said with a sneer. "He was so full of religious sh*t that he's practically radioactive!"
                              :lol: That's quite a harsh critique, I must say. I'm not sure how much faecal matter one needs to consume to become radioactive, but I imagine it's a pretty substantial amount.

                              Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
                              Part of the education process (not limited to university) is to discover something that seems our true vocation. People often go to university, work for a while, drift, then find it. Once you know what you want to do, you've got to take the next step. That's the hardest part. It's so easy to take the path of least resistance.
                              True. It's just hard to post on the Moorcock site without recalling how full of beans he was when it came to kicking his career off... and still finding time between writing great books to party with Lemmy and so forth. Damn him (in a very nice way).

                              Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
                              As for your life-affirming urges with respect to nubile young ladies and coffee shops, that's simply because you're normal.
                              I'm reading a memoir by a chap named Neville at the moment (Hippie Hippie Shake, if you're curious). He edited a contraversial magazine named OZ back in the 60s, and I'm being unduly influenced by his descriptions of the emerging coffee house scene. Lots of chaps in black polonecks reading Camus and pursuing women with heavy eye-liner and mugs of red wine.... sigh!

                              Originally posted by Grey Mouser
                              Of course Dee gets big bonus points from me for being a fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. That's 'a business class ticket to cool with xtra mojo after take off' [Razz]
                              Of course, I can't quote much Shakespeare, but I can spot a Buffy quote when I read one. That's from a scene in The Zeppo where Xander is asking Oz (Hey, synchronicity!) about being cool, and X says that being in a band is like a "business class ticket", etc. Am I right? Love that episode. The final scene is just genius...
                              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

                              Comment


                              • a - tale
                                b - impose
                                a - fail
                                b - oppose

                                c - redeem
                                d - loss
                                c - esteem
                                d - toss

                                e - rain
                                f - vernal
                                e - pain
                                f - sempiternal

                                g - show
                                g - throe

                                Comment

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