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"The Brothers Grimm"

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  • "The Brothers Grimm"

    This has been out for 2 weeks in the states. How does it match up to the fantastic work Terry Gilliam has done in the past?

    http://miramax.com/thebrothersgrimm/
    ‘In real life people do not spend every minute shooting each other, hanging themselves or making declarations of love. They don’t spend every minute saying clever things. Rather they eat, drink, flirt, talk nonsense."

  • #2
    Looks good! I'd be interested to know how well it's doing.

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    • #3
      Looks interesting. This is the first time I've heard of this. Terry Gilliam movies are normally pretty good so I think I'll check this one out when it gets a UK release.

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      • #4
        Well worth a try! :)
        \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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        • #5
          I saw it. I enjoyed it quite a bit. It felt very short though, like more could have happened in it.

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          • #6
            I would like to know too! My aunt's the film editor on 'Grimmy' as she so affectionately nicknames it...

            Actually it's funny how you mention that the film's too short. If my aunt and Terry had had their way, it would have been about three hours! :D Without disclosing too much information (mind you it's on the net if you want to find it) the production was hit with problem after problem.

            But hell, it wouldn't be a Terry Gilliam film without any hitches!

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            • #7
              Didnt BRAZIL have TONS of problems?

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              • #8
                Don't know about Brazil, but "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" and "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" had problems by the bucketload.

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                • #9
                  Well, I know there were problems with the ending of the film... there's a DVD with both (The Criterion version?). Obviously The Studio (aka The Man) wanted a happy, feel-good ending, and Gilliam wanted the magnificent downer that we all know and love. To quote IMDb:

                  Gilliam had trouble with studio producers over the black ending he wanted on the film. The producers wanted a "happy Hollywood" film which eliminated (among other things) the final transition and a critical line of dialogue which reveals the fate of Jill. These changes were made, and this "butchered" version was shown on US television at least once. Gilliam threatened to disown the film, and consequently the cinematic release and all videotape versions show the film essentially as he intended it to be seen (although the US cinematic release still omitted the line about Jill).
                  "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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                  • #10
                    Just saw it yesterday. Great dissappointment, Gilliam's turning senile I'm afraid. Tim Burton knows better how to do these things. Childish, utterly unconvincing, too overladen with loose ends of fairy tales, bad research of the period and geography, Disney-landish locations, no suspense in the plot, just in a few sequences, and very pc: French-bashing - like a couple more that Hollywood churns out in recent time (The new Zorro's also trying to exploit anti-French moods).
                    Yes, the editing, that's pretty good, and I know what I'm talking about, but it couldn't save the movie.
                    Google ergo sum

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                    • #11
                      The critics seem to agree with you L'E, since it got a slating in both the newspapers I saw today. One review suggested that he'd simply made a live action Shrek! 8O I haven't seen the film, so I can't really comment. It has rather put me off though.
                      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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                      • #12
                        LEtranger, Gilliam's goofing on the French certainly goes back beyond the most current trend, remember The Holy Grail.

                        I was hoping for Grimm to be a much better movie.
                        "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Talisant
                          LEtranger, Gilliam's goofing on the French certainly goes back beyond the most current trend, remember The Holy Grail.

                          I was hoping for Grimm to be a much better movie.
                          Goofing would have been fine, but this was psyops, propaganda. Never mind, I liked most of his older stuff.
                          Google ergo sum

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                          • #14
                            Not to belabor the question, but I saw the movie more than a month ago, and thinking back, I do seem to remember that it did go a bit for the throat in it's characterisation of the French, what do you think, was it Gilliam or the producers agenda (American?), now I'm curious. Thanks.
                            "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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                            • #15
                              Well, I can't say for sure, but I found it remarkable after seeing the newest "Zorro" (Zeta-Jones/Banderas) a couple of days earlier (my younger daughter saw in three times in the meantime for the horse stunts in it) and here the villain was again French. A guy whose sinister pursuit of profit and dark schemings threatened FREEDOM and DEMOCRACY ... a coincidence? :scratch:
                              And, of course, in either movie they didn't eat French Fries!
                              Google ergo sum

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