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Kids today

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  • Kids today

    Something seems different with the present generation of kids. When I was a nipper ol' Doctor Who used to scare the pants of me and terrify me witless, but now both my young sons sat through Starship Troppers and LOTR trilogy without blinking an eyelid!? Perhaps my experiences have been inherited by them or perhaps they are just naturally stronger I dont know but they appear to cope better than I did at their age. Every generation matures younger in many different ways it seems...

  • #2
    Either that or we just watch too much TV and thus see terrible things at a young age.

    Thanos (18)

    P.S. Oddly enough I'm a bit of an exception. Hate horror films because non-horror films scare me enough. I've an over active imagination. I cried when Mufassa (spelling?) died in The Lion King and all it takes to scare the crap out of me is the Jaws Theme song.

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    • #3
      da-da

      da-da

      da-da

      da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da . . .Chomp

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      • #4
        Perhaps we're just becoming more sophisticated when it comes to viewing media, and the kids instantly spot the obvious "fakeness" of the bugs and the orks. Personally I hated gore as a child (I almost threw up after watching fifteen minutes of Robocop when I was 13) but once you start seeing these "behind the scenes" things, you learn that no one is actually losing an arm or getting dropped in burning lava, they're just actors doing a job. It is possible to be both a sympathetic and caring human being and appreciate the "art" of horror films and such. In my humble opinion.

        D...
        "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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        • #5
          I know what you mean D,
          after doing video editing~ I can't watch TV the same way.
          I'm constantly watching the transitions, camera angles, blue screen flaws, cgi effects ect...instead of enjoying the program as a whole.
          I image thats why directors/actors are so fickle in their opinions?
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          The kids today
          can see so much real life sickness
          on the news and internet
          that the movie industry will have to step it up a notch
          to scare the little bastards.
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          downtown wedding gown:

          http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=4146756343

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jules
            da-da

            da-da

            da-da

            da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da-da . . .Chomp
            Man, Jaws scared the crap out of me as a kid! It looks so cheesy now. Even my kids think so...

            Originally posted by DyvimTvarsBodyguard
            downtown wedding gown
            That guy lives near me. He was on the local news this morning. He said he's going to buy "beer and Mariners tickets" with the money. I have a feeling the high-bidder won't follow through, though.
            "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
            --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DyvimTvarsBodyguard
              I know what you mean D,
              after doing video editing~ I can't watch TV the same way.
              I'm constantly watching the transitions, camera angles, blue screen flaws, cgi effects ect...instead of enjoying the program as a whole.
              Exactly. I did Media at college, and now I'm very anal about these things. There's an episode of Buffy where there's a boom mic in shot and it bugs me every single time I watch it.

              Having said that, I am a sissy and will pretty much cry at the drop of a hat. I know fake gore when I see it, and I can shrug it off, but when someone's voice starts trembling I'm a total mess. I was even getting a bit tearful during Kill Bill Vol 2... when the Bride sees her daughter for the first time... sniffle... but that's good acting and music for you.

              I think the last film that actually scared me was The Blair Witch Project, but a lot of their actors' fear was for real, and I think that really carried through the screen.

              D...
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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              • #8
                Dawn of the Dead 1 v. Dawn of the Dead 2?

                Romero version was scary in a thought-provoking way, and the gore at the end was obviously imported from a butcher's bin and so not that frightening.

                2004 version made me jump a couple of times, but the scariest bit was the thought of a zombie child being born. Having said which, it was more than a thought, whereas Romero just had the "bump" flying off in a chopper.

                I still try to get my kid to go to bed occasionally when there's a 20-year-old 18-certificate on, and I am looked on as an official old fart for it. :?
                \"Killing me won\'t bring back your apples!\"

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                • #9
                  I guess we oldsters have always been wondering what's going on in the heads of the young generations... and since we can't really bear the thought that our brain cells might atrophying or petrifying, we automatically conclude that the young'uns are at fault. I believe some of the oldest potsherds found in Egypt have hieroglyphs lamenting the deplorable moral state of the young, soon to bring about the end of the world or something like that.

                  I even used to think that the ability to feel the chill of a good horror flick was something that vanished in me sometime in my teens. Still I sometimes watch them in search of that frisson... To my surprise, it was a movie like "Scream 3" that brought it back. The meta-talk about horror movies in it playing against the seemingly irrational killer working with ever faster speed like a fire demon, seemed to do it for me. Once it gets down to the usual gore, it's just unpleasant, but the angst building up in the better narrative parts, playing off against the two prequels, gave me the thrills.

