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Star Wars Universe discussion thread

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  • #16
    The Serenity Forum made me think of this one:


    One thing that made the Star Wars universe great was all the fantastic names!

    Skywalker, what a great name for a space opera, something that the audiences can sink their teeth into, easy to remember and quite catchy!

    I think I will make huge lists of names up and copyright them,haha, sell them to the movie comapnies.

    Skywalker is in no way as clever or more cool than Stormbringer!


    Nothing can top Stormbringer! (well, Mike could top it I suppose, but no-one else! haha)


    When I make my story, I am going to think of some catchy names!


    I think that is a small, but very helpful factor to get the reader hooked!


    Then, once hooked, the author can reel them in with the terrific plot!

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

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    • #17
      Critics of SW have mentioned that the names have at least a little 70's kitsch about them, but they work well enough for me. For fans of course that's no problem. I can't really think objectively about this though as SW has become so famous that it's kind of transcended its period.

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      • #18
        very true.

        "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
        - Michael Moorcock

        Comment


        • #19
          (emerges from lurking)

          I know some folks have very strong opinions on the prequels, but:
          Hated them.
          For several reasons. First, I don't think they were necessary. If you saw the originals, you have all of the story you need... you already know how Anakin became Darth.
          Also, I don't really think Star Wars is about story. The story is pretty basic good vs evil, much of it culled from old movie serials and Jack Kirby's "New Gods" comic book. The point, to me anyway, was fun- the visual effects, the seat-of-the-pants action, and the fun, knowing humor. The prequels have visual effects all over the place... but none of the fun.
          The logic of the prequels bothers me as well. Apparently, I'm supposed to watch all six films in chronological order. This doesn't make a lot of sense. There are characters in the prequels whose only reason for being is that they are fan favorites from the original series, and, when the series is viewed in the order Lucas indended, whose character arcs have little-to-no payoff (I'm thinking of, especially, Jango Fett/Boba Fett, and the Qui Gon subplot tacked on to the end of Ep III, with no follow up in IV - V).
          Gah. I'll stick with "Serenity".

          (resumes lurking)

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by lallarona
            (emerges from lurking)

            I know some folks have very strong opinions on the prequels, but:
            Hated them.
            For several reasons. First, I don't think they were necessary. If you saw the originals, you have all of the story you need... you already know how Anakin became Darth.
            Also, I don't really think Star Wars is about story. The story is pretty basic good vs evil, much of it culled from old movie serials and Jack Kirby's "New Gods" comic book. The point, to me anyway, was fun- the visual effects, the seat-of-the-pants action, and the fun, knowing humor. The prequels have visual effects all over the place... but none of the fun.
            The logic of the prequels bothers me as well. Apparently, I'm supposed to watch all six films in chronological order. This doesn't make a lot of sense. There are characters in the prequels whose only reason for being is that they are fan favorites from the original series, and, when the series is viewed in the order Lucas indended, whose character arcs have little-to-no payoff (I'm thinking of, especially, Jango Fett/Boba Fett, and the Qui Gon subplot tacked on to the end of Ep III, with no follow up in IV - V).
            Gah. I'll stick with "Serenity".

            (resumes lurking)

            Hello lallarona,


            It's my pleasure to meet you.


            Thanks for stopping by and coming away from your lurking.

            "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
            - Michael Moorcock

            Comment


            • #21
              In the interest of full disclosure, I have to admit that I saw all three prequels.
              In the theater.
              The third, knowing how much I disliked Ep's I & II.
              Well, I had to, you know. I saw the first Star Wars flick when I was seven; I am emotionally committed.

              And nice to meet you, too.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by lallarona
                ....
                Well, I had to, you know. I saw the first Star Wars flick when I was seven; I am emotionally committed.

                And nice to meet you, too.

                very cool! thanks.



                -Lemec

                "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                - Michael Moorcock

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by lallarona
                  Also, I don't really think Star Wars is about story. The story is pretty basic good vs evil, much of it culled from old movie serials and Jack Kirby's "New Gods" comic book. The point, to me anyway, was fun- the visual effects, the seat-of-the-pants action, and the fun, knowing humor. The prequels have visual effects all over the place... but none of the fun.
                  Couldn't agree with you more. The prequels are flashy, glitzy, sometimes well-acted but not too often ......and just not as much fun. The chemistry and warmth that 'made' the first three films so much fun between Han, Luke and Leia is almost completely lacking in the prequels....and some of the stuff Lucas sticks in there, like Jar-Jar, just seems like utter crap.

                  What a terrible waste of sci-fi's most successful franchise.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    One thing that bugged me about the Prequel was how Anakin's mother got left as a slave on Tatooine. You'd have thought the Jedi Council could have arranged something better for the mother of one of their apprentices.

                    I like the concept of the Force and Jedi, quasi-mystical though it may be, it adds something for me when a story hints at larger things/mysteries in life. And the idea of a semi-covert order pledged to help those in difficulty is cool. I've noticed though that for the most part the Jedi seem to help themselves or large power interests most of the time. Don't see them helping the poorer folk of the SW universe quite so much (see above).

