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  • #16
    I loathe Jack Russels. Psychotic little bastards. One of the little scum once took a chunk first out of my poor mutt's rear (the dear old thing was just sitting down, minding his old business), before embedding its teeth in my ol' man's leg.

    If you want a nice dog, you can't go far wrong with Labradors and Golden Retrievers. Flat-Coated Retrievers are fantastic - utterly loony with a ludicrous amount of energy - they act like puppies until they're in the region of 4-6yrs old, but they'd never hurt a fly. I've seen people reach into a flat-coat's mouth many, many times and take food from it without ever being bitten! Silly buggers can be a pain in the sharp-toothed puppy stage though, since they have a tendency to 'mouth' people, which while it's fine with adult teeth, can lead to a few cuts with sharp puppy teeth. All completely accidental, of course. Mine displays a strange mixture of stunning intelligence (oversized bastard once tricked me into getting up from the sofa by doing his usual "I want walkies" routine, and then immediately nicked my seat, from which he cheerily loafed in front of the telly for the next hour or so), and mind-numbing stupidity (cars are for riding in, and are thus not to be feared in any way :roll:), combined with a goodly dose of pathetic cowardice (he has a tendency to run away from terriers who are less than a quarter his size).

    Can't stand cats though - the pesky critters have a tendency to react to my presence with a none-too-casual scratch.
    Arma virumque cano.

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    • #17
      I grew up with cats and I love them. Especially those with siamese in them. Sure, they can be psychotic, but its part of their personality. If you don't have myriad scratchmarks on your person, then you are not being loved.

      For the longest time, the only dogs I liked were the larger variety. Labradors, Bouviers, Rottweillers, and not so large (but still not small) like Staffordshire terriers (which I used to consider ugly, but now I seem them as cute pig-dogs). I never liked the small training dogs until a few years ago, when I met my best friend and her two dogs, an American Eskimo (whom I call Bark), and a Cockapoo (whom I call Beg). The Cockapoo is very friendly, and yes he really does beg a LOT. The American Eskimo is also quite friendly, though sometimes he has problems with other dogs, sort of. Some dogs he likes, and plays with, and some he just gets offended by. Its odd. Its funny watching the dymanics the two have, and they can't stand to be separated.

      I think if I were to get a pet (I can't have one where I live right now), I would likely have to have two (its just not right to have only one). Cats are an obvious choice. As for dogs, I wouldn't mind something like a beagle or a weiner dog (I'm sorry, but using the word daschund just lacks satisfaction, they are weiner dogs). I like ferrets too, even if they attack your feet when you try to sleep.
      Yuki says, "Krimson used to be known as Kommando, but he rarely uses that name anymore. Sometimes he appears as Krimson Gray as well. Do not be confused, he still loves cats and bagels."

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      • #18
        Curiously, some statistics give the Golden Retriever as the number one dog for biting people! Probably folk get a bit too familiar, assuming they are all 100% soft, and freak them out enough to attack. I've only been bitten twice out of approx 20,000 intimate encounters with dogs: once by a super-speed Yorkie, and once by a giant 60 Kg Bull Mastiff that I was trying to put to sleep for being a raving psychotic loony dog with a brain tumour. It chased me around the house (Manchester), stuck its head up the skirt of my poor nurse (which should have been enough to kill anything, to be frank) before biting me in the calf - and holding on, pulling out stringey bits of my gastrocnemius muscle while I tried to prise its jaws apart. Can't really recall how we leapt over the fence. In the end, a police marksman had to snipe him, poor thing. It's like that, Manchester.
        Cats are much quicker. And they use all four feet, too.
        Russian Hamsters are the worst of all. Quantum teeth, you see.

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        • #19
          Two Scottish Terriers here! And I won't give 'em up because one pretty misguided "Leader of the Free World" also got himself one (no, two by now).

          Daughter #1 added a Chihuahua to the menagerie last year. Now, that's a "little stick of dynamite" as MM once said! We use her as a shredder after we saw what she did to my wife's passport a week before she had to travel to the States! The Scotties (female) are far too well behaved, but the Chihuahua ...MY GOD!
          Google ergo sum

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          • #20
            Three cats and two dogs. The ginger tom, Monty, is the most laidback animal on the face of the planet - Slacker personified. He's absolutely gorgeous and has this odd "Chinese wise man" visage. The other two are vary between viscous psychopath and highly strung - sometimes at the same time....

