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Pan's Labyrinth [2x merged]

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  • Pan's Labyrinth [2x merged]

    I read up a little bit on this film and decided it is definatly worth seeing.
    Going to try getting there this weekend.

    Heres the link for trailers and such...

    http://www.panslabyrinth.com/

  • #2
    To avoid repeating myself, my comments on this film have been posted here; http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showt...?t=4622&page=4

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    • #3
      Thanks, gentlemen, looks like an interesting bit of European cinema. Makers, cast and synopsis are good for it.
      Hope it gets shown here in time. The basic requirement, as you postulate, Hawksun, having a clue about the Spanish Civil War, I can come up with.
      Google ergo sum

      Comment


      • #4
        I really want to see this movie, but I'm buggered if I can find one of the "select cinemas" in the NJ area where I can see it.

        Saying that.... I've just found one! I'll be on my way to see it this week!
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

        Comment


        • #5
          On a plane to Berlin on Sunday I discovered that Pan's Labyrinth was reviewed in last weekend's Financial Times. Harry Eyres compares the movie to one 30 years older:
          Just over 30 years separate the two films: strong thematic similarities link them. Both look at the aftermath of the Spanish civil war through the eyes of a young girl. Both show fantasy and reality colliding in traumatic fashion. Extraordinary performances from young actresses grace both films. But in other respects Victor Erice's Spirit of the Beehive of 1973 and Guillermo del Toro's recently released Pan's Labyrinth could hardly be more different. The differences have much to tell us about the evolution of our times and of our imaginations.
          I regret not remembering Spirit of the Beehive which eventually Eyres describes as the film with more depth and complexity. The review (warning: SPOILERS!) has not put me off, I still would like to see Pan's Labyrinth. Yet I wonder if it is a sign of our times to favour - and lastly produce - simpler, more easily consumable work - like for example (my opinion) V - For Vendetta as opposed to 1984, Brazil and other old masterpieces.
          Google ergo sum

          Comment


          • #6
            I believe it has just picked up 6 Oscar nominations? I think it was 6, including best screenplay and best foreign film and some technical awards.
            I've seen the trailers, which make me want to give it a look, but also Mark Kermode (a UK film critic) has been waxing lyrical about it. I've found that his and my tastes are similar in many respects - he says to go and see it! I suppose it's all getting inevitable now.....
            Maybe I'l get back to this thread with my own critique at a later date.
            He's well smoked

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            • #7
              Originally posted by L'Etranger
              ...Eyres describes as the film with more depth and complexity...I wonder if it is a sign of our times to favour - and lastly produce - simpler, more easily consumable work - like for example (my opinion) V - For Vendetta as opposed to 1984, Brazil and other old masterpieces.
              Beauty - or in this case, Art - (as ever) is in the eye of the beholder.

              Seems strange to describe films made in 1984 as "old masterpieces", but I guess we are getting to that stage, aren't we?

              Perhaps it's a generational thing? I have a copy of SotB on video (somewhere) but have never managed to sit through it once, whereas del Toro's earlier Spanish Civil War film, The Devil's Backbone, I found much more accessible, and consequently, enjoyable.

              There is, of course, a tendency - though I have no idea whether it afflicts Mr Eyres - on the part of some critics to look on the Past as a halcyonic age against which the Preset can't possibly compete. (Leslie Halliwell famously never gave any film made after 1967 a maximum '4 stars' in his annual film guide.) I suppose the question I'd like to ask is did del Toro make his film in a attempt to compete with Erice's work? If not, I'm not sure it's fair to draw comparisons of one artist's work with another. The true question the Critic must seek to answer (imo) is "Does this film succeed on it's own terms alone?" - anything else is superfluous.

              (PS. I haven't seen PL yet either, but I'm fairly sure to buy it on DVD eventually or catch it on TV.)
              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

              Comment


              • #8
                Del Toro's The Devil's Backbone is better than Pan's Labyrinth IMO - and is surprisingly similar.
                Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I will go to see the film in any case, as I'm interested in the story. It usually takes a little longer until foreign language productions get released here as 95% of them are dubbed (and well dubbed fortunately) for distribution here. The merrits of this are a different discussion . But in any case I'll report back when I've seen it.

                  Originally posted by David Mosley
                  Beauty - or in this case, Art - (as ever) is in the eye of the beholder.

                  Seems strange to describe films made in 1984 as "old masterpieces", but I guess we are getting to that stage, aren't we?
                  Yes, obviously. The 80's are indeed already very far away from what we have now. Also the world situation, there were still the two great political blocks, students still demonstrated (as opposed to day when they worry about the quality of the university's library), and of course internet, email and virtuality were still Fairie Tales - or something out of George Lukas Studios. Needless to say the 80's were very important for me personally, and subjectively one tends to magnify much that you experience in certain important phases.

                  Originally posted by David Mosley
                  Perhaps it's a generational thing? I have a copy of SotB on video (somewhere) but have never managed to sit through it once, whereas del Toro's earlier Spanish Civil War film, The Devil's Backbone, I found much more accessible, and consequently, enjoyable.

                  There is, of course, a tendency - though I have no idea whether it afflicts Mr Eyres - on the part of some critics to look on the Past as a halcyonic age against which the Preset can't possibly compete. (Leslie Halliwell famously never gave any film made after 1967 a maximum '4 stars' in his annual film guide.) I suppose the question I'd like to ask is did del Toro make his film in a attempt to compete with Erice's work? If not, I'm not sure it's fair to draw comparisons of one artist's work with another. The true question the Critic must seek to answer (imo) is "Does this film succeed on it's own terms alone?" - anything else is superfluous.

