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Covenant movie

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  • Covenant movie

    What are the odds of this being any good?

    http://www.cinescape.com/0/editorial...8&obj_id=43187

  • #2
    I've read all the books, so curiosity would probably draw me to it, though on rental rather than at the cinema. I wouldn't hold out much hope of it being very true to the original, though - there's probably too much internalisation by the main character. That said though, I'd like to see the magic effects, not to mention all the non-human races and apparitions.
    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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    • #3
      Re: Covenant movie

      Originally posted by Patrick
      What are the odds of this being any good?

      http://www.cinescape.com/0/editorial...8&obj_id=43187
      It would be nice if they could do it justice. One of my favorite series of books. I am usually cynical about the chances of these things turning out well and being that I just watched that wrecking of LeGuin's Earthsea, my outlook might be bleaker than it should be.



      Ah how did it go...

      Joy is in the ears that hear -Saltheart Foamfollower...
      I loved the giants in those books.
      When they had advanced together to meet on common
      ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
      and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
      each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
      mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
      killing, and the ground ran with blood.

      Homer, The Illiad

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      • #4
        Are these books any good? I've got some of them and can easily get the rest, though I've never read them, and after reading his Gap series I kinda swore never to read any of his stuff whilever I remain alive! If it's being filmed, however, I'll have to have me a little looksee, maybe...

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        • #5
          Pretty inevitable given the success of LotR. It will need a re-write in these PC days. Not cool to have a rapist as your hero. I read these books in my teens. I wasn't too impressed then, it just seemed like an obvious Tolkien rip-off with a "dark lord", a Gollum-type character and the innovation of having a complete and utter wanker for the main character. Still, it could be your "guilty pleasure"!
          \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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          • #6
            It will need a re-write in these PC days. Not cool to have a rapist as your hero.
            Certainly a different style for the 'hero' :?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rookie
              It will need a re-write in these PC days. Not cool to have a rapist as your hero.
              Certainly a different style for the 'hero' :?
              *Cue french accent* "I'm so sorry, I did not know we had a rap-ist working here".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mikey_C
                Still, it could be your "guilty pleasure"!
                That is just how I would categorize it Mikey. I know it's not cool, but you know... :oops:
                You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TheAdlerian
                  please expand on the character.
                  Thomas Covenant is a leper (can't remember how come!) living in the present day USA. This gives him a lot of excuses to feel sorry for himself. He has a car accident (or something like that) and finds himself in an alternative world, where the inhabitants all believe him to be some kind of hero returned to save them (shades of Erekose, come to think of it). However - he doesn't believe the world is real, hence he is called the Unbeliever (sic). Because of this he rapes a young woman (as one would, presumably :? ) which gives him another reason to feel sorry for himself. I can't remember whether he ever does start "believing" - but there's been a few more weighty tomes written since I gave up, I'll warrant.

                  To change tack slightly - wasn't there once going to be a film made of "The Mists of Avalon"? I've got an album by Breton harpist Alan Stivell, which I thought was supposed to be the soundtrack. That could have been quite good.
                  \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                  • #10
                    There was an TNT original movie called Mists of Avalon based on the book a couple of years back.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hmm, I'll try to expand on the character a bit,

                      Thomas Covenant is a writer and recluse who's wife had recently left him due to his contracting leprosy, taking thier only child with her. His illness causes him to not only lose his family, but almost all contact with humanity. The town he lives near wants nothing to do with him; they pay his utilities so he won't come into town and they start having groceries delivered to him, even the local sheriff wants him gone, but due to a loyal agent or lawyer (can't remember which) he remains at his home outside of town.

                      One thing about Covenant is that his illness has trained him to be absolutley aware of any injury that he gets as it can lead to serious infection and a spreading of his disease to other parts of his body. He lost a few fingers this way in that he did not notice when his hand was hurt due to the deading of nerves which is apparently a symptom of leprosy (the author seemed to do his homework on the subject). Anyway, he is always checking himself and performing a special set of routines that he was taught at a leprosy treatment center to make certain he has not even the slightest injury - not even a cut. He does, however, perform one "ritual" of shaving with a straight edge razor to confront his illness head on (I assume).