                    Not so happy about the way George Lucas seems to have 'borrowed' story ideas without credit. Perhaps he may have genuinely forgotten some of his more 'casual' sources but I'm pretty certain that one case in point is The Pastel City by M J Harrison. Harrison had lightsabres, called Baans, in Pastel city 7 yrs before GL used them in SW. And there are other parallels too with TPC.

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                    • #25
                      In Episode One, Qui-Gon had no choice to leave the mother there.

                      Before and during Episode Two, it made no sense whatsoever to leave the mother on Tattooine.

                      The jedi coffers that low? They sure have enough credits to buy/build spaceships.

                      Anikan could not have had a side job or gamble to get some extra money?

                      You would think Anikan would have used his extraordinary powers to cheat at cards or something? -enter another pod race, perhaps?

                      Why didn't he even visit her to make sure she was ok?

                      I agree, The Jedi should have done something, but I guess that was the only way Lucas could tell the story of the mother's death. He could have come up with something else.

                      Anyway, I did not notice or forgot that Lucas is one of the 2006 Inductees for the Science Fiction Hall of Fame.

                      http://www.sfhomeworld.org/exhibits/.../scifi_hof.asp


                      Nice to see Frank Herbert on there!

                      "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                      - Michael Moorcock

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Am I the only one that actually liked the prequels? In their whole they werent as good as the previus three but they had their moments.

                        One quote from Episode II, after anakin kills the capturers of his mother and goes back to the princes:
                        "I killed them. I killed them all. They're dead, every single one of them. And not just the men, but the women and the children, too. They're like animals, and I slaughtered them like animals. I HATE THEM! "(on the background, the darth vader music plays for a few seconds) That gave me the shivers!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I watched the whole saga with my girlfriend who had never seen even a piece of them (not even trailers), she found that something was missing in the episodes I, II and III compared to the others: humor. Not much laugh, so a bit pretentious. Also, many sequences are non-sense according to Hitchcock's fridge theory: Anakin's mother death, Jar Jar Binks, the origin of C3-PO connected with Anakin, R2-D2 twenty years before as well as Chewbacca in episode III... It looks like George tried to build artificial bridges between stories and to satisfy fans more than himself. Disappointing on this way...
                          Free the West Memphis Three

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                          • #28
                            I was born just after Return of the Jedi was released, so as far as I'm concerned Star Wars has always been there. It's the standard by which I measure the entertainment value of movies. They're the epitome of cool, fun escapism.

                            But for some people Star Wars became a legend. The prequels weren't made with the reality in mind. They could've still been good movies in their own right if Lucas hadn't believed in his own legend. He didn't create Star Wars, and he couldn't possibly re-create it, even if he were a decent writer.

                            Much of the original trilogy revolves around the heroes sneaking around, blowing stuff up and running away. Half the plot of The Empire Strikes Back (often seen as the best one) revolves around the Millennium Falcon's broken hyperdrive and evading the Empire while trying to fix it.

                            The prequels got hung up on setting up the story of the fall of the Galactic Republic, which isn't anywhere near as exhilarating. They showed us the Clone Wars, which are mentioned in a single throwaway sentence in the original trilogy. Exciting to the die-hard fans perhaps, but I doubt to anyone else.

                            In fact, the entire premise of the prequel trilogy was "See Anakin Skywalker becoming Darth Vader". Which I don't feel I saw that at all. Darth Vader can be summed up with one word: power. When he spoke about the Force, it was to point out the awesome power of the Dark Side. I saw how Ani (for heaven's sake), hindered by plot devices and misconceptions, got suckered into signing the Sith contract. That doesn't make him Vader, it makes him a loser.

                            The only bits I enjoyed were the ones with Qui-Gon and/or Darth Maul. Liam Neeson brought some good, fun adventure flair into the movie, the sort of thing Harrison Ford provided in the originals. Maul wasn't much of a character, but he looked cool. The duel between them (and Obi-Wan) nailed the new-style saber fighting. Everything after that seemed bland by comparison and completely superfluous.

                            One thing that bugs me but I haven't read much criticism about is the female characters, or lack thereof. The original movies may have kept them to a minimum just the same, but at least Leia did provide a strong female presence by herself. Padmé on the other hand literally sits around brushing her hair in the last one. I'm surprised Lucas got away with that in 2005.

                            I could go on like this for hours, because I still love the original movies. As cool, fun escapism, as I said. Disturbingly, Star Wars has gone well beyond movies in the minds of many people... discussing the prequels with them is like discussing politics and religion. It's incredibly annoying that I have to expressly avoid and distance myself from the prequels in order to enjoy a set of movies. Especially if I want to see them in their original form.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Shadowheart
                              [George Lucas] didn't create Star Wars
                              Would you possibly care to expand upon this statement?
                              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                              • #30
                                Maybe he refers to the mythologies George Lucas used as well as The Hidden Fortress from Akira Kurosawa which was used as a base for Star Wars A New Hope synopsis.
                                Free the West Memphis Three

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