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Revisiting movies you've not seen in a long time

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  • Revisiting movies you've not seen in a long time

    What films have you recently rewatched and has time changed your opinion?

    I'm giving Alexander another go. The Revisited cut has better pacing than the theatrical version but the Irish accents still bother me. Even Jared Leto has a lilt and he's American.
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

  • #2
    I revisit a lot of old stuff with my daughter. Tremors did really well. Phantasm, not so much--though we both agreed there was a good story lurking under the obviously fake blood and cringeworthy sexuality.

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    • #3
      Hawk the Slayer
      Watched it numerous times as a child. Borrowed the vhs from a friend recently and watched it with my 19 and 23 year old son and daughter. All I can say is we laughed. We laughed a lot. Not as inspiring as it was when I was young, but the soundtrack still holds up pretty good for the time imo. And the archer reminded me of my glory days at the arcade playing Gauntlet.
      I('d) tell you all, we are young at the end of this cycle, and there may be no rest even when we are done.- Devin Townsend

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post
        I revisit a lot of old stuff with my daughter. Tremors did really well. Phantasm, not so much--though we both agreed there was a good story lurking under the obviously fake blood and cringeworthy sexuality.
        I saw Tremors not so long ago, too. It held up surprisingly well for me, too.

        I have recently revisited a lot of my childhood favorites with my kids, who are just now old enough to sit through them (4 and 2). Disney’s Robin Hood was still pretty solid. It was my all time favorite, even though Berry can tell us really about Reinhardt the Fox, not Robin Hood. Dumbo was traumatizing for my 4 year old, and traumatized me for far different reasons. The racism is not subtle or hidden.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Doc View Post
          I saw Tremors not so long ago, too. It held up surprisingly well for me, too.

          I have recently revisited a lot of my childhood favorites with my kids, who are just now old enough to sit through them (4 and 2). Disney’s Robin Hood was still pretty solid. It was my all time favorite, even though Berry can tell us really about Reinhardt the Fox, not Robin Hood. Dumbo was traumatizing for my 4 year old, and traumatized me for far different reasons. The racism is not subtle or hidden.
          Kudos on the Tremors. My kid's about to turn 11. When she was in your kids' age range she was obsessed with The Wizard of Oz. I must have watched it at least 50 times, and that was probably half of her viewings. Whatever else it is, it is one snappily scripted production. Return to Oz, though more true to Baum in many ways, was not nearly so tightly scripted.

          Old and new Disney stuff was also on the menu a lot. I remember the "racism forward" of Dumbo quite well, though I'm not sure if I watched it with her. Mostly, I just found a lot of the old Disney stuff heavy on the sentimentality. I suppose Snow White was the one I enjoyed re-watching (multiple times) the most.

          Also, maybe I should rewatch Tinkerbell and the Lost Treasure because I'm going to recommend it to you. Especially if either of your kids is in a fairies phase, like mine was when she was their age. I like Independent Tinkerbell better than Peter Pan Associate Tinkerbell.

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          • #6
            I recently bought a bunch of second-hand DVDs, including, 'Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Director's Cut).' Just watched it. Surprisingly solid piece of good old fashioned, 'hard,' science fiction. I saw the original series episode, The Changeling, back when it was on the BBC for the first time. I also have a copy of, 2001, to which this movie owes a lot, trippy graphics included. However, it also adds the humanity & (let's face it), schmaltz, which Kubrick's flawed masterpiece sadly lacks. AIthough this is no masterpiece, I still found it very watchable. Plus, Isaac Asimov was an adviser & the music's great.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
              I recently bought a bunch of second-hand DVDs, including, 'Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Director's Cut).' Just watched it. Surprisingly solid piece of good old fashioned, 'hard,' science fiction. I saw the original series episode, The Changeling, back when it was on the BBC for the first time. I also have a copy of, 2001, to which this movie owes a lot, trippy graphics included. However, it also adds the humanity & (let's face it), schmaltz, which Kubrick's flawed masterpiece sadly lacks. AIthough this is no masterpiece, I still found it very watchable. Plus, Isaac Asimov was an adviser & the music's great.
              Sorry PM ...on the subject of Stanley Kubrick i'm firmly of the opinion that 2001 : A Space Odyssey is Not a flawed masterpiece (beyond That cringe- worthy phrase ' beyond the infinite' of course.)