                  Weird what works to scare one... The giant killer's mask on the wall seeming to contemplate the characters with an unknown malevolence was more uncanny than all the gore I've seen in movies together. Guess it's the irrationality of it, in my case. Weird how unpredictibable it is what scares people...
                  "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jagged
                    The giant killer's mask on the wall seeming to contemplate the characters with an unknown malevolence was more uncanny than all the gore I've seen in movies together.
                    Consider Hitchcock's "Psycho." The "Shower Scene" is considered by many to be one of the most terrifying scenes in horror cinema, but it used only about a thimble-full of blood, the knife never actually touched the woman's body, and the movie is in black and white!

                    Gore doesn't make it scary, just disturbingly detailed. Good writing, good directing and good acting are what make a movie terrifying.
                    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
                      Good writing, good directing and good acting are what make a movie terrifying.
                      So very true, my Psychedlic War Veteran... I even think that the irony in the Scream movies helped intensifying the horror, rather than spoil it as people use to argue.
                      "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
                        I'm very anal about these things... I am a sissy and will pretty much cry at the drop of a hat... I was even getting a bit tearful... when the Bride sees her daughter for the first time... sniffle...
                        Too much information you extraneous third nipple freak!

                        :P

                        No, I'm sorry. Krunky loves Da Crow Seer.

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                        • #13
                          That guy lives near me. He was on the local news this morning. He said he's going to buy "beer and Mariners tickets" with the money. I have a feeling the high-bidder won't follow through, though.
                          I think they finaly weeded out the non-serious bidders.
                          It was up to 13 mil. sold for $3,385.00, which is not to outrageous.
                          That guy should write a weekly column.


                          third nipple~ what third nipple~? 8O?

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                          • #14
                            kids any day

                            so my 5 yr old son walks in on me watching matrix revolutions during the invasion on zion... he should have been in bed, but i figured, what the heck, lets see how he responds, so i muted out the language and let him watch... he totally got it, was completely into it. note to child protective services, i sent him packing straight to bed before things got "gory".
                            he enjoyed what he saw.
                            on the other hand, when he rented the jimmy neutron movie, for those of you who do not know, its a little bit of parker lewis can't lose mixed with a jan hammer video... anyway, there's this big spacey, worm deal, that absolutely scares the buh-jesus out of him and it is fakey fake looking.
                            my point:
                            people are, in my modest opinion, becoming more sophisticated and desensitized at an earlier age these days. alfred hitchcock said once that the threat of violence is scarier than violence itself. the cinema of 40 years ago, that may have held true. but in this day and age, kids are innundated with thinly veiled innuendo and eyewitness to visceral and abstarct acts of violence at young ages, it seems to tweak the "grown-up" dials in the brain a little sooner than may be healthy. it also is doing irreperable damage to their imaginations. i try to read prose to my son, good child fantasy that i read; cs lewis, tolkien, etc, but he tends to enjoy comics and picture books more.. it's a start, but at what price? it occurs to me that the average middle class child in western civilizations has seen pretty much all there is to see that can happen to a human body, for good or ill, by the age of 6 or 7.
                            hypocrisy! i'll be that honest. sure, as a working parent, after a long day, it's easier to throw a movie on or put all my hopes on the v-chip to stimulate my child. and i really don't even want to open the debate to more invovled parenting... i stay as involved as i can with a ridiculous schedule.
                            to meander back to the matter at hand, kids these days are less shockable because i think we inadverdantly put the burden of growing up on them too soon and this is either reflected by or a symptom of the entertainment we subject them to.
                            on a side note, my brother showed me pink floyd's the wall when i was probably 9 or 10, and that is probably one of the most disturbing things i ever saw in childhood. that dvd is one of the foundations of my current movie collection.

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                            • #15
                              The movie which most scared me as a kid was Disney's Snow White. It remained the source of most of my nightmares into adulthood. I believe it was because no true resolution was offered in the movie. As someone who worried a lot about this while doing comics and still worries about how violence should be depicted, I came to the conclusion that context is the most important element. It's been proposed that the 'job' of the author is to raise the demons and then demonstrate that they can be defeated or contained. Certainly I think this is how children's material should be created. Sometimes, in adult fiction, the demons have to be raised so that the audience can consider the implications and think about how to defeat or contain them. Which is why not all adult material is suitable for children, in my view. My sense of The Matrix is that it is primarily juvenile material pretending to be adult, like most screen sf.
                              What I liked about Dark City was that no implicit resolution was offered.
                              The Matrix talks a lot about stuff, but in terms of its action remains a
                              simple enough story.

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