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The Aviator.

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  • The Aviator.

    I don't know why they used Leonardo Dicaprio to play H. Hughes at first.
    But i think i think he did a good job at it.
    I've had OCD since i was 9 years old. And i really felt what he went through at some points (albeit it was overkill in the end). This disease is horrible if it takes control of your life. It's always a battle to keep it in check. Don't worry! I've been to the shrink with the problem and she said that i had to be an expert at the disease to control it (Kaizened healthcare anyone?). I found it odd though that it's more common than people think, as i have the disease, you see people who have it (in varying degrees) aswell.
    Serotonin is the weirdest chemical in the brain i think.

    And i think the movie shows how greed can hound after a man of innovations and ideas. Although he was excentric and a bit over-flamboyant. These are also qualities of a pioneer aswell.
    Not many risk-taking characters like that today i think.
    But maybe thats because they are more common or conventional these days. Or maybe i entirely missed someone.

    One thing that bugs me about Scorsese movies is, that after 9/11, he keeps referring to NY in his movies. It seems too contrived.
    Or maybe i'm just being silly.

  • #2
    DiCaprio quite surprised me in this - turned in a much better performance here than he did in Gangs of New York. Bit of a surprise that after all the Titanics he's done that he is a good actor after all.

    What I don't think came over so well was an understanding of HH's neurosis in the film. The script seemed to park HH's problems, when they became inconvenient to the story - I don't buy it that he can go from the depths of apparent insanity (sitting alone and naked in the dark, muttering to himself in a corner) to miraculously (within the space of a few days) regaining his faculties so he can defend himself in the courtroom scene.

    Also the one scene with the young HH and his mother just didn't seem to me to be a strong enough trauma to cause the sorts of problems that the guy had. Either they got in wrong - or the script just didn't capture it.

    That said, Cate Blanchett did a pretty amazing job of portraying Katherine Hepburn!
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

    Comment


    • #3
      I found the movie a terrible disappointment.
      Leonardo di Cappuccino only acts at acting. Most of what happens is transported by dialogue which is NOT "cinematic", but "theatrical" as a means. Conflicts (in other words the very matter of a drama) weren't fathomed enough to create tension and suspense. Ava Gardner (once a Goddess for millions!) was a mere dark-haired Barbie Doll and people, especially the younger are left alone at the end - I would have expected a short text telling the spectators what became of HH and when he died.
      I think they relied too much on two names - Leonardo and Scorcese.

      Conceded that the last 20 mins gathered some speed and momentum.
      Google ergo sum

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah I wondered about that - they never really did wrap up the film to show people what happened to HH.

        I did find the obvious CGI Spruce Goose more than a little objectionable - the effects were a little cartoonish IMO.
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TheAdlerian
          I find OCD to be a strange problem that sometimes plagues people that do not have or do not seek information. For instance, washing your hands does not get them clean. There is no such thing as clean! Also, a person with this problem can have sloppy sex but will not touch a door knob! Frankly, as the movie suggested, I think that it has to do with some strange form of narcissism. This is not in all cases though.
          I know that, but it's that ugly 'feeling' of not being clean that kills a persons rational thinking. It's the same chemicals which trigger the irrational feeling of being 'head over heals in love'. But i guess you knew that already! :)

          Some good points about the narcissism issue. But i think the disease can lead to a form of narcissism. And i think it works the other way around as well.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LEtranger
            I found the movie a terrible disappointment.
            Leonardo di Cappuccino only acts at acting. Most of what happens is transported by dialogue which is NOT "cinematic", but "theatrical" as a means. Conflicts (in other words the very matter of a drama) weren't fathomed enough to create tension and suspense. Ava Gardner (once a Goddess for millions!) was a mere dark-haired Barbie Doll and people, especially the younger are left alone at the end - I would have expected a short text telling the spectators what became of HH and when he died.
            I think they relied too much on two names - Leonardo and Scorcese.

            Conceded that the last 20 mins gathered some speed and momentum.
            I thought that the theatrical thing was intentional. Weren't older movies bent on a theatrical style? In any case the pacing was a problem in the movie i think. I got annoyed that there was no "short text", but his demise was one failure after the other after 'Spruce Goose'.
            His demise was a really sad and pathetic venture into oblivion.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TheAdlerian
              devilchicken,

              I once knew a woman that told me that she really did not want her daughter, but pretended that she did. Anyway, this mom was always on top of the kid about everything. This included dirt, germs, plants, birds, and whatever else could get you “dirty� and the kid developed all kinds of weirdness around these issues.
              The problems i got, was centered in an English international school i went to in singapore.