              I do have a personal bias i will admit : i first saw this film in a Brisbane cinema in 1973 at about the age of seven and not only could i even then come to my own interpretation of this most abstract of Space Operas; it instantly instilled in me a desire to write science fiction some time in my own future. A good part of what i do admire about Kubrick as a Director and storyteller is his distinctly Un- American lack of sentimentality when dealing with the human condition and all the related shortcomings and grotesqueness of human nature in general. Not everyone's cup of cinematic tea, true and yet there certainly was only a need for one Steven Spielberg or James Cameron.
              Last edited by Kymba334; 10-09-2020, 03:40 AM.
              Mwana wa simba ni simba

              The child of a lion is also a lion - Swahili Wisdom

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              • #8
                Well, seeing as you two mentioned Kubrick, I'll mention that in preparation for watching Doctor Sleep with the young one, I insisted we first had to watch The Shining.

                I thought it stood up pretty well. I don't know if it's a masterpiece, but for all the stylistic marvels, the work is quite hard edged, like blunt reality, and, like Kymba just said, unsentimental. Loved the soundtrack, too. It got the kiddo talking right away. Go Wendy Carlos!

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                • #9
                  I understand why 2001 is lauded, but for me there's just too much science, tech & not enough humanity. In fact, a rewatch of the movie made me see a lot of Kubrick's later movies as beautifully worked puzzle-boxes. Highly crafted, but ultimately empty of real content & a bit nihilistic. However, the only one I saw first time round in the cinema was, Full Metal Jacket. That was a good if disturbing movie about the systematic demolishing & dehumanising of young men, rebuilding them into killing machine cogs in the US military, which could be applied to boot camp, square bashing bullshit, in general. I may have seen 2001, on re-release, but I can't honestly remember.

                  Spock's speech about V'Ger lacking something, from the transcript, kind of sums up my problem with Kubrick's work.

                  KIRK: Spock. ...Spock? (as Spock turns Kirk and McCoy see that he is crying)
                  KIRK: Not for us?
                  SPOCK: No, Captain, not for us, ...for V'Ger. ...I weep for V'Ger, as I would for a brother. As I was when I came aboard, so is V'Ger now, empty, incomplete, ...searching. Logic and knowledge are not enough.
                  McCOY: Spock, are you saying that you've found, what you needed, but V'Ger hasn't?
                  DECKER: What would V'Ger need to fulfil itself?
                  SPOCK: Each of us, at some time in our life, turns to someone, a father, a brother, a god and asks 'Why am I here?' 'What was I meant to be?' V'Ger hopes to touch its Creator to find its answers.
                  KIRK: 'Is this all that I am? Is there nothing more?'

                  If I was a bit more fanciful, I could read it as a direct challenge to, 2001.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post

                    Kudos on the Tremors. My kid's about to turn 11. When she was in your kids' age range she was obsessed with The Wizard of Oz. I must have watched it at least 50 times, and that was probably half of her viewings. Whatever else it is, it is one snappily scripted production. Return to Oz, though more true to Baum in many ways, was not nearly so tightly scripted.

                    Old and new Disney stuff was also on the menu a lot. I remember the "racism forward" of Dumbo quite well, though I'm not sure if I watched it with her. Mostly, I just found a lot of the old Disney stuff heavy on the sentimentality. I suppose Snow White was the one I enjoyed re-watching (multiple times) the most.

                    Also, maybe I should rewatch Tinkerbell and the Lost Treasure because I'm going to recommend it to you. Especially if either of your kids is in a fairies phase, like mine was when she was their age. I like Independent Tinkerbell better than Peter Pan Associate Tinkerbell.
                    Heavy, heavy sentimentality for sure, and of
                    course part of me feels like I’m contributing pretty directly to Disney’s goal of controlling all entertainment. They also give me more than an hour of relatively quiet time, so I can forgive a tiny bit of corporate imperialism. Haha.

