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J.G. Ballard on UK TV

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  • J.G. Ballard on UK TV

    The South Bank Show on ITV1, this Sunday (17/09) at 23:10.

    Should be worth catching.

  • #2
    How was the show John. I read your post then, dunderhead that I am, managed to forget it was on.

    Comment


    • #3
      It was a good over-view of Ballard's career over 50 years bringing things up to date with his latest novel, Kingdom Come, (the promotion of which was probably why the show got made - but that's the SBS for you).

      As well as Melvyn Bragg interviewing Ballard there were also 'talking heads' from Iain Sinclair, Martin Amis, Will Self & Chris Petit.

      The JGB interview will be available as a podcast from the SBS website from Sept. 18th.

      Did my eyes deceive me or did I spot a 'thanks to' Mike among the end credits? If so, I wonder what it was for.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

      Comment


      • #4
        It was quite good; well worth checking out the Podcast if you have the facilities, although you won't get to see some of the amazing paperback covers his books have had. I've read most of his stuff, but only the library hardbacks in a lot of cases. I wish I'd bought more of the paperbacks back in the 70's and 80's now

        I was rather disappointed that there was no real discussion of the form of his early novels as I would have thought that was easily as radical as the content. Crash, for example, has the effect it does because of the cold and clinical nature of the descriptions. If it was a more generic novel about the erotics of car crashes, it would lose much of its impact.

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        • #5
          I think that's part of restrictions with this particular format. As I mentioned, SBS episdes often seem to be basically plugging a new book, film, album, etc. so a certain amount of screen time needs to be dedicated to that. The remaining air-time then needs to cover - in JGB's case - a 50 year career, which means that a lot of things are going to be over-looked.

          That said, they did spend some time discussing The Atrocity Exhibition and I was interested in JGB's comment that readers often made the mistake of starting at page 1, whereas he intended them to dip into it at random. But it was bit 'tokenist' I suppose.

          That said, I don't always think the SBS is the place for in-depth analysis of an artist. Rather, it's like an introduction to their work, with particular attention paid to a few 'hooks' - in last night's case, Crash (the film as much as the book), Empire of the Sun (ditto), Super-Cannes & Kingdom Come (the new novel).

          Someone at another forum mentioned that Bragg called The Drowned World JGB's "first novel" when it was actually The Wind from Nowhere, which JGB has apparently disowned.
          Last edited by David Mosley; 09-18-2006, 03:45 AM.
          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

          Comment

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