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Bass

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  • Bass

    Anyone have any good tips for a newly learning Bass Player?

  • #2
    Learn it form Lemmy. Sorry, just kidding :P
    \\

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    • #3
      Practice......
      Not the answer you wanted I know, but the only sure way to progress as a performer and writer.
      Lessons......
      I had classical guitar lessons for 3 years and it helped me no end.
      Gear......
      If you are just starting out and are serious about bass, spend a little bit more on your bass/amp/effects. Trust me - having a good quality instrument is a lot easier to learn on than a poor or mediocre one.
      Books.....
      Don't you just love 'em? Invest in some theory literature and be disciplined enough to study regularly.
      Inspiration......
      Listen to bands with excellent bass players and learn their music. (much as I love lemmy....no I don't mean him!)
      Collaborate......
      Meet other musicians, write music, form a band, play gigs, have a good time.
      Exchange......
      There are lots of really good sites and forums out there where you can share info and learn.

      .....well, you did ask.

      here are a couple of my songs if you want a listen.. http://mindsculpture.dmusic.com/ or here http://www.nolfanatics.com/

      Hope that helps.

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      • #4
        WOW, thanks a bunch! Yeah, ive been practicing my ass off. Me and a ciuple of my buds get together every weekend and jam together. Its a big help cuz it motivates me to get better each week.

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        • #5
          Get The Bass Grimoire. It breaks down scales, modes. chord relartions and will save you the cost of a year's worth of lessons if you're an absolute beginner. It makes everything really easy to understand and it's under $20.

          If you're not absolutely sure your instrument is in perfect shape, take it to a professional and make sure it's set up right. As mentioned, if you practice on a bad instument-you'll get nowhere fast.

          Practice in a quiet room without an amp to cover up your fretbuzz.

          Make sure you practice standing up or make sure that when you sit, your arms do not change position from when you stand. A lot of people practice sitting down with the bass up in their chest then re-learn their stuff at gig time.

          It's great to have bass gods like Mike Manring and Jonas Hellborg to listen and aspire to, but anyone can recognise that as fantastic bass work. When you hear a record like Harry Connick Jr's "Star Turtle" and admire every bass track-you've made it as a bassplayer.


          Lemmy Rocks.


          ~Jimm

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          • #6
            i don't know if you can tell, but the book title is a link
            http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books

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            • #7
              Oh and visit www.activebass.com frequently.

              ~Jimm

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              • #8
                I know this sounds very obvious but something I have noticed is that beginning bass players (and a lot of musicians) learn a lot of different riffs but are not able to play complete songs from beginning to end. If you learn a few songs completely (the entire arrangements) then you can get together with other musicians and jam effectivley. This is where my learning really began. Pick songs that you can learn entirely at first. Playing songs with other musicians motivates you as well as I'm sure you know.

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                • #9
                  PLAY WITH OTHER, LIVE MUSICIANS. The give and take between players in the same room cannot be learned from a book. All the tips given here are great, but I wouldn't say ESSENTIAL (for example, equipment. Geezer Butler learned on a telecaster with the top two strings removed), except for the playing live part.

                  My opinion only.

                  Oh yeah, Lemmy rules.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill
                    PLAY WITH OTHER, LIVE MUSICIANS. The give and take between players in the same room cannot be learned from a book. All the tips given here are great, but I wouldn't say ESSENTIAL (for example, equipment. Geezer Butler learned on a telecaster with the top two strings removed), except for the playing live part.

                    My opinion only.

                    Oh yeah, Lemmy rules.
                    That's actually the most important thing. If you can't get a full jam, Jam with a drummer.

                    ~Jimm

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