                  (PS. I haven't seen PL yet either, but I'm fairly sure to buy it on DVD eventually or catch it on TV.)
                  Yes, it could well be just pretentious of Mr. Eyres to compare the movies. Perhaps he is just showing off his knowledge. I am not familiar with his reviews. The review seemed intelligent enough though to mention it in the Pans Labirinth thread. As I myself don't remember seeing Beehive I take it as an invitation to get myself a copy after watching Pan's Labirinth for myself and if the whole matter seems interesting enough to pursue.
                  Last edited by L'Etranger; 01-24-2007, 01:26 AM.
                  Google ergo sum

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is what I wrote on the MediaWeb forum:
                    Saw "Pan's Labyrith" last night and had a great time. Deliciously dark, uncomprimisingly brutal (as the plot demands), this is an adult (no, not that sort) fairytale that engages the eyes, ears, heart and mind. Set in the mountains of Northern Spain during 1944 (the allies have just landed in Normandy) the tensions of the Civil War are still boiling. Ofelia, a twelve(ish) year old escapes the bleak realities of the war and her sickly (and heavily pregnant) mother's relationship with her step-father, a brutal Captain in the Spanish Nationalist Army engaged in hunting down the remaining Communists and Anarchists.

                    The visuals are gorgeous, the sound is superb, the performances are all first class. I really missed not being able to enjoy this in its native tongue - though the sub titles seemed quite good. This is quality cinema from a skilled and passionate film maker. If you have seen "Hell Boy" you will be familiar with Guillermo Del Torro's style (it even has a very Mike Mignola moment with the dinner guests arriving in the rain...). Del Torro casts a few wicked barbs at the complicity of the Catholic church and capitalists in the brutalities of the Nationalist regime.

                    Ivana Baquero's performance as Ofelia is at the heart of this beautifully told story of childhood fantasy. It will make you smile, make you cry, make you cringe. And the Moanna's realm bares more than a passing resemblance to Mu-Oria.

                    Highly Recommended (though not for children!)....
                    Easily the best fantasy film I have seen in ten years.... If it was up to me Guillermo Del Toro would be first choice for directing any Elric film (FILM not MOVIE)....
                    Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
                    Bakunin

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                    • #11
                      All the more intrigued now, thanks Groakes. Too bad it is not out here yet.
                      Google ergo sum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Finally now...

                        I'm just back from Pan's Labirinth.
                        Well, I am sorry to say that I was disappointed by the lack of depth, both in the plot and the characters. Effects are okay, but you get just as good ones in every Harry Potter sequel.
                        The message that imagination beats the brutal reality was already brought home, and with more skill, by Roberto Benigni in La vita è bella (Academy Award 1999).
                        It would be okay to see the flick among others, but it is nominated for several Oscars, and for that it is over-rated.
                        Google ergo sum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by L'Etranger View Post
                          Finally now...

                          I'm just back from Pan's Labirinth.
                          Well, I am sorry to say that I was disappointed by the lack of depth, both in the plot and the characters. Effects are okay, but you get just as good ones in every Harry Potter sequel.
                          The message that imagination beats the brutal reality was already brought home, and with more skill, by Roberto Benigni in La vita è bella (Academy Award 1999).
                          It would be okay to see the flick among others, but it is nominated for several Oscars, and for that it is over-rated.
                          Sorry you didn't enjoy it as much as I did. I thought the plot and the characters showed a beautiful degree of subtlty and depth. The parallels between Ophelia's fantasy and the adult world I found to be sensitively and cleverly constructed. The performances were first rate and the look and feel of the piece are at once sensuous yet strangely cold.

                          Effects are, well, effects. In Pan's Labyrinth they are sat nicely within the film and not the dominant presence.

                          I wouldn't say that the themes in La vita è bella /Life is Beautiful were comparable. La vita è bella deals with an adult attempting shield a child from horror through play. It is told from an adult's (well Roberto Benigni's) perspective.

                          Pan's Labyrinth on the other hand is told from the perspective of the child . Ophelia retreats from reality into fantasy to save herself from the horrendous realities she must face.

                          The Guillermo del Torro's direction of Pan's Labyrinth is also much more consistent than Begnini's. Pan's Labyrinth is dreamlike, La vita è bella is almost hysterical.

                          Still, each to their own and congrats on the Oscar
                          Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
                          Bakunin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The message that imagination beats the brutal reality was already brought home, and with more skill, by Roberto Benigni in La vita è bella (Academy Award 1999).
                            You should have added in the mind of the girl !

                            If you add this, you give the movie his due and he is much more skilled that you credit him !

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              While it is certainly a very striking film indeed, I have to say I'm a little surprised as to how it is sooo universally loved to the degree that it is.

                              I feel the film needed at least one more big fantasy sequence somewhere in the last reel. I also had a few problems with some of the characters actions vs their motivations, as much of it didn't ring true, and its plot seemed very linear to me.

                              I'm certainly not slagging it off ( for a fantasy film it's very good indeed), but I'm not sure that it is quite as good as the media are making it out to be. I'm reminded of Tim Burton factor, whose films are generally crap, yet his fan-base buy into their whole modern-fairy tale thang, regardless of their lack of cinematic quality: people want to like his films, therefore they do. Obviously Pan's Labirinth is much better than anything Burton has ever cooked up, but I feel that the comparison stands: there is good will towards it as it is a gritty adult fantasy that pulls no punches, so people are prepared to over look some of its short comings.
                              forum

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                              2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
                              3. a public meeting place for open discussion

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