              During the second semester i was not allowed to go pee when i really had to. But was told that if i got my hands dirty (which i did intentionally) i could go to the bathroom and wash them, during which i peed as well.
              I got caught one day and the teacher went ape-shit, and called my mother. I can't seem to forgive her for taking me to that school in the first place. My brother calls it the Nazi school.
              But the problems came when i was getting older.
              I HATED that school..

              They brought up all kinds of weird danger scenarios like drugs and glue-sniffing when i was like 7 years old. A real psycho school.

              I was awestruck when we came home and other kids told me that it was illegal to hit children in Sweden. I love my homeland.

              Comment


              • #8
                A former friend of mine was going through some therapy a few years ago. Apparently her therapist told her that almost all teenagers go through an obsessive compulsive phase during puberty. Interesting because I remember having the handwashing fetish during my early teens. It went away after a year or two but I've always wondered what it was all about.
                Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I grew up in a family where my mother was (and is) living with an undiagnosed and untreated mental illness. She has periods where she will talk to herself (mostly broken, strangled phrases) as well as periods of sudden rage.

                  I never understood it - we never really talked much in my family so as an adult I still to this day do not really know what was going on. My dad told me that he was never able to get her to see a doctor because my mum would often hide the behaviour whenever he had anyone come over to assess her mental health.
                  Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                  Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My mum was a bit barmy and sadly in the end she died as a result, though she was almost ninety. It was impossible to get her to any kind of doctor. I loved her a lot, but it was very frustrating trying to help her, since she was also a congenital liar. That said, I suspect I became a writer -- i.e. a paid liar -- as a result. I've also been in relationships with someone who would go into dark moods and refuse to speak for days at a stretch. Everything I tried to do to get her to talk about her problems came to nothing. In the end it destroyed the relationship.
                    I'm more than sympathetic to anyone who finds themselves in this sort of situation with someone they care about. It was easier for me to get relative strangers into the Priory, for instance, than it was to get my closest relatives help.
                    I had a friend who took a job teaching in Singapore and said his experience was terrible -- all kinds of Kafka-like stuff. He didn't last there for very long.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow, I'm sorry to hear about your mom. That must be a rough life for all at times. Does your mom like to read? maybe I could make some suggestions.

                      I hope that she sees more good days than bad!
                      Yes she does like to read - mostly classics (Thomas Hardy, Charles Dickens etc) but unfortunately I don't really keep in touch with her any longer (since I got married and moved to the States at the end of last year). I find I have nothing to talk to her about - so any conversation I try to have with her (at the behest of my dad who still lives with her) is strained and often quite unproductive.

                      The worry in the back of my mind is that if anything happens to my dad there will be noone to look after my mother. In recent years its become clear that she could not manage by herself (for one thing she no longer leaves the house of her own volition and now relies on my dad to buy food and clothes etc.). My own situation means I cannot easily leave the US (for any extended period of time), as an immigrant I would lose my immigration benefits and put a big strain on my new family over here. Even if I could get her over here I'm not sure it would be fair to subject my wife and her family to my mother's 'situation'. From a purely selfish perspective its taken me over 20 years to get away from that situation and I'm not sure I would want to revisit it, or subject others to it.

                      Having had some mild depression myself I know that mental illness still has a real social stigma attached to it. Even if you are sympathetic to the person and their situation - there is only so much you can put up with before the well of goodwill starts to run dry. Its sad really but once you realise that the person isn't going to get better - at least until they acknowledge the existence of a problem, or are 'forced' to confront it then nothing is going to change.
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        First thing -- it would not make sense to bring your mother over here, since her chances of getting health insurance would be slight. The NHS has much better services for dealing with people in your mothers potential situation and I'd advise you to start dealing with that problem as soon as possible. Social services are considerably more sophisticated and varied than they are, in the main, over here. Social services stepped in on my mother's behalf. Unfortunately, she took to not letting people in, even though they had done a considerable amount for her. This is the problem, of course, with people who for one reason or another prefer to live solitary lives. I don't know where your mother lives, but mine lived in Worthing, Sussex, where they have tremendous
                        'after care' services when people come out of hospital. Not every district is as good as others, but generally speaking those outside of big cities are not as overstretched as those inside them. You can get all kinds of information and help on this problem. If I had brought my mother over to the US she would have been worse, I'm sure, and would not have had the benefits of the NHS. Presumably you've discussed this potential problem with your father ?