            The dogs - well one is a Tenterfield Fox Terrier (Frank) and the other is a chihuahua (Pashmina). Frank is brilliant - you can see him trying hard to think but it's a bit of a case of the "lights are on but no one's at home". Pashmina is a revelation - I always thought I would hate the little feckers especially after Paris(ite) Hilton. But she (the dog) is remarkably engaging and lots of fun to be around. Frank keeps her pretty much in-line.

            My favourite (and my avatar) is the now sadly deceased Rosie the Australian Blue Heeler. Best dog in the world - loyal, smart, good looking, conversational, good sense of humour... I had better stop now before someone starts coming to unsavoury conclusions.... If you want a great dog, and have the space to let them run around, the Blue Heeler (or even its cousin, the Red heeler can't be beaten :D
            Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
            Bakunin

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            • #21
              I wish you could have been present during that time years ago when I "made friends" with a bobcat that lived near my home.
              Once when I was in Tijuana there was a vicious tomcat which my little cousin named 'El Diablo' :lol:. It would make a racket in the middle of the night hissing and yowling outside the window and was seen chasing dogs many times it size. Strangely enough that same monster acted like a kitten when I offered him food and scratched his head, he would still not let anyone else near him however. My cousin found that out the hard way...There are wild/domestic cat crosses that are not as volatile as true exotics and are a joy to be around. The best are Desert Lynx (Bobcat/Manx http://www.windsweptcats.com/Ice1-23-05B.jpg ) and Savannahs (Serval/Bengal http://www.desertsmeow.com/Nov280021.jpg ), in fact I have decided my next feline companion is going to be an F2 Savannah. Last I checked I had 3 American Eskimos (Enkili, Astrila, Nelvana), 3 Pomeranians(Pinguica, Morusa, Arrayana), 2 Pembroke Welsh Corgis (Fay Valentine, Einstein) an old Shorthair/Ragdoll cat (Clara) a Cockatiel (Mimi) and last but not least a Bearded Dragon (Sendroo)...it's not easy taking care of a veritable zoo but I wouldn't dream of parting with any of them. On top of that I also foster stray dogs/puppies and find homes for them. I am an animal freak but I don't espouse groups like PETA that have gone off the deep end...

              If you want a nice dog, you can't go far wrong with Labradors and Golden Retrievers.
              I have had mixed experiences with Labs, some are very nice but quite a few have injured/killed other dogs and have seriously bitten a lot of people I know. Unless you live out in the country or do a lot of exercise, pick a puppy with an atypically docile temperament (for that breed) you could be in for an unpleasant surprise. Poor breeding and ignorance about their history is to blame IMO...Golden Retrievers which were crossed with spaniels in early development are easier to handle, but they are considered one of the breeds with the highest propensity to develop serious health problems :? .

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Athenys
                Once when I was in Tijuana there was a vicious tomcat which my little cousin named named 'El Diablo' :lol:. It would make a racket in the middle of the night hissing and yowling outside the window and was seen chasing dogs many times it size. Strangely enough that same monster acted like a kitten when I offered him food and scratched his head, he would still not let anyone else near him however. My cousin found that out the hard way...
                You're a person after my own heart! Your experience with El Diablo strikes a common chord. Being accepted by a cat (large or small) is a lot like being accepted as a member of the "pride." (I'm sure you've noticed that, like lions, cats will form social groups in many situations, including out in the wild.)

                Once you're a member of their "pride," you can take all sorts of liberties. Woe to the stranger that tries to do the same! I've seen well-meaning persons get scratched and bitten. This was one of the things I was thinking of when I cautioned that one mustn't take cats' complaisance for granted.

                LSN

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                • #23
                  We had a Siamese cat that leaped from floor onto the expansive shelf of bosom belonging to the vicar's wife just as she hit the top note while singing for the village carollers on a Christmas visit to our home for the benefit of my by then housebound grandma.

                  Random sense of humour, cats.

                  (Hurrah! My 50th posting!)

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                  • #24
                    Stopped at the only eaterie somewhere in the sub-Sahara a few years ago Linda and I met two middle class tourists from Belfast. I think they were part of a tourist group because elsewhere we heard a Yorkshire voice loudly demanding a cup of 'proper tea' (i.e. presumably not mint tea) and someone else moaning about not being able to get a beer. How they got there, we don't recall, because this wasn't normally on the tourist route, but this pair were complaining mightily about the feral cats which ran everywhere in Morocco and effectively keep places clean (though many are missing half a tail where they have ventured too close to the chef's preparation tables). They moaned on and on about it -- how they should be put down, how the smell of their pee wafted up to their hotel window and so on. We argued mildly, as we always do (because our experience shows that cats do a great job of ratting and so on, where they are allowed to roam) that the cats were useful and fundamentally amiable. Our food arrived. The tourists were having
                    cous-cous Royale (which is cous-cous with chicken). As the woman began to launch into yet another diatribe against the feline population a
                    ginger paw appeared from under the table, hooked her piece of chicken and as swiftly disappeared. The look on her face was wonderful and it was all Linda and I could do to keep our own faces straight... I can't help thinking that was another cat with a sense of humour (which almost all cats I've known have had in abundance).
                    Yeah, I'm a great fan of feral cats and have made friends with several packs over the years. Last year we had a bobcoat a few feet from the house which was NOT friendly -- basically all it was saying was 'back off'.
                    Didn't run, but required us to keep our distance. I used to visit a leopard at London Zoo. Ignoring the notices, I used to touch noses with him and scratch his head (all I could reach). Very satisfying hearing a leopard purr, I must say. I suspect the smaller domestic cat is generally speaking a more sensible choice for indoors. I'm almost tempted to go and see that new movie by the people who made Black Stallion, about a cheetah, but I suspect the levels of sentimentality and anthropomorphism will be too high for my pre-diabetic condition...
                    I also had a dog as a boy, my favourite, who could sit on fences and climb trees, much to the disconcertion of local cats. He would actually sit on a fence, balancing there until a cat wandered past and then leap with great glee onto the beast, who would then run up a tree, as often as not, and then watch in feline horror as the dog slowly made his way from branch to branch in pursuit. Of course, I usually had to get him down.
                    He was always coming home with scratches all over his nose or, with some pride, a bit of fur in his mouth. He was a sporting animal and never did any serious damage. I had another dog, a red setter, for whom we had to buy a kitten. Turned out the dog had always had a cat friend and howled the place down for several nights until we got her a kitten. The moment we did that, she was content. As was the kitten.
                    It's a bit like having a massive ogre as your best mate.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
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                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                    • #25
                      'Ere!
                      Groakes as gorn an' pinched me bleedin' fictional ginger tom, ai'nt ee?
                      Cheeky beggar.

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                      • #26
                        Don't worry. We'll tell him to keep a watch out for small figures in the grass. If that happens, you'll know you invented him. These things tend to get a bit out of hand, as I've discovered.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                        • #27
                          Ooer! A Morrigan Short phenomenon, eh? :D
                          The annual's are packed and ready to go, BTW.
                          The time thing is getting disturbingly long, though.

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                          • #28
                            Always wondered why we couldn't have had a companion comic called Bear, but there it is. Might have become confused with one of the naturist magazines, come to think of it.
                            Thanks, pard.
                            Excuse me miss, do you have a Bear behind
                            -- OUCH! --
                            SOB
                            ...the counter ?
                            Yes, I have been a little tired lately.
                            Carry On Petting.

                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                            • #29
                              Another cat we had, this time in a house I shared in my postgrad days with a bunch of medical students, was a big unneutered tom. He had big bulky muscles around the neck like a bouncer or a fighting bull, and went out brawling and womanising every night. He used to get terrible fleas and we had to give him this special medicated cat-flea-shampoo bath every now and then; it took four of us to hold the poor bugger but he seemed to forgive us each time and we always had the wounds to show for it. We called him Mao because when he arrived and we asked him what his name was, he said "Mao." (Stupid, really.) It's to my eternal regret and shame that when I got engaged and moved out to set up a new home with my bride to be, I left him with the folks in the house, where, with (I now realise) misplaced sentimentalism, I thought he belonged. Some of the personnel had changed since the early days and though the newer inmates loved him well enough, I don't think they could really cope with his feline testosterone, and one night he never came back. If you're out there, Mao, salut, and I'm sorry for not taking you with me.

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