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Kingdom of Heaven

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  • #1
    I'm curious to see it but I read it was full of cliches. How good/bad was Bloom?
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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    • #2
      I think it was that meek hero thing again - the boy who follows in his fathers footsteps. I'm expecting (at a crucial scene) the guy to utter some witticism that his father told him as a boy. Some crap about freedom or some such, that only NOW does he understand.

      I haven't watched it yet - but I'm looking forward to it. That said, epic movies are ten a penny these days (especially after the success of LOTR), which essentially says to me that a lot of guff gets injected into movies that would have been inifinitely better if only they'd pared down the script.

      I guess I'm looking for a movie to surprise me - that maybe the guy doesn't learn from his father, hates his guts / murders him (or maybe wasn't the noble, righteous guy he thought he was) and you get some sort of real character development.
      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

      Comment


      • #3
        It is in the same category as Troy, King Arthur, and Alexander. Like in Troy the other actors out act Bloom. Anyways, Bloom father comes looking for him and asks him to come to Jerusalem. The law comes looking for Bloom since he killed a priest. His father and his men fight it out with the cops ( and in the process Bloom's father is killed). It is not at all historic. It is an action film which has swords instead of guns and horses replace cars.

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        • #4
          Saw this today. I liked the fact that the film-maker's treatment of both sides in the conflict was morally neutral.

          Still I did find it to be quite clicheed and underwhelming. Not so much in that the acting was bad - but that as I suspected Bloom's character relied heavily on stale 'rite of passage' cliches - IMO a lazy way of forming character development. I guess it just bugs me that not once, but several times the guy rattles off a bunch of half baked philosophisms that his father tells him earlier in the picture and now he's all experienced and stuff he can blow them off on other people.

          The continuity bugged me too - I never really bought Bloom's character much as a military commander - he seems to go from one minute from 'humble, inexperienced blacksmith' to '5 star general'. A bit like in Spartacus - how an illiterate slave in one scene suddenly becomes a military genuis.

          Still the christian king (with leprosy) was interesting - seemed almost Elric -like.
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • #5
            Originally posted by TheAdlerian
            You know I have a beef with acting. Sometimes I like boring actors because they remind me of real people. I used to work in a Max security prison that had all kinds of crazy shit happening all of the time. Most of us went about our tasks grunting and saying a few few words with blank expressions on our faces.

            The worse that it got the less expression that most people had. Sometimes I think that boring ones are more in line with my experience, but anyway, I know what people mean.

            In that case I think that you should watch Werner Hertzog's "Heart of Glass", where all the "actors" are ordinary folk that play the film under hypnosis. Very little expression all round. Perhaps Orlando Bloom should give it a go?
            ‘In real life people do not spend every minute shooting each other, hanging themselves or making declarations of love. They don’t spend every minute saying clever things. Rather they eat, drink, flirt, talk nonsense."

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            • #6
              Originally posted by TheAdlerian
              That was a very funny post.

              I mean really though, what is the range of expression that you see in your daily life?
              Quite a bit actually, but perhaps I'm unusual.
              ‘In real life people do not spend every minute shooting each other, hanging themselves or making declarations of love. They don’t spend every minute saying clever things. Rather they eat, drink, flirt, talk nonsense."

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              • #7
                Yes, to tell you the truth it was hard for me to swallow Blooms transformation from blacksmith to knight. I also couldn't believe all the modern or agnostic things Bloom or others said. Also when one knight said Jesus doesn't command his followers to kill believers I was almost expecting him to start talking like a Protestant and say something like "indulgences are not Biblical" I could not even belive the portrayal of muslims being nice nor could I believe the portrayal of Saladin. Historicaly Saladin was not going to negotiate with Balian of Ibelin. However, Saladin let the people pay ransoms after Balain told him he would destroy all the muslim sights including the dome of rock. I kind of pulled myself back when Saladin picked upthe cross and put it on the table. That scene not only was fake. It felt fake.

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                • #8
                  Interesting article - though perhaps not too surprising.

                  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4544173.stm
                  Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                  Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                  Comment


                  • #9
                    Okay I am going to rant some more. To be honest, the only character in the entire film which appears to have been accurately depicted in the screenplay was Reynald of Chatillon, portrayed brutally by Brendan Gleeson. But, as is often the case, appearances can be quite deceiving. Though Reynald was as remorseless and bloodthirsty as Gleeson illustrates him in the film, he was not specifically targeting Muslims as is the claim. He had been confined to the city of Antioch to begin with because he had led a three-week raid on a Christian island in which he and his men murdered and raped the inhabitants located there. Reynald was with King Guy de Lusignan in the battle against Saladin and did indeed have his head lobbed off at the request of Saladin himself but he was hardly what one would consider a close associate of the king as the film suggests. Unless you happen to be fully aware ahead of viewing Kingdom of Heaven, you probably would not realize that King Baldwin IV, more commonly referred to as the leper king, was played by the genuinely gifted performer, Edward Norton as his face is entirely covered by a silver mask and his voice is altered slightly from the way in which audiences are normally accustomed to hearing it. As philosophic and venerable as the film portrays him as, this was not the King Baldwin IV history remembers him as, though he was certainly no ruthless tyrant either. He did not exemplify the close-knit relationship with his sister, Sibylla, as well. Actually he was immensely hard on Guy de Lusignan for a particular incident, which was not engaging Saladin when he had the chance, and demanded that his sister request a divorce from him, which she refused.

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                    • #10
                      Very interesting thread, this. But before I fork out my 14 odd bucks to see this thing, can anyone tell me if the action/battle scenes are any good?

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                      • #11
                        Yeah, it's worth watching. The fight scenes are well made. I enjoyed it ... minus a few strange and somewhat cheesy feeling heroic speeches it was a good movie.

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