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'100 Greatest Tearjerkers' and Bruce Fogle

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  • '100 Greatest Tearjerkers' and Bruce Fogle

    This is not the most obvious place for this rant, but to be brief: For the unfortunate UK viewers who have accidentally watched '100 Greatest Tearjerkers' on the increasingly prurient and lowbrow Channel 4 tonight, I would just like to say that very few veterinary surgeons (like me, to put it in context) would consider the showing of a man crying desperately because he has just been told that his dog has to be 'put to sleep' as suitable and amusing 'entertainment', particularly when accompanied by the pathetic observations that 'men do not cry' of the self-publicist Bruce Fogle and the frankly actionable comments of the ludicrous linkman.
    For someone who had a client (also a non-crying 'man') kill themselves three hours after I had to euthanase his beloved pet, this sort of thing is unforgivable. The additional insult of seeing a well-known member of my profession grinningly cooperate with this crap is too much. I'd just like to reassure correspondents to this forum (many of whom, like its progenitor and host, I know are great animal-lovers and humanists) that the majority of 'my lot' of vets are a damn sight more empathic than many of those who inflict their smug mugs via mass-media upon us, who are frequently from a former generation of quasi-scientific farm labourers who were allowed out with sharp instruments. The sooner they retire and let the professionals take over, the better. (Well, some of 'em are OK, of course, but you understand what I mean; we are suffering from the lack of sensitivity and half-heartedness of our predecessors).
    Right! That's it. Just had to try to damage-limit there!
    Back to Mornington Crescent... :? [/i]

  • #2
    Have to say I pointedly avoided the show (even going so far as to "tut" at the trailers), having long since tired of these pointless "countdown" shows... how long before they do The 100 Greatest 100 Greatests? The clip you mentioned was also in the trailers, so I know what you're talking about, and I admire your conviction. If I had a pet, it would certainly reassure me to know that there were people like you out there... actually you should be glad I don't have a pet, because then you'd never get time to do any writing. I'd be e-mailing you every time the mutt sneezed!

    No doubt if anything bad ever did happen to the poor thing, I would cry like a baby... but I certainly wouldn't sign any release forms allowing mean-spirited TV hacks to chuckle at my misery.
    "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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    • #3
      You should get a nice doglet or puss-puss, Dee; you are the right sort of human, if you get my drift!
      Mind you, I'll be sending you a shedload of text submissions to illustrate soon, so you might not have time :D

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Perdix
        You should get a nice doglet or puss-puss, Dee; you are the right sort of human, if you get my drift!
        Very kind of you to say. After watching Resident Evil I decided I'd actually quite like non-zombie versions of the zombie dogs. I'm no expert so we'll just have to call them "pointy-eared-scary-black-death-beasts" for now. I doubt my parents would appreciate them scampering around though!

        Originally posted by Perdix
        Mind you, I'll be sending you a shedload of text submissions to illustrate soon, so you might not have time :D
        8O And just when I'd accepted an invitation to play back-up bongos for Slipknot! Oh well, I'll have to tell Pig-face I have a prior engagement. I'm sure he'll understand.... lovely fellow, that Pig-face.

        Anyhoo, looking forward to seeing what pops out of the text pipe.
        "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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        • #5
          I think they were dobermanns. well, zombie dobermanns.

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          • #6
            Yes, probably dobies. Although I have quite frequently had a 'pointy-eared scary black death beast' in my consulting room. Usually they're called 'Tibby'.

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            • #7
              I've just Googled up some photos, and you're both quite right... dobermanns! Also, of course, the inspiration for an enjoyable French gangster movie of the same name... it's probably wrong to choose pets based on their filmography though, isn't it?

              Still, as names go "Scary Black Death Beast" isn't bad... possibly "Beast" for short? Or Tarquin. One of the two.
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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              • #8
                Hmm. Not the FIRST dog I'd get, if I wasn't used to having pets.
                I think the Tibby variety might be worth trying first... Contrary to all anthropomorphic myths, cats are pack animals and behave with the characteristic affection and intelligence of most pack animals (towards their own pack, that is...which is probably why dobie owners are always heard to say how sweet and good natured their family pet is... :) ).

                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
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                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
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                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                • #9
                  Perdix, maybe this will make you fell better :lol: :

                  http://www.scarysquirrel.org/special...amy/rant3.html

                  What you noted is upsetting but hardly surprising. A disturbing number of people have sadistic tendencies, 'Reality' TV capitalizes mostly on that. Somehow it reminds me too much of the Roman Coliseum slaughter fests of yore, where cruelty is elevated to the level of an artform. I feel sympathy for some people, while others laugh outright at their misery, even despite the fact that it isn't self-inflicted...sad. I also watched a part of a program on some cable channel where people claimed that anyone who wanted to develop a friendship with their romantic partner was nuts, implying of course that you don't have to even like or get along well...That makes no sense to me. Choosing someone you can't stand, you can't trust as a partner boils down to a dalliance, nothing more. According to these people it is unrealistic and passe to have a relationship based both on eros and agape. Disfunctional is the only adjective I have for such an approach to 'romance'...

                  Speaking of pets, I do pro dog shows and breeding so I am very familiar with the characteristics of many dog breeds. My top choices for anyone wanting a companionable canine who won't become a part-time job and cost an arm and a leg in vet bills in would be: the American Eskimo Dog, Xolo and the Ibizan Hound. All of them don't require much grooming, are of moderate size, easily trainable and have better overall personalities. Terriers are for the most part highly overrated IMO, many (like the Jack Russell) retain working/hunting instincts along with a temperament that makes them poorly suited for the average small home/apartment dweller. Along with Beagles and Border Collies such dogs are best left to experienced dog handlers living in a more rural setting.