                      Anyway, I am getting off the subject. One day he reaches a point where he is so frustrated by his isolation that he decides to go into town and pay his phone bill in person. Amid looks of horror and disgust, he walks the town streets and winds up being hit by a car. As he slips away from consciousness he finds himself being talked to by some being. The person seems to possess immense power and he mocks Covenant and tells him to deliver a message. Covenant wakes from this conversation only to find himself in a completely different world. A girl is there and without telling the entire story (which as you can see I almost could do :lol: ) she gives him something that heals his leprosy right on the spot and explains to him that this place, "The Land", is filled with great power and health. The Land is a place that takes on a personality of its own and in more than any other books, is something that those who live there worship and protect. That is, of course just the "good guys". The bad ones wish to destroy it.

                      Well, Covenant knows nothing of this; all he knows is that he had an accident and now finds himself in a fantasy world, with a beautiful young girl, and all of his sensations back and as healthy as he was before his leprosy. He also notices that he can be sexualy excited, something which he has not been in years since his affliction and being that he believes this is just a dream, he rapes the young girl. The girl doesn't protest because she believes him to be the incarnation of a hero, Berek Half-Hand who was prophesied to return to The Land and destroy it's oppressor (A Sauron-like character but very different). Many think he is this hero.

                      Covenant not only is missing fingers but also has a ring of white gold - a substance that doesn't exist in The Land and is rumored to hold the key to magic that defies all other kinds in the world and this is even more evidence for the people that he is the prophesy come to life. You see, all natural things in the Land posses a power which only the highly trained can bring forth, so there are those who work with stone and those that know wood etc, each one able to call on the power of The Land through these things. All things in The Land are connected to the Land - wood, stone and people too. But not White Gold. It sits outside the Land's power and is therefore not limited in the energy it can conjure up.

                      So Covenant goes through the books being told he is some great hero reborn and that he possesses great magic power. He thinks it's all a dream and has no idea how to use his ring, thus he calls himself The Unbeliever. He is a gruff, angry anti-hero type who has trouble doing anything to help the people of The Land. But of course, he does manage to "save" them and beat the bad guys. Throughout the story, there is this relation to Covenant healing himself and The Land's healing; and Covenant being so familiar with illness and despair, becomes the perfect choice for a hero to heal the world. I say choice because in the stories there is some outside force at work bringing him to The Land to aid it against those who would destroy it, although the author never says what that is, he just just hints.

                      There is actually so much more to the stories, even though I have written about a thousand words too many right here. If I keep on going, why read the books! :lol:

                      I would suggest these books to anyone without hesitation. I loved them. The first Chronicles of Thomas Covenant are the best (Three books, Lord Foul's Bane, The Illearth War and The Power That Preserves). The next three seemed a little too forced, as if the writer was trying too hard to make some new adventures for Covenant (IMHO).


                      ...I can't believe I remember that much and actually could probably retell the stories completely. What a dork I am...
                      :oops:
                      When they had advanced together to meet on common
                      ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
                      and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
                      each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
                      mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
                      killing, and the ground ran with blood.

                      Homer, The Illiad

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by VonWeiner
                        ...I can't believe I remember that much and actually could probably retell the stories completely. What a dork I am...
                        :oops:
                        That's why we missed you, VW :D

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                        • #13
                          Donaldson has recently published the first book (of four) of The Last Chronicles Of Thomas Covenant. Titled 'The Runes Of The Earth' you can read an excerpt on http://www.stephenrdonaldson.com/ - where it tells you the name of the other titles in the series along with the projected publishing dates.
                          I'll probably end up reading those, too, if I live long enough to see them all published. He could do with a few lessons from Mr. M on how to write a bit quicker. (Saying that, though, I've been waiting a while to find out what happens to Colonel Pyat!)
                          You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                          -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                          Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                          :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                          "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ah, you guys are making me blush. :oops: :lol:

                            Oh and Thanks Gov'na for the info on the new series of books. I had no idea he was making more stories. :D
                            When they had advanced together to meet on common
                            ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
                            and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
                            each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
                            mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
                            killing, and the ground ran with blood.

                            Homer, The Illiad

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I concur; the first trilogy was, to me, a bit better than the second.

                              For either series, I recommend having a crying towel handy. I remember thinking, reading them years ago as a kid, that these were some really heavy books, both physically* and emotionally. 8O


                              -=-=-=-
                              * seriously, those paperbacks seemed like they were made of lead. Dense-packed pages, thin paper with no 'fluff' to it.... :o

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