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheAdlerian
                          I’m sure that your mom was unaware of their strange behavior as it was probably unpredictable to people out side of that culture. It’s my understanding that Singapore is a super strict society. Am I right?
                          It's guided by "Authoritaniastic" (grammar check?) principles (i.e leaning towards fascism), or so i've read. The people of Singapore are starting to get fed up by their governments methods. It's probably harkening from old english governance of the former colony. I read once that there was some writer(s), criticizing their countries government, and a need for reform.

                          Originally posted by TheAdlerian
                          Anyway, you might want to write a scathing and honest letter to the head of that school telling them just what you think of their behavior and how it affected you. This is something suggested for people that have been abused. Really, you don’t even have to mail the thing, but I would.
                          I've thought about sending an e-mail. I even found the site for the school! (Which was hard to find). But i don't know if it would do any good?
                          It's been twenty years since i came home from Singapore.
                          The society is 'not' governed by insight into social problems.
                          It just turns a blind eye to it with more disciplining.
                          They haven't been tought any better i guess.
                          I also tell about the experience to people in my own country when they desire more stricter behavioural learning in school (beating). Like teachers et al. And i tell why school uniforms are a bad thing as it strips kids of individualistic endeavours. And that they need to experiment on social rolls in class.

                          There were also pederasts lurking about which is the most negative symptom of such a society.

                          Originally posted by TheAdlerian
                          Sometimes people keep a lot of “revenge energy� that builds up and has no where to go, so a letter is good way to vent it. Try a couple practice ones. Liberally shake your first at the sky while you are doing it. Try to forgive mom.
                          I get along with my mom anyway. She understands my feelings most of the time. But i get the slight hint sometimes that she gets shocked by
                          my feelings, intellect and insights into society. Maybe thats just me?
                          She feels guilty about what happened, but she said that there was no alternative for her at the time. Dad was too busy at work and was hardly around (being the boss). He expresses disgust at what happened, and anger. I said i didn't know anything at the time because i thought it was the norm.

                          Swedish schools which have started there, probably because (you know why), is promising.

                          Thanks for your advices. :D . It's good that you are willing to help people for free. That is a more precious gift than anything i could imagine.
                          People like you are in short supply these days..
                          Thanks Alderian!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            First thing -- it would not make sense to bring your mother over here, since her chances of getting health insurance would be slight.
                            Interestingly people with certain types of mental illness are inelligible to receive US visas (it all has to be disclosed at the medical and embassy interview).

                            Presumably you've discussed this potential problem with your father ?
                            No its not been discussed - with everything that's been going on since September (moving to the US, getting married, finding an apartment, getting work authorised, and now finding a job) I've been a little out of touch with what's going on back at home.

                            My parents live in Southend on Sea. Not a great NHS area it must be said - though my dad is looking to sell the house sometime this year and move up to Norfolk. Apparently my mother is staying in Essex (meaning she doesn't want to move), so he's looking for some sort of sheltered accommodation for her down there.

                            I'm aware however that there is going to be a time when my dad might not be around to look after her (and as she has no other extended family nearby) so some sort of provision will need to be made...
                            Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                            Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Devil,

                              Do you know what the laws are in the UK regarding when a person is unable to take care of themselves? If your mom is like this 24/7 I bet that something could be done.
                              Well all I know is that my dad tried to get her mentally assessed many years ago without success (no doctor was willing to do anything because she wasn't willing to voluntarily submit to treatment, and the doctor who saw her at the time was sufficiently convinced that she didn't have a problem).

                              I think that experience (many years ago) has made him unwilling to have any expectations of mental healthcare professionals (even though I accept that things are probably different these days). The conservative government closed down many of the NHS psychiatric hospitals in favour of their 'care in the community' policy back in the mid 90's. That policy put the responsibility of care (for the elderly, as well as the mentally ill) in the hands of relatives, many of whom struggled to look after them.

                              My parents are quite slow to accept and deal with change. For my dad to 'call in the professionals' now I think would be a realisation for him that his marriage is over. They never had the healthiest relationship - my mothers unresolved problems being at the core of it. I suspect my mother is now a far cry from the person he married.

                              Back at the start of last year, my mum was taken to hospital for a blood disorder - my dad had a chance then to ask about the potential options for help. Apparently nurses had asked after her mental state - after they noticed my mum couldn't remember what of the week it was, and had little recollection of doctors coming to see her. To tell the truth I've actually felt quite detached from the whole situation - my dad has always kept things to himself where this is concerned, and our family dynamic is such that I never really felt it appropriate to ask him about it.
                              Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                              Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                              Comment

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