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An Adventure in Space and Time

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  • An Adventure in Space and Time

    An Adventure in Space and Time

    The BBC today announces that a special BBC TWO drama has been commissioned to mark the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who next year.

    An Adventure in Space and Time will tell the story of the genesis of Doctor Who since its first broadcast on 23 November 1963. Exploring all aspects of the longest running science fiction series to date, the special one off 90 minute drama will also look at the many personalities involved in bringing the series to life...

  • #2
    Doctor Who drama casts David Bradley as William Hartnell

    This looks like it could be an interesting 50th anniversary programme:

    Harry Potter actor David Bradley will play "first Doctor" William Hartnell in a BBC drama about Doctor Who's creation to mark its 50th anniversary.

    An Adventure in Space and Time will tell the story of the genesis of the BBC sci-fi drama in the early 1960s.

    Bradley, known to millions for his role as Filch in the Potter series, said he was "absolutely thrilled" to be cast.

    Call the Midwife actress Jessica Raine and Scotland's Brian Cox will also appear in the BBC Two commission.

    Cox will play Sydney Newman, the BBC head of drama credited with the creation of the show, while Raine will play the producer Verity Lambert.

    Filming will begin in February at BBC Television Centre, then move to Wimbledon Studios in south-west London.

    The script has been written by Mark Gatiss, a regular Doctor Who writer who, like Bradley, has been seen in the show since its 2005 revival.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-21251726
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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    • #3
      I said it could be interesting but in the end An Adventure in Space and Time was fantastic. Not just a period recreation of the origin of Doctor Who but also a deeply affectionate and touching portrait of William Hartnell, the original "Doctor Who", wonderfully depicted by David Bradley whose performance surely merits a BAFTA next year or there's no justice.*

      Mark Gatiss' script was wonderfully crafted and filled with fantastic homages, not merely reconstructions of classic TV moments like the Doctor's farewell to Susan or 'echoes' of future of the parent show, such as the Fifth Doctor's 'Braveheart [Tegan]' but also nods to the 'alternate' history of Doctor Who opening as it did with a fog-enshrouded Police Box on Barnes Common. As Bradley's Hartnell faced up to the fact that actually you could have Doctor Who without "Doctor Who" his nod to David Tennant's parting words when he regenerated - "I don't want to go." - had me in tears. In a year when there's been a number of really excellent TV dramas An Adventure in Space and Time
      stands head and shoulders above them all. But perhaps I'm a little biased.

      *I suspect strongly that there's no justice.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

      Comment


      • #4
        It was amazing, Bradley performance superb, I almost forgot I was watching a programme about Dr Who rather one about some one who had loved and loss a part. The credits had the end were great as well.
        Papa was a Rolling Stone......

        Comment


        • #5
          I felt like I was there. Not often I've been able to say that about a programme. Some nice touches of authenticity. The recreation of the TARDIS interior was brilliant, The use of the original cameras and monitors, really gave a sense of what it was like, watching the flickering 'high definition' 405 line b&w picture, back when I was a four year old.

          Stellar performances, fairly accurate clothing and make up. There were times, a glance, a camera angle, a gesture, when the character portrayed seemed to emerge from the actor and there was a true sense of the uncanny.

          Excellent stuff, authentically moving. Did the Hartnell years justice and I was there to watch them.

          Comment


          • #6
            #savetheday

            For those getting into the groove.

            My local cinemas are reporting sell-outs for tomorrow so the media onslaught seems to have paid off.
            Personally, I'm enjoying listening to the radio 4 dramas again.

            Comment


            • #7
              Mark Gatiss on making, An Adventure in Space and Time:

              http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-ra...ace-time-video

              I really hope that he gets the chance to take over from Moffat at some point.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                I said it could be interesting but in the end An Adventure in Space and Time was fantastic. Not just a period recreation of the origin of Doctor Who but also a deeply affectionate and touching portrait of William Hartnell, the original "Doctor Who", wonderfully depicted by David Bradley whose performance surely merits a BAFTA next year or there's no justice.*
                David, you ain't kidding.

                .....As Bradley's Hartnell faced up to the fact that actually you could have Doctor Who without "Doctor Who" his nod to David Tennant's parting words when he regenerated - "I don't want to go." - had me in tears. In a year when there's been a number of really excellent TV dramas An Adventure in Space and Time
                stands head and shoulders above them all. But perhaps I'm a little biased.
                .........
                That was amazingly good.

                Tomorrow, I'll see if I can find Day of the Doctor.

                "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                - Michael Moorcock

                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree. My wife (a border-line fan who boycotted the third series just because Martha wasn't Rose) and I watched it and we were both very surprised and pleased. Really captured the wonder that Doctor Who is all about and the little bits nods to the current show were more emotional than expected. Gatiss did an incredible job with the script and the all of the performances were, to quote the Ninth Doctor, "Fan-tastic!"
                  "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
                  --Thomas a Kempis

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