                    Snow White is still pretty dark. I’m waiting another couple of months for that one, but I’ll definitely look out for independent Tinkerbell. Peter Pan Is a pretty lousy companion for someone who mostly has it together.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
                      I understand why 2001 is lauded, but for me there's just too much science, tech & not enough humanity. In fact, a rewatch of the movie made me see a lot of Kubrick's later movies as beautifully worked puzzle-boxes. Highly crafted, but ultimately empty of real content & a bit nihilistic. However, the only one I saw first time round in the cinema was, Full Metal Jacket. That was a good if disturbing movie about the systematic demolishing & dehumanising of young men, rebuilding them into killing machine cogs in the US military, which could be applied to boot camp, square bashing bullshit, in general. I may have seen 2001, on re-release, but I can't honestly remember.

                      Spock's speech about V'Ger lacking something, from the transcript, kind of sums up my problem with Kubrick's work.


                      If I was a bit more fanciful, I could read it as a direct challenge to, 2001.
                      My two cents on Full Metal Jacket:

                      It says something that most people remember Vincent D’Onofrio’s Pyle more than they remember Matthew Modine’s Joker, and many people forget that boot camp was only half of the movie. Maybe Kubrick should have quit while he was ahead. This may also be my comment on Kubrick...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doc View Post

                        My two cents on Full Metal Jacket:

                        It says something that most people remember Vincent D’Onofrio’s Pyle more than they remember Matthew Modine’s Joker, and many people forget that boot camp was only half of the movie. Maybe Kubrick should have quit while he was ahead. This may also be my comment on Kubrick...
                        I think I saw it when I'd just moved to London. I was most impressed by how they'd turned the disused London Docks into Vietnam, using potted palm trees. However, the performance that stands out for me is, R. Lee Ermey, as Gunnery Sergeant Hartman. That's the authentic heart of that movie.

                        As a Sixties kid, I was brought up on all that war stuff. Everybody still had Post-War PTSD, on a virtually Global scale.

                        I think that was the last war movie I went to see. My first, was, Cross of Iron. I went, because it was directed by, Sam Peckinpah & starred, James Coburn (In Like Flint, etc.). Brilliant movie, my 17 year old self was not disappointed. Then, there was,The Deer Hunter, I enjoyed it, but looking back, it's the stellar cast that saves it. My next, was, Apocalypse Now, went to see it, with a guy named, 'Spider,' after an all night party, at a morning matinee, in the West Midlands. We went, because the alternative, Dawn of the Dead,' looked too heavy. What a trip.

                        The next was either, Kelly's Heroes, which I saw in a cinema, in Tiberius, on the banks of the Galilee, in Israel (the audience of young guys started booing at the movie, until they realised what was actually going down & that it was a decent comedy), or Sam Fuller's, The Big Red One. That was probably the most B.movie & authentic of them all. I would really like to see the Director's cut.

                        Last edited by Pietro_Mercurios; 10-08-2020, 08:01 AM. Reason: Added '[i]starred[/i].'

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                        • #13
                          I would agree that there's a certain cold distance in much of Kubrick's work. Sometimes he seems like a wildlife documentarian solely intent on recording what the animals are up to. Of course, the intense composition of his imagery goes against that, but I hope you get the idea.

                          Since we're talking war movies, a year or two back I rewatched Fires on the Plain. That would be one war movie that seems to defy Truffaut's dictum that every war film ends up pro-war. Another would be Come and See, which I just saw a new edition of in my local video store. Not sure I need to see that one again.

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                          • #14
                            Pietro’s war movies made me think of Platoon. I may have to watch it again. I last saw it right after Army basic training (a million years ago) and cried my eyes out watching Willem Dafoe’s Elias running after the chopper and getting gunned down. It was a little too real for me at the time, and maybe even too real now. It always surprises me when I remember that Oliver Stone made Charlie Sheen a real actor twice. Apocalypse Now still seems far too real, as well, but it makes me sad in a far different way.

                            I think Heresiologist’s observation about Kubrick works. Maybe that’s why I often think he lets things go too long. I always wanted to nature documentary to stop the camera before the prey was actually eaten alive...

                            And more importantly, there are still local video stores somewhere?

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