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                  • #10
                    I don't know how apropos this is, but
                    "Lives Of The Monster Dogs" by Kirsten Bakis is a wonderful and strange little book which I keep going back to.

                    And "The Long Patrol", one of Brian Jacques' Mossflower saga, has a climactic battle scene involving the tragedy of the great Cregga Rose-Eyes (the Badger warrior-queen), which made me cry whenever I read it out loud to my son and still even now gives me goose-pimples just thinking about it.

                    Two correctives to humans' ability, if that's the word, to be flip and callous where animals are concerned.

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                    • #11
                      PS

                      The "Rose-Eyes" in question is the blood-mist that veiled Cregga's eyes when she was in the grip of a berserker battle-rage.

                      We're not talking cosy little kiddies' fables, here.
                      xxx

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                      • #12
                        I agree with you Athenys re. dogs. Jack Russell's are great dogs but are best kept if you have a large rat problem (for instance). They have incredible energy and need a lot of interaction, preferably in the country. I knew a number of great JRs when we lived in Yorkshire. They are also inclined to attack other dogs -- I've seen a very surprised Alsatian (German Shepherd) with a Jack Russell hanging on it, for instance.
                        Labs are very good-natured. Shetland sheepdogs can be hysterical without enough to do, as I know to my cost (having agreed to look after one for a friend while he was at uni and winding up keeping the bugger
                        for his whole very long life). And don't be fooled into thinking every Old English Sheepdog is a Nana from Peter Pan... If they decide to bite (as one bit my daughter) they have massive, powerful jaws...
                        But that's another story, of an attempt to save the dog from being put
                        down -- it was completely untrained and probably barmy.
                        Of course, I've had good experience with whippets and lurchers, but then
                        my Anglo Saxon ancestors are from Yorkshire.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                        • #13
                          Athenys and MM make some excellent observations on canids.
                          When I was a naturalised Northerner, we kept three Greyhounds, a Borzoi, a Border x Bearded Collie, Mooncat, the black polydactyl that used to trip over his extra toes, a tame jackdaw, a house rabbit and a few dozen Great Diving Beetles (yes, I know). The Greyhounds used to sleep all day on the sofas (except when the cat stared at them, when they ran off) and would tolerate only a twenty minute walk before falling over, knackered. One of our vet nurses used to race them at the notoriously crooked 'Flapper' tracks; the dog, Patch, lost every race until he broke his hock: we fixed it, but it healed in a curve, badly bent: after that, he won everything. The Beardie-Border Collie I used to take on a twelve-mile fell run: we'd get back, I'd have a shower and he'd bring me his lead in his mouth so that I could take him for a walk. The Borzoi was elegant but looked like a walking shaggy turd after an hour on the boggy moors. She eventually died of a unique disease that we wrote up in one of the veterinary journals. The jackdaw used to perch on visitors and crap on them until he went off with a lady friend. The Great Diving Beetles bit anything that got into their tank, including various children and the cat's foot. The Rabbit was found murdered one afternoon - we don't know if it was the hounds or the cat. I think the cat. He acted far too innocently afterwards.
                          I'd generally recommend a cross-breed. Dog, not beetle.

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                          • #14
                            Well, I was going purely on looks and movie-connections, as is my tendency. I'm more than happy to bow to the experience of the panel. :)

                            :oops: I didn't really want to mention this before, in such pro-cat company, but felines have always scared the crap out of me. A year or two ago I saw a programme which explained that cats consider being stared at to be a challenge of some sort, which is (presumably) why they often attacked me as I tried desperately to detect a sliver of pity or compassion in their gaze. I learnt my lesson eventually, and I think we've now agreed to give each other a wide berth. Perhaps I could be convinced to warm to them, perhaps not.

                            Obviously if I were to consider getting a pet, I would do some research beforehand to make sure that we were "compatible", so there's no need to worry on that score.
                            "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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                            • #15
                              I wish you could have been present during that time years ago when I "made friends" with a bobcat that lived near my home. People who saw it come to me to be scratched and petted expressed consternation that bordered on panic. The manner in which it growled at too-enthusiastic onlookers didn't help its reputation, either. If you ever try it, be warned: they play kind of rough: they like to play a version of "kitty-tag" reminscent of that played by house cats. The difference: getting hit by the bobcat feels like getting hit with a baseball bat.

                              You might have viewed the creatures differently after such an experience. There are differences between the behavior of the various members of felidae, but there are a lot of common principles.

                              It's very important with cats to understand their moods; their body language (watch the tail and ears for starters) is extremely revealing.

                              Making friends with feral cats is something I do often. They're nice animals, and they keep certain pests in control, too. Patience and observation are the keys to making friends with them. Bringing food helps, too. :lol:

                              A final thing: people tend to take dogs and their acceptance for granted. With cats, this isn't a good idea. I always approach even domesticated cats as if they were feral.

                              LSN

                              Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
                              :oops: I didn't really want to mention this before, in such pro-cat company, but felines have always scared the crap out of me. A year or two ago I saw a programme which explained that cats consider being stared at to be a challenge of some sort, which is (presumably) why they often attacked me as I tried desperately to detect a sliver of pity or compassion in their gaze. I learnt my lesson eventually, and I think we've now agreed to give each other a wide berth. Perhaps I could be convinced to warm to them, perhaps not.

                              